schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Paleogene Xenarthra and the evolution of South American mammals

Recent studies show Xenarthra to be even more isolated systematically from other placental mammals than traditionally thought. The group not only represents 1 of 4 primary placental clades, but proposed links to other fossorial mammal taxa (e.g., Pholidota, Palaeanodonta) have been contradicted. No... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of mammalogy 2021-08-23, Vol.96 (4), p.622-634
Main Author: Gaudin, Timothy J
Other Authors: Croft, Darin A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: US: American Society of Mammalogists
ID: ISSN: 0022-2372
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_journals_1750211747
title: Paleogene Xenarthra and the evolution of South American mammals
format: Article
creator:
  • Gaudin, Timothy J
  • Croft, Darin A
subjects:
  • Eocene
  • Eutherians
  • evolution
  • Fossils
  • Hypotheses
  • Marsupials
  • Morphology
  • Natural history
  • paleobiology
  • Paleocene
  • Paleontology
  • Phylogenetics
  • phylogeny
  • South America
  • Sparassodonta
  • SPECIAL FEATURES
  • Taxonomy
  • Xenarthra
ispartof: Journal of mammalogy, 2021-08-23, Vol.96 (4), p.622-634
description: Recent studies show Xenarthra to be even more isolated systematically from other placental mammals than traditionally thought. The group not only represents 1 of 4 primary placental clades, but proposed links to other fossorial mammal taxa (e.g., Pholidota, Palaeanodonta) have been contradicted. No unambiguous Paleocene fossil xenarthran remains are known, and Eocene remains consist almost exclusively of isolated cingulate osteoderms and isolated postcrania of uncertain systematic provenance. Cingulate skulls are unknown until the late middle Eocene, and the oldest sloth and anteater skulls are early Oligocene and early Miocene age, respectively; there are no nearly complete xenarthran skeletons until the early Miocene. Ecological reconstructions of early xenarthrans based on extant species and the paleobiology of extinct Neogene taxa suggest the group’s progenitors were myrmecophagous with digging and perhaps some climbing adaptations. The earliest cingulates were terrestrial diggers and likely myrmecophagous but soon diverged into numerous omnivorous lineages. Early sloths were herbivores with a preference for forested habitats, exhibiting both digging and climbing adaptations. We attribute the rarity of early xenarthran remains to low population densities associated with myrmecophagy, lack of durable, enamel-covered teeth, and general scarcity of fossil localities from tropical latitudes of South America. The derivation of numerous omnivorous and herbivorous lineages from a myrmecophagous ancestor is a curious and unique feature of xenarthran history and may be due to the peculiar ecology of the native South American mammal fauna. Further progress in understanding early xenarthran evolution may depend on locating new Paleogene fossil sites in northern South America. Los estudios sistemáticos recientes muestran que, a nivel sistemático, los xenartros están aún más aislados de otros mamíferos placentarios de lo que se pensaba tradicionalmente. El grupo no sólo representa una de las cuatro ramas principales de los Placentalia, sino que también se han refutado las hipótesis previas de posibles conexiones con otros taxones de mamíferos fosoriales (por ejemplo Pholidota, Palaenodonta). No se conocen restos fósiles inequívocos de xenartros del Paleoceno y los restos provenientes del Eoceno consisten casi exclusivamente de osteodermos aislados de cingulados y restos postcraneanos aislados de origen sistemático incierto. No se conocen cráneos razonablemente comp
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0022-2372
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-2372
  • 1545-1542
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.7740839
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_proqu
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_journals_1750211747
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA427555198
jstor_id26372932
oup_id10.1093/jmammal/gyv073
sourcerecordidA427555198
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1475t-7f1837bbdb5fa8e6bef95e52e355ecd5c8a64a4bb6749dde89871999d061363d3
addsrcrecordideNqFkdtLwzAUxoMoOC-vvgkBnwTrcmma5knG8AYDBRV8C2l7umWszUxTwf_eSIeCKCOQAznf73ycLwidUHJJieLjZWOaxqzG8493IvkOGlGRiiRebBeNCGEsYVyyfXTQdUtCiJCMjNDVo1mBm0ML-BVa48PCG2zaCocFYHh3qz5Y12JX4yfXhwWeNOBtaVo8mHVHaK-OBY439RC93Fw_T--S2cPt_XQyS2gqRUhkTXMui6IqRG1yyAqolQDBgAsBZSXK3GSpSYsik6mqKshVLqlSqiIZ5Rmv-CE6G-auvXvroQt66XrfRktNpSCMUpnKH9U8bqVtW7vgTdnYrtSTlEkhBFV5VF3-oYqngsaWroXaxve_gNK7rvNQ67W3jfEfmhL9lb3eZK-H7COQ_gJKG8xXktHJrv7HzgfM9evtFqeDdtkF57_VLIt_rDiL_YuhX1gXV9o27hMKZ7Hg
