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An update on the growing evidence base for peer support

Purpose As peer support services have become increasingly used in mental health settings as a recovery-oriented practice, so has the body of published research on this approach to care. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the current evidence base for peer support for adults with me... Full description

Journal Title: A life in the day 2017-05-01, Vol.21 (3), p.161
Main Author: Chyrell Bellamy
Other Authors: Timothy Schmutte , Larry Davidson
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Brighton: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ID: ISSN: 2042-8308
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recordid: cdi_proquest_journals_1906838282
title: An update on the growing evidence base for peer support
format: Article
creator:
  • Chyrell Bellamy
  • Timothy Schmutte
  • Larry Davidson
subjects:
  • Adults
  • Clinical outcomes
  • Community mental health services
  • Emergency services
  • Empowerment
  • Feasibility studies
  • Health services
  • Health status
  • Hospitalization
  • Medical research
  • Mental disorders
  • Mental health care
  • Paraprofessionals
  • Peer tutoring
  • Psychiatry
  • Quality
  • Quality of life
  • Recovery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Severity
  • Social support
  • Support groups
  • Support services
  • Systematic review
ispartof: A life in the day, 2017-05-01, Vol.21 (3), p.161
description: Purpose As peer support services have become increasingly used in mental health settings as a recovery-oriented practice, so has the body of published research on this approach to care. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the current evidence base for peer support for adults with mental illness in two domains: mental health and recovery, and physical health and wellness. Design/methodology/approach To provide a robust, non-redundant, and up-to-date review, first the authors searched for meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Second, the authors found individual studies not included in any of the reviews. Findings Peer services are generally equally effective to services provided by non-peer paraprofessionals on traditional clinical outcomes. Although some studies found peer services to be effective at reducing hospitalization rates and symptom severity, as a whole, the current evidence base is confounded by heterogeneity in programmatic characteristics and methodological shortcomings. On the other hand, the evidence is stronger for peer support services having more of a positive impact on levels of hope, empowerment, and quality of life. Research limitations/implications In addition to the need for further high-quality research on peer support in mental and physical health domains, the authors also question whether measures of hope, empowerment, and integration into the community are more relevant to recovery than traditional clinical outcomes. Originality/value This paper provides an original, robust, and up-to-date review of the evidence for peer services.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 2042-8308
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 2042-8308
  • 2042-8316
url: Link


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descriptionPurpose As peer support services have become increasingly used in mental health settings as a recovery-oriented practice, so has the body of published research on this approach to care. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the current evidence base for peer support for adults with mental illness in two domains: mental health and recovery, and physical health and wellness. Design/methodology/approach To provide a robust, non-redundant, and up-to-date review, first the authors searched for meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Second, the authors found individual studies not included in any of the reviews. Findings Peer services are generally equally effective to services provided by non-peer paraprofessionals on traditional clinical outcomes. Although some studies found peer services to be effective at reducing hospitalization rates and symptom severity, as a whole, the current evidence base is confounded by heterogeneity in programmatic characteristics and methodological shortcomings. On the other hand, the evidence is stronger for peer support services having more of a positive impact on levels of hope, empowerment, and quality of life. Research limitations/implications In addition to the need for further high-quality research on peer support in mental and physical health domains, the authors also question whether measures of hope, empowerment, and integration into the community are more relevant to recovery than traditional clinical outcomes. Originality/value This paper provides an original, robust, and up-to-date review of the evidence for peer services.
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subjectAdults ; Clinical outcomes ; Community mental health services ; Emergency services ; Empowerment ; Feasibility studies ; Health services ; Health status ; Hospitalization ; Medical research ; Mental disorders ; Mental health care ; Paraprofessionals ; Peer tutoring ; Psychiatry ; Quality ; Quality of life ; Recovery ; Rehabilitation ; Severity ; Social support ; Support groups ; Support services ; Systematic review
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abstractPurpose As peer support services have become increasingly used in mental health settings as a recovery-oriented practice, so has the body of published research on this approach to care. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the current evidence base for peer support for adults with mental illness in two domains: mental health and recovery, and physical health and wellness. Design/methodology/approach To provide a robust, non-redundant, and up-to-date review, first the authors searched for meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Second, the authors found individual studies not included in any of the reviews. Findings Peer services are generally equally effective to services provided by non-peer paraprofessionals on traditional clinical outcomes. Although some studies found peer services to be effective at reducing hospitalization rates and symptom severity, as a whole, the current evidence base is confounded by heterogeneity in programmatic characteristics and methodological shortcomings. On the other hand, the evidence is stronger for peer support services having more of a positive impact on levels of hope, empowerment, and quality of life. Research limitations/implications In addition to the need for further high-quality research on peer support in mental and physical health domains, the authors also question whether measures of hope, empowerment, and integration into the community are more relevant to recovery than traditional clinical outcomes. Originality/value This paper provides an original, robust, and up-to-date review of the evidence for peer services.
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