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Physiological mechanisms underlying OsNAC5-dependent tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress

To understand the functions of transcription factor OsNAC5 in response to abiotic stress, we generated transgenic rice plants with knockdown OsNAC5 by RNA-interfered (RNAi) and overexpressing OsNAC5, and investigated the effects of cold, drought and salt stress on wild-type (WT), RNAi and overexpres... Full description

Journal Title: Planta 2011-08-01, Vol.234 (2), p.331-345
Main Author: Song, Shi-Yong
Other Authors: Chen, Ying , Chen, Jie , Dai, Xiao-Yan , Zhang, Wen-Hao
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
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Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-0935
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recordid: cdi_proquest_journals_879414595
title: Physiological mechanisms underlying OsNAC5-dependent tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress
format: Article
creator:
  • Song, Shi-Yong
  • Chen, Ying
  • Chen, Jie
  • Dai, Xiao-Yan
  • Zhang, Wen-Hao
subjects:
  • Abscisic acid
  • Abscisic Acid - pharmacology
  • Adaptation, Physiological - genetics
  • Agriculture
  • Arabidopsis - genetics
  • Arabidopsis - growth & development
  • Arabidopsis - physiology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Biotechnology
  • Carbohydrates - analysis
  • Cold Temperature
  • Drought
  • Droughts
  • Ecology
  • Food
  • Forestry
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Plant - physiology
  • Genes
  • Genetically engineered foods
  • Germination
  • Germination - physiology
  • Hydrogen Peroxide - analysis
  • Hydrogen Peroxide - metabolism
  • Life Sciences
  • Malondialdehyde - analysis
  • Malondialdehyde - metabolism
  • Mannitol - pharmacology
  • Original Article
  • Oryza - genetics
  • Oryza - growth & development
  • Oryza - physiology
  • Oxidative stress
  • Physiological aspects
  • Plant Proteins - genetics
  • Plant Proteins - metabolism
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plants
  • Plants, Genetically Modified - genetics
  • Plants, Genetically Modified - growth & development
  • Plants, Genetically Modified - physiology
  • Potassium - analysis
  • Potassium - metabolism
  • Proline - analysis
  • Proline - metabolism
  • Recombinant Fusion Proteins
  • Rice
  • RNA Interference
  • RNA, Plant - genetics
  • Salt tolerance
  • Seedlings
  • Seedlings - genetics
  • Seedlings - growth & development
  • Seedlings - physiology
  • Seeds - genetics
  • Seeds - physiology
  • Sodium - analysis
  • Sodium - metabolism
  • Sodium Chloride - pharmacology
  • Stress (Psychology)
  • Stress, Physiological
  • Sugars
  • Table salt
  • Transcription Factors - genetics
  • Transcription Factors - metabolism
  • Transgenic plants
ispartof: Planta, 2011-08-01, Vol.234 (2), p.331-345
description: To understand the functions of transcription factor OsNAC5 in response to abiotic stress, we generated transgenic rice plants with knockdown OsNAC5 by RNA-interfered (RNAi) and overexpressing OsNAC5, and investigated the effects of cold, drought and salt stress on wild-type (WT), RNAi and overexpression rice lines. Our results demonstrated that RNAi lines became less tolerant to these stresses than WT plants, while overexpression of OsNAC5 in Arabidopsis and rice enhanced tolerance to these stresses. The mechanisms underlying the changes in tolerance of the transgenic rice plants to abiotic stresses were explored by measuring free proline (Pro) and soluble sugar contents in WT and transgenic plants. Accumulation of Pro and soluble sugars was positively correlated with OsNAC5 expression levels. The less accumulation of Pro in RNAi lines may be accounted for by inhibition of Pro synthesis and transport at transcriptional levels. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of OsNAC5 enhanced and reduced accumulation of malondialdehyde and H2O2, suggesting that knockdown of OsNAC5 renders RNAi plants more susceptible to oxidative damage. The RNAi lines displayed higher Na+/K+ ratio due to greater accumulation of Na+ ions than WT under salt stress conditions, and expression of genes encoding tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter was lower in RNAi lines than in WT under both control and salt-stressed conditions. Seed germination of RNAi and overexpression plants was more and less inhibited by salt and mannitol than that of WT, respectively. Seed germination of overexpression and RNAi plants was more and less sensitive than that of WT to ABA. These findings highlight the important role of OsNAC5 played in the tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress by regulating downstream targets associated with accumulation of compatible solutes, Na+ ions, H2O2 and malondialdehyde.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-0935
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-0935
  • 1432-2048
url: Link


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titlePhysiological mechanisms underlying OsNAC5-dependent tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress
creatorSong, Shi-Yong ; Chen, Ying ; Chen, Jie ; Dai, Xiao-Yan ; Zhang, Wen-Hao
creatorcontribSong, Shi-Yong ; Chen, Ying ; Chen, Jie ; Dai, Xiao-Yan ; Zhang, Wen-Hao
descriptionTo understand the functions of transcription factor OsNAC5 in response to abiotic stress, we generated transgenic rice plants with knockdown OsNAC5 by RNA-interfered (RNAi) and overexpressing OsNAC5, and investigated the effects of cold, drought and salt stress on wild-type (WT), RNAi and overexpression rice lines. Our results demonstrated that RNAi lines became less tolerant to these stresses than WT plants, while overexpression of OsNAC5 in Arabidopsis and rice enhanced tolerance to these stresses. The mechanisms underlying the changes in tolerance of the transgenic rice plants to abiotic stresses were explored by measuring free proline (Pro) and soluble sugar contents in WT and transgenic plants. Accumulation of Pro and soluble sugars was positively correlated with OsNAC5 expression levels. The less accumulation of Pro in RNAi lines may be accounted for by inhibition of Pro synthesis and transport at transcriptional levels. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of OsNAC5 enhanced and reduced accumulation of malondialdehyde and H2O2, suggesting that knockdown of OsNAC5 renders RNAi plants more susceptible to oxidative damage. The RNAi lines displayed higher Na+/K+ ratio due to greater accumulation of Na+ ions than WT under salt stress conditions, and expression of genes encoding tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter was lower in RNAi lines than in WT under both control and salt-stressed conditions. Seed germination of RNAi and overexpression plants was more and less inhibited by salt and mannitol than that of WT, respectively. Seed germination of overexpression and RNAi plants was more and less sensitive than that of WT to ABA. These findings highlight the important role of OsNAC5 played in the tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress by regulating downstream targets associated with accumulation of compatible solutes, Na+ ions, H2O2 and malondialdehyde.
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1EISSN: 1432-2048
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languageeng
publisherBerlin/Heidelberg: Springer
subjectAbscisic acid ; Abscisic Acid - pharmacology ; Adaptation, Physiological - genetics ; Agriculture ; Arabidopsis - genetics ; Arabidopsis - growth & development ; Arabidopsis - physiology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Biotechnology ; Carbohydrates - analysis ; Cold Temperature ; Drought ; Droughts ; Ecology ; Food ; Forestry ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant - physiology ; Genes ; Genetically engineered foods ; Germination ; Germination - physiology ; Hydrogen Peroxide - analysis ; Hydrogen Peroxide - metabolism ; Life Sciences ; Malondialdehyde - analysis ; Malondialdehyde - metabolism ; Mannitol - pharmacology ; Original Article ; Oryza - genetics ; Oryza - growth & development ; Oryza - physiology ; Oxidative stress ; Physiological aspects ; Plant Proteins - genetics ; Plant Proteins - metabolism ; Plant Sciences ; Plants ; Plants, Genetically Modified - genetics ; Plants, Genetically Modified - growth & development ; Plants, Genetically Modified - physiology ; Potassium - analysis ; Potassium - metabolism ; Proline - analysis ; Proline - metabolism ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins ; Rice ; RNA Interference ; RNA, Plant - genetics ; Salt tolerance ; Seedlings ; Seedlings - genetics ; Seedlings - growth & development ; Seedlings - physiology ; Seeds - genetics ; Seeds - physiology ; Sodium - analysis ; Sodium - metabolism ; Sodium Chloride - pharmacology ; Stress (Psychology) ; Stress, Physiological ; Sugars ; Table salt ; Transcription Factors - genetics ; Transcription Factors - metabolism ; Transgenic plants
ispartofPlanta, 2011-08-01, Vol.234 (2), p.331-345
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descriptionTo understand the functions of transcription factor OsNAC5 in response to abiotic stress, we generated transgenic rice plants with knockdown OsNAC5 by RNA-interfered (RNAi) and overexpressing OsNAC5, and investigated the effects of cold, drought and salt stress on wild-type (WT), RNAi and overexpression rice lines. Our results demonstrated that RNAi lines became less tolerant to these stresses than WT plants, while overexpression of OsNAC5 in Arabidopsis and rice enhanced tolerance to these stresses. The mechanisms underlying the changes in tolerance of the transgenic rice plants to abiotic stresses were explored by measuring free proline (Pro) and soluble sugar contents in WT and transgenic plants. Accumulation of Pro and soluble sugars was positively correlated with OsNAC5 expression levels. The less accumulation of Pro in RNAi lines may be accounted for by inhibition of Pro synthesis and transport at transcriptional levels. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of OsNAC5 enhanced and reduced accumulation of malondialdehyde and H2O2, suggesting that knockdown of OsNAC5 renders RNAi plants more susceptible to oxidative damage. The RNAi lines displayed higher Na+/K+ ratio due to greater accumulation of Na+ ions than WT under salt stress conditions, and expression of genes encoding tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter was lower in RNAi lines than in WT under both control and salt-stressed conditions. Seed germination of RNAi and overexpression plants was more and less inhibited by salt and mannitol than that of WT, respectively. Seed germination of overexpression and RNAi plants was more and less sensitive than that of WT to ABA. These findings highlight the important role of OsNAC5 played in the tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress by regulating downstream targets associated with accumulation of compatible solutes, Na+ ions, H2O2 and malondialdehyde.
subject
0Abscisic acid
1Abscisic Acid - pharmacology
2Adaptation, Physiological - genetics
3Agriculture
4Arabidopsis - genetics
5Arabidopsis - growth & development
6Arabidopsis - physiology
7Biological and medical sciences
8Biomedical and Life Sciences
9Biotechnology
10Carbohydrates - analysis
11Cold Temperature
12Drought
13Droughts
14Ecology
15Food
16Forestry
17Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
18Gene Expression Regulation, Plant - physiology
19Genes
20Genetically engineered foods
21Germination
22Germination - physiology
23Hydrogen Peroxide - analysis
24Hydrogen Peroxide - metabolism
25Life Sciences
26Malondialdehyde - analysis
27Malondialdehyde - metabolism
28Mannitol - pharmacology
29Original Article
30Oryza - genetics
31Oryza - growth & development
32Oryza - physiology
33Oxidative stress
34Physiological aspects
35Plant Proteins - genetics
36Plant Proteins - metabolism
37Plant Sciences
38Plants
39Plants, Genetically Modified - genetics
40Plants, Genetically Modified - growth & development
41Plants, Genetically Modified - physiology
42Potassium - analysis
43Potassium - metabolism
44Proline - analysis
45Proline - metabolism
46Recombinant Fusion Proteins
47Rice
48RNA Interference
49RNA, Plant - genetics
50Salt tolerance
51Seedlings
52Seedlings - genetics
53Seedlings - growth & development
54Seedlings - physiology
55Seeds - genetics
56Seeds - physiology
57Sodium - analysis
58Sodium - metabolism
59Sodium Chloride - pharmacology