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1750211747
display
typearticle
titlePaleogene Xenarthra and the evolution of South American mammals
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorGaudin, Timothy J ; Croft, Darin A
creatorcontribGaudin, Timothy J ; Croft, Darin A
descriptionRecent studies show Xenarthra to be even more isolated systematically from other placental mammals than traditionally thought. The group not only represents 1 of 4 primary placental clades, but proposed links to other fossorial mammal taxa (e.g., Pholidota, Palaeanodonta) have been contradicted. No unambiguous Paleocene fossil xenarthran remains are known, and Eocene remains consist almost exclusively of isolated cingulate osteoderms and isolated postcrania of uncertain systematic provenance. Cingulate skulls are unknown until the late middle Eocene, and the oldest sloth and anteater skulls are early Oligocene and early Miocene age, respectively; there are no nearly complete xenarthran skeletons until the early Miocene. Ecological reconstructions of early xenarthrans based on extant species and the paleobiology of extinct Neogene taxa suggest the group’s progenitors were myrmecophagous with digging and perhaps some climbing adaptations. The earliest cingulates were terrestrial diggers and likely myrmecophagous but soon diverged into numerous omnivorous lineages. Early sloths were herbivores with a preference for forested habitats, exhibiting both digging and climbing adaptations. We attribute the rarity of early xenarthran remains to low population densities associated with myrmecophagy, lack of durable, enamel-covered teeth, and general scarcity of fossil localities from tropical latitudes of South America. The derivation of numerous omnivorous and herbivorous lineages from a myrmecophagous ancestor is a curious and unique feature of xenarthran history and may be due to the peculiar ecology of the native South American mammal fauna. Further progress in understanding early xenarthran evolution may depend on locating new Paleogene fossil sites in northern South America. Los estudios sistemáticos recientes muestran que, a nivel sistemático, los xenartros están aún más aislados de otros mamíferos placentarios de lo que se pensaba tradicionalmente. El grupo no sólo representa una de las cuatro ramas principales de los Placentalia, sino que también se han refutado las hipótesis previas de posibles conexiones con otros taxones de mamíferos fosoriales (por ejemplo Pholidota, Palaenodonta). No se conocen restos fósiles inequívocos de xenartros del Paleoceno y los restos provenientes del Eoceno consisten casi exclusivamente de osteodermos aislados de cingulados y restos postcraneanos aislados de origen sistemático incierto. No se conocen cráneos razonablemente completos de cingulados hasta finales del Eoceno medio; los cráneos más antiguos de perezosos y osos hormigueros provienen del Oligoceno temprano y del Mioceno temprano, respectivamente; y no existen esqueletos completos o casi completos de ninguno de los 3 linajes hasta el Mioceno temprano. Reconstruimos la ecología de los primeros xenartros basándonos en las especies actuales y lo que se sabe de la paleobiología del Mioceno y de los taxones extintos más recientes. Nuestros resultados sugieren que los primeros xenartros eran mirmecófagos y poseían adaptaciones para cavar y tal vez para trepar. Los primeros cingulados eran cavadores terrestres y probablemente mirmecófagos, pero pronto divergieron en numerosos linajes omnívoros. Nuestras reconstrucciones indican que los primeros perezosos eran herbívoros con preferencia de hábitats boscosos, tal vez exhibiendo adaptaciones tanto para cavar como para trepar. Atribuimos la rareza de restos de los primeros xenartros a varios factores: bajas densidades poblacionales asociadas a hábitos mirmecófagos; falta de dientes duraderos y cubiertos de esmalte; y una escasez general de localidades de mamíferos tempranos de las latitudes tropicales de América del Sur. La derivación de numerosos linajes omnívoros y herbívoros de un ancestro mirmecófago es un rasgo curioso y único de la historia de los xenartros y puede deberse a la peculiar ecología de la fauna de mamíferos sudamericanos. Los nuevos avances en la comprensión de la evolución temprana de los xenartros podrían depender de la localización de nuevos sitios fósiles paleógenos en áreas de tierras bajas poco accesibles del norte de América del Sur.
