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Effectiveness of blood pressure lowering: evidence-based comparisons between men and women

The global burden of blood pressure-related disease is escalating faster among women than among men and, in recent years, age-adjusted mortality rates among women have actually increased. This has led to the speculation that there might be major sex-specific differences in the effectiveness of preve... Full description

Journal Title: Expert review of cardiovascular therapy 2010, Vol.8 (2), p.199-209
Main Author: Turnbull, Fiona
Other Authors: Woodward, Mark , Anna, Vibeke
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Informa Healthcare
ID: ISSN: 1477-9072
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20136606
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recordid: cdi_proquest_journals_502026483
title: Effectiveness of blood pressure lowering: evidence-based comparisons between men and women
format: Article
creator:
  • Turnbull, Fiona
  • Woodward, Mark
  • Anna, Vibeke
subjects:
  • Aging
  • Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
  • Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
  • Blood pressure
  • blood pressure-lowering regimens
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cardiovascular Diseases - complications
  • Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
  • coronary heart disease
  • Demographic aspects
  • Female
  • gender-specific
  • Health aspects
  • Humans
  • Hypertension - complications
  • Hypertension - drug therapy
  • Hypertension - prevention & control
  • major cardiovascular events
  • Male
  • meta-analyses
  • observational studies
  • Prevention
  • randomized, controlled trials
  • Regulation
  • Risk Assessment
  • Risk Factors
  • Sex Characteristics
  • sex-specific
  • stroke
  • treatment adherence
  • Treatment Outcome
ispartof: Expert review of cardiovascular therapy, 2010, Vol.8 (2), p.199-209
description: The global burden of blood pressure-related disease is escalating faster among women than among men and, in recent years, age-adjusted mortality rates among women have actually increased. This has led to the speculation that there might be major sex-specific differences in the effectiveness of preventive therapies such as blood pressure-lowering drugs. However, large overviews of both observational and clinical trial data provide strong evidence that the protection against serious vascular events afforded by blood pressure reduction using a range of commonly used drugs is comparable for men and women. Underestimation of cardiovascular risk and supoptimal therapy are more likely to account for poorer outcomes among women. These differences highlight the importance of global initiatives such as 'Go Red for Women .
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1477-9072
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1477-9072
  • 1744-8344
url: Link


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descriptionThe global burden of blood pressure-related disease is escalating faster among women than among men and, in recent years, age-adjusted mortality rates among women have actually increased. This has led to the speculation that there might be major sex-specific differences in the effectiveness of preventive therapies such as blood pressure-lowering drugs. However, large overviews of both observational and clinical trial data provide strong evidence that the protection against serious vascular events afforded by blood pressure reduction using a range of commonly used drugs is comparable for men and women. Underestimation of cardiovascular risk and supoptimal therapy are more likely to account for poorer outcomes among women. These differences highlight the importance of global initiatives such as 'Go Red for Women .
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subjectAging ; Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage ; Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use ; Blood pressure ; blood pressure-lowering regimens ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Cardiovascular Diseases - complications ; Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality ; coronary heart disease ; Demographic aspects ; Female ; gender-specific ; Health aspects ; Humans ; Hypertension - complications ; Hypertension - drug therapy ; Hypertension - prevention & control ; major cardiovascular events ; Male ; meta-analyses ; observational studies ; Prevention ; randomized, controlled trials ; Regulation ; Risk Assessment ; Risk Factors ; Sex Characteristics ; sex-specific ; stroke ; treatment adherence ; Treatment Outcome
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abstractThe global burden of blood pressure-related disease is escalating faster among women than among men and, in recent years, age-adjusted mortality rates among women have actually increased. This has led to the speculation that there might be major sex-specific differences in the effectiveness of preventive therapies such as blood pressure-lowering drugs. However, large overviews of both observational and clinical trial data provide strong evidence that the protection against serious vascular events afforded by blood pressure reduction using a range of commonly used drugs is comparable for men and women. Underestimation of cardiovascular risk and supoptimal therapy are more likely to account for poorer outcomes among women. These differences highlight the importance of global initiatives such as 'Go Red for Women .
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