60Stress (Psychology)
61Stress, Physiological
62Sugars
63Table salt
64Transcription Factors - genetics
65Transcription Factors - metabolism
66Transgenic plants
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titlePhysiological mechanisms underlying OsNAC5-dependent tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress
authorSong, Shi-Yong ; Chen, Ying ; Chen, Jie ; Dai, Xiao-Yan ; Zhang, Wen-Hao
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1Abscisic Acid - pharmacology
2Adaptation, Physiological - genetics
3Agriculture
4Arabidopsis - genetics
5Arabidopsis - growth & development
6Arabidopsis - physiology
7Biological and medical sciences
8Biomedical and Life Sciences
9Biotechnology
10Carbohydrates - analysis
11Cold Temperature
12Drought
13Droughts
14Ecology
15Food
16Forestry
17Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
18Gene Expression Regulation, Plant - physiology
19Genes
20Genetically engineered foods
21Germination
22Germination - physiology
23Hydrogen Peroxide - analysis
24Hydrogen Peroxide - metabolism
25Life Sciences
26Malondialdehyde - analysis
27Malondialdehyde - metabolism
28Mannitol - pharmacology
29Original Article
30Oryza - genetics
31Oryza - growth & development
32Oryza - physiology
33Oxidative stress
34Physiological aspects
35Plant Proteins - genetics
36Plant Proteins - metabolism
37Plant Sciences
38Plants
39Plants, Genetically Modified - genetics
40Plants, Genetically Modified - growth & development
41Plants, Genetically Modified - physiology
42Potassium - analysis
43Potassium - metabolism
44Proline - analysis
45Proline - metabolism
46Recombinant Fusion Proteins
47Rice
48RNA Interference
49RNA, Plant - genetics
50Salt tolerance
51Seedlings
52Seedlings - genetics
53Seedlings - growth & development
54Seedlings - physiology
55Seeds - genetics
56Seeds - physiology
57Sodium - analysis
58Sodium - metabolism
59Sodium Chloride - pharmacology
60Stress (Psychology)
61Stress, Physiological
62Sugars
63Table salt
64Transcription Factors - genetics
65Transcription Factors - metabolism
66Transgenic plants
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abstractTo understand the functions of transcription factor OsNAC5 in response to abiotic stress, we generated transgenic rice plants with knockdown OsNAC5 by RNA-interfered (RNAi) and overexpressing OsNAC5, and investigated the effects of cold, drought and salt stress on wild-type (WT), RNAi and overexpression rice lines. Our results demonstrated that RNAi lines became less tolerant to these stresses than WT plants, while overexpression of OsNAC5 in Arabidopsis and rice enhanced tolerance to these stresses. The mechanisms underlying the changes in tolerance of the transgenic rice plants to abiotic stresses were explored by measuring free proline (Pro) and soluble sugar contents in WT and transgenic plants. Accumulation of Pro and soluble sugars was positively correlated with OsNAC5 expression levels. The less accumulation of Pro in RNAi lines may be accounted for by inhibition of Pro synthesis and transport at transcriptional levels. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of OsNAC5 enhanced and reduced accumulation of malondialdehyde and H2O2, suggesting that knockdown of OsNAC5 renders RNAi plants more susceptible to oxidative damage. The RNAi lines displayed higher Na+/K+ ratio due to greater accumulation of Na+ ions than WT under salt stress conditions, and expression of genes encoding tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter was lower in RNAi lines than in WT under both control and salt-stressed conditions. Seed germination of RNAi and overexpression plants was more and less inhibited by salt and mannitol than that of WT, respectively. Seed germination of overexpression and RNAi plants was more and less sensitive than that of WT to ABA. These findings highlight the important role of OsNAC5 played in the tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stress by regulating downstream targets associated with accumulation of compatible solutes, Na+ ions, H2O2 and malondialdehyde.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
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pmid21448719
doi10.1007/s00425-011-1403-2