identifier
0ISSN: 0022-2372
1EISSN: 1545-1542
2DOI: 10.1093/jmammal/gyv073
3CODEN: JOMAAL
languageeng
publisherUS: American Society of Mammalogists
subjectEocene ; Eutherians ; evolution ; Fossils ; Hypotheses ; Marsupials ; Morphology ; Natural history ; paleobiology ; Paleocene ; Paleontology ; Phylogenetics ; phylogeny ; South America ; Sparassodonta ; SPECIAL FEATURES ; Taxonomy ; Xenarthra
ispartofJournal of mammalogy, 2021-08-23, Vol.96 (4), p.622-634
rights
02015 American Society of Mammalogists, www.mammalogy.org
12015 American Society of Mammalogists
22015 American Society of Mammalogists, www.mammalogy.org 2015
3COPYRIGHT 2015 Oxford University Press
4Copyright Oxford University Press, UK Aug 2015
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1475t-7f1837bbdb5fa8e6bef95e52e355ecd5c8a64a4bb6749dde89871999d061363d3
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1475t-7f1837bbdb5fa8e6bef95e52e355ecd5c8a64a4bb6749dde89871999d061363d3
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
search
creatorcontrib
0Gaudin, Timothy J
1Croft, Darin A
title
0Paleogene Xenarthra and the evolution of South American mammals
1Journal of mammalogy
descriptionRecent studies show Xenarthra to be even more isolated systematically from other placental mammals than traditionally thought. The group not only represents 1 of 4 primary placental clades, but proposed links to other fossorial mammal taxa (e.g., Pholidota, Palaeanodonta) have been contradicted. No unambiguous Paleocene fossil xenarthran remains are known, and Eocene remains consist almost exclusively of isolated cingulate osteoderms and isolated postcrania of uncertain systematic provenance. Cingulate skulls are unknown until the late middle Eocene, and the oldest sloth and anteater skulls are early Oligocene and early Miocene age, respectively; there are no nearly complete xenarthran skeletons until the early Miocene. Ecological reconstructions of early xenarthrans based on extant species and the paleobiology of extinct Neogene taxa suggest the group’s progenitors were myrmecophagous with digging and perhaps some climbing adaptations. The earliest cingulates were terrestrial diggers and likely myrmecophagous but soon diverged into numerous omnivorous lineages. Early sloths were herbivores with a preference for forested habitats, exhibiting both digging and climbing adaptations. We attribute the rarity of early xenarthran remains to low population densities associated with myrmecophagy, lack of durable, enamel-covered teeth, and general scarcity of fossil localities from tropical latitudes of South America. The derivation of numerous omnivorous and herbivorous lineages from a myrmecophagous ancestor is a curious and unique feature of xenarthran history and may be due to the peculiar ecology of the native South American mammal fauna. Further progress in understanding early xenarthran evolution may depend on locating new Paleogene fossil sites in northern South America. Los estudios sistemáticos recientes muestran que, a nivel sistemático, los xenartros están aún más aislados de otros mamíferos placentarios de lo que se pensaba tradicionalmente. El grupo no sólo representa una de las cuatro ramas principales de los Placentalia, sino que también se han refutado las hipótesis previas de posibles conexiones con otros taxones de mamíferos fosoriales (por ejemplo Pholidota, Palaenodonta). No se conocen restos fósiles inequívocos de xenartros del Paleoceno y los restos provenientes del Eoceno consisten casi exclusivamente de osteodermos aislados de cingulados y restos postcraneanos aislados de origen sistemático incierto. No se conocen cráneos razonablemente completos de cingulados hasta finales del Eoceno medio; los cráneos más antiguos de perezosos y osos hormigueros provienen del Oligoceno temprano y del Mioceno temprano, respectivamente; y no existen esqueletos completos o casi completos de ninguno de los 3 linajes hasta el Mioceno temprano. Reconstruimos la ecología de los primeros xenartros basándonos en las especies actuales y lo que se sabe de la paleobiología del Mioceno y de los taxones extintos más recientes. Nuestros resultados sugieren que los primeros xenartros eran mirmecófagos y poseían adaptaciones para cavar y tal vez para trepar. Los primeros cingulados eran cavadores terrestres y probablemente mirmecófagos, pero pronto divergieron en numerosos linajes omnívoros. Nuestras reconstrucciones indican que los primeros perezosos eran herbívoros con preferencia de hábitats boscosos, tal vez exhibiendo adaptaciones tanto para cavar como para trepar. Atribuimos la rareza de restos de los primeros xenartros a varios factores: bajas densidades poblacionales asociadas a hábitos mirmecófagos; falta de dientes duraderos y cubiertos de esmalte; y una escasez general de localidades de mamíferos tempranos de las latitudes tropicales de América del Sur. La derivación de numerosos linajes omnívoros y herbívoros de un ancestro mirmecófago es un rasgo curioso y único de la historia de los xenartros y puede deberse a la peculiar ecología de la fauna de mamíferos sudamericanos. Los nuevos avances en la comprensión de la evolución temprana de los xenartros podrían depender de la localización de nuevos sitios fósiles paleógenos en áreas de tierras bajas poco accesibles del norte de América del Sur.
subject
0Eocene
1Eutherians
2evolution
3Fossils
4Hypotheses
5Marsupials
6Morphology
7Natural history
8paleobiology
9Paleocene
10Paleontology
11Phylogenetics
12phylogeny
13South America
14Sparassodonta
15SPECIAL FEATURES
16Taxonomy
17Xenarthra
issn
00022-2372
11545-1542
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2021
recordtypearticle
recordideNqFkdtLwzAUxoMoOC-vvgkBnwTrcmma5knG8AYDBRV8C2l7umWszUxTwf_eSIeCKCOQAznf73ycLwidUHJJieLjZWOaxqzG8493IvkOGlGRiiRebBeNCGEsYVyyfXTQdUtCiJCMjNDVo1mBm0ML-BVa48PCG2zaCocFYHh3qz5Y12JX4yfXhwWeNOBtaVo8mHVHaK-OBY439RC93Fw_T--S2cPt_XQyS2gqRUhkTXMui6IqRG1yyAqolQDBgAsBZSXK3GSpSYsik6mqKshVLqlSqiIZ5Rmv-CE6G-auvXvroQt66XrfRktNpSCMUpnKH9U8bqVtW7vgTdnYrtSTlEkhBFV5VF3-oYqngsaWroXaxve_gNK7rvNQ67W3jfEfmhL9lb3eZK-H7COQ_gJKG8xXktHJrv7HzgfM9evtFqeDdtkF57_VLIt_rDiL_YuhX1gXV9o27hMKZ7Hg
startdate20210823
enddate20210823
creator
0Gaudin, Timothy J
1Croft, Darin A
general
0American Society of Mammalogists
1Oxford University Press
scope
0AAYXX
1CITATION
2BSHEE
33V.
47QG
57SN
67X7
77XB
888A
988E
1088I
118AF
128FD
138FE
148FH
158FI
168FJ
178FK
188G5
19ABUWG
20AZQEC
21BBNVY
22BENPR
23BHPHI
24C1K
25DWQXO
26FR3
27FYUFA
28GHDGH
29GNUQQ
30GUQSH
31HCIFZ
32K9.
33LK8
34M0L
35M0S
36M1P
37M2O
38M2P
39M7P
40MBDVC
41P64
42PADUT
43PQEST
44PQQKQ
45PQUKI
46PRINS
47Q9U
48R05
49RC3
50S0X
sort
creationdate20210823
titlePaleogene Xenarthra and the evolution of South American mammals
authorGaudin, Timothy J ; Croft, Darin A
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1475t-7f1837bbdb5fa8e6bef95e52e355ecd5c8a64a4bb6749dde89871999d061363d3
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2021
topic
0Eocene
1Eutherians
2evolution
3Fossils
4Hypotheses
5Marsupials
6Morphology
7Natural history
8paleobiology
9Paleocene
10Paleontology
11Phylogenetics
12phylogeny
13South America
14Sparassodonta
15SPECIAL FEATURES
16Taxonomy
17Xenarthra
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Gaudin, Timothy J
1Croft, Darin A
collection
0CrossRef
1Academic OneFile (A&I only)
2ProQuest Central (Corporate)
3Animal Behavior Abstracts
4Ecology Abstracts
5Health & Medical Collection
6ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
7Biology Database (Alumni Edition)
8Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
9Science Database (Alumni Edition)
10STEM Database
11Technology Research Database
12ProQuest SciTech Collection
13ProQuest Natural Science Collection
14Hospital Premium Collection
15Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
16ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
17Research Library (Alumni Edition)
18ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
19ProQuest Central Essentials
20Biological Science Collection
21ProQuest Central
22Natural Science Collection
23Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management
24ProQuest Central Korea
25Engineering Research Database
26Health Research Premium Collection
27Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
28ProQuest Central Student
29Research Library Prep
30SciTech Premium Collection
31ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
32ProQuest Biological Science Collection
33Biology Database
34Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
35Medical Database
36Research Library
37Science Database
38Biological Science Database
39Research Library (Corporate)
40Biotechnology and BioEngineering Abstracts
41Research Library China
42ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
43ProQuest One Academic
44ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
45ProQuest Central China
46ProQuest Central Basic
47University of Michigan
48Genetics Abstracts
49SIRS Editorial
jtitleJournal of mammalogy
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Gaudin, Timothy J
1Croft, Darin A
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitlePaleogene Xenarthra and the evolution of South American mammals
jtitleJournal of mammalogy
date2021-08-23
risdate2021
volume96
issue4
spage622
epage634
pages622-634
issn0022-2372
eissn1545-1542
codenJOMAAL
abstractRecent studies show Xenarthra to be even more isolated systematically from other placental mammals than traditionally thought. The group not only represents 1 of 4 primary placental clades, but proposed links to other fossorial mammal taxa (e.g., Pholidota, Palaeanodonta) have been contradicted. No unambiguous Paleocene fossil xenarthran remains are known, and Eocene remains consist almost exclusively of isolated cingulate osteoderms and isolated postcrania of uncertain systematic provenance. Cingulate skulls are unknown until the late middle Eocene, and the oldest sloth and anteater skulls are early Oligocene and early Miocene age, respectively; there are no nearly complete xenarthran skeletons until the early Miocene. Ecological reconstructions of early xenarthrans based on extant species and the paleobiology of extinct Neogene taxa suggest the group’s progenitors were myrmecophagous with digging and perhaps some climbing adaptations. The earliest cingulates were terrestrial diggers and likely myrmecophagous but soon diverged into numerous omnivorous lineages. Early sloths were herbivores with a preference for forested habitats, exhibiting both digging and climbing adaptations. We attribute the rarity of early xenarthran remains to low population densities associated with myrmecophagy, lack of durable, enamel-covered teeth, and general scarcity of fossil localities from tropical latitudes of South America. The derivation of numerous omnivorous and herbivorous lineages from a myrmecophagous ancestor is a curious and unique feature of xenarthran history and may be due to the peculiar ecology of the native South American mammal fauna. Further progress in understanding early xenarthran evolution may depend on locating new Paleogene fossil sites in northern South America. Los estudios sistemáticos recientes muestran que, a nivel sistemático, los xenartros están aún más aislados de otros mamíferos placentarios de lo que se pensaba tradicionalmente. El grupo no sólo representa una de las cuatro ramas principales de los Placentalia, sino que también se han refutado las hipótesis previas de posibles conexiones con otros taxones de mamíferos fosoriales (por ejemplo Pholidota, Palaenodonta). No se conocen restos fósiles inequívocos de xenartros del Paleoceno y los restos provenientes del Eoceno consisten casi exclusivamente de osteodermos aislados de cingulados y restos postcraneanos aislados de origen sistemático incierto. No se conocen cráneos razonablemente completos de cingulados hasta finales del Eoceno medio; los cráneos más antiguos de perezosos y osos hormigueros provienen del Oligoceno temprano y del Mioceno temprano, respectivamente; y no existen esqueletos completos o casi completos de ninguno de los 3 linajes hasta el Mioceno temprano. Reconstruimos la ecología de los primeros xenartros basándonos en las especies actuales y lo que se sabe de la paleobiología del Mioceno y de los taxones extintos más recientes. Nuestros resultados sugieren que los primeros xenartros eran mirmecófagos y poseían adaptaciones para cavar y tal vez para trepar. Los primeros cingulados eran cavadores terrestres y probablemente mirmecófagos, pero pronto divergieron en numerosos linajes omnívoros. Nuestras reconstrucciones indican que los primeros perezosos eran herbívoros con preferencia de hábitats boscosos, tal vez exhibiendo adaptaciones tanto para cavar como para trepar. Atribuimos la rareza de restos de los primeros xenartros a varios factores: bajas densidades poblacionales asociadas a hábitos mirmecófagos; falta de dientes duraderos y cubiertos de esmalte; y una escasez general de localidades de mamíferos tempranos de las latitudes tropicales de América del Sur. La derivación de numerosos linajes omnívoros y herbívoros de un ancestro mirmecófago es un rasgo curioso y único de la historia de los xenartros y puede deberse a la peculiar ecología de la fauna de mamíferos sudamericanos. Los nuevos avances en la comprensión de la evolución temprana de los xenartros podrían depender de la localización de nuevos sitios fósiles paleógenos en áreas de tierras bajas poco accesibles del norte de América del Sur.
copUS
pubAmerican Society of Mammalogists
doi10.1093/jmammal/gyv073
tpages13
oafree_for_read