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Adolescence and the social determinants of health

Summary The health of adolescents is strongly affected by social factors at personal, family, community, and national levels. Nations present young people with structures of opportunity as they grow up. Since health and health behaviours correspond strongly from adolescence into adult life, the way... Full description

Journal Title: The Lancet (British edition) 2012, Vol.379 (9826), p.1641-1652
Main Author: Viner, Russell M, Prof
Other Authors: Ozer, Elizabeth M, PhD , Denny, Simon, PhD , Marmot, Michael, Prof , Resnick, Michael, Prof , Fatusi, Adesegun, PhD , Currie, Candace, Prof
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Kidlington: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0140-6736
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1017964737
title: Adolescence and the social determinants of health
format: Article
creator:
  • Viner, Russell M, Prof
  • Ozer, Elizabeth M, PhD
  • Denny, Simon, PhD
  • Marmot, Michael, Prof
  • Resnick, Michael, Prof
  • Fatusi, Adesegun, PhD
  • Currie, Candace, Prof
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Adolescent
  • Adolescents
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Brain
  • Child
  • Economic development
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Educational Status
  • General aspects
  • Health aspects
  • Health Behavior
  • Health education
  • Health Status
  • Humans
  • Internal Medicine
  • Intervention
  • Medical sciences
  • Miscellaneous
  • population levels
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Reviews
  • Risk reduction
  • Schools
  • Social Environment
  • Social Support
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Teenagers
  • Usage
  • Young Adult
  • Youth
ispartof: The Lancet (British edition), 2012, Vol.379 (9826), p.1641-1652
description: Summary The health of adolescents is strongly affected by social factors at personal, family, community, and national levels. Nations present young people with structures of opportunity as they grow up. Since health and health behaviours correspond strongly from adolescence into adult life, the way that these social determinants affect adolescent health are crucial to the health of the whole population and the economic development of nations. During adolescence, developmental effects related to puberty and brain development lead to new sets of behaviours and capacities that enable transitions in family, peer, and educational domains, and in health behaviours. These transitions modify childhood trajectories towards health and wellbeing and are modified by economic and social factors within countries, leading to inequalities. We review existing data on the effects of social determinants on health in adolescence, and present findings from country-level ecological analyses on the health of young people aged 10–24 years. The strongest determinants of adolescent health worldwide are structural factors such as national wealth, income inequality, and access to education. Furthermore, safe and supportive families, safe and supportive schools, together with positive and supportive peers are crucial to helping young people develop to their full potential and attain the best health in the transition to adulthood. Improving adolescent health worldwide requires improving young people's daily life with families and peers and in schools, addressing risk and protective factors in the social environment at a population level, and focusing on factors that are protective across various health outcomes. The most effective interventions are probably structural changes to improve access to education and employment for young people and to reduce the risk of transport-related injury.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0140-6736
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0140-6736
  • 1474-547X
url: Link


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descriptionSummary The health of adolescents is strongly affected by social factors at personal, family, community, and national levels. Nations present young people with structures of opportunity as they grow up. Since health and health behaviours correspond strongly from adolescence into adult life, the way that these social determinants affect adolescent health are crucial to the health of the whole population and the economic development of nations. During adolescence, developmental effects related to puberty and brain development lead to new sets of behaviours and capacities that enable transitions in family, peer, and educational domains, and in health behaviours. These transitions modify childhood trajectories towards health and wellbeing and are modified by economic and social factors within countries, leading to inequalities. We review existing data on the effects of social determinants on health in adolescence, and present findings from country-level ecological analyses on the health of young people aged 10–24 years. The strongest determinants of adolescent health worldwide are structural factors such as national wealth, income inequality, and access to education. Furthermore, safe and supportive families, safe and supportive schools, together with positive and supportive peers are crucial to helping young people develop to their full potential and attain the best health in the transition to adulthood. Improving adolescent health worldwide requires improving young people's daily life with families and peers and in schools, addressing risk and protective factors in the social environment at a population level, and focusing on factors that are protective across various health outcomes. The most effective interventions are probably structural changes to improve access to education and employment for young people and to reduce the risk of transport-related injury.
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subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Adolescent ; Adolescents ; Biological and medical sciences ; Brain ; Child ; Economic development ; Economics ; Education ; Educational Status ; General aspects ; Health aspects ; Health Behavior ; Health education ; Health Status ; Humans ; Internal Medicine ; Intervention ; Medical sciences ; Miscellaneous ; population levels ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Reviews ; Risk reduction ; Schools ; Social Environment ; Social Support ; Socioeconomic Factors ; Teenagers ; Usage ; Young Adult ; Youth
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descriptionSummary The health of adolescents is strongly affected by social factors at personal, family, community, and national levels. Nations present young people with structures of opportunity as they grow up. Since health and health behaviours correspond strongly from adolescence into adult life, the way that these social determinants affect adolescent health are crucial to the health of the whole population and the economic development of nations. During adolescence, developmental effects related to puberty and brain development lead to new sets of behaviours and capacities that enable transitions in family, peer, and educational domains, and in health behaviours. These transitions modify childhood trajectories towards health and wellbeing and are modified by economic and social factors within countries, leading to inequalities. We review existing data on the effects of social determinants on health in adolescence, and present findings from country-level ecological analyses on the health of young people aged 10–24 years. The strongest determinants of adolescent health worldwide are structural factors such as national wealth, income inequality, and access to education. Furthermore, safe and supportive families, safe and supportive schools, together with positive and supportive peers are crucial to helping young people develop to their full potential and attain the best health in the transition to adulthood. Improving adolescent health worldwide requires improving young people's daily life with families and peers and in schools, addressing risk and protective factors in the social environment at a population level, and focusing on factors that are protective across various health outcomes. The most effective interventions are probably structural changes to improve access to education and employment for young people and to reduce the risk of transport-related injury.
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authorViner, Russell M, Prof ; Ozer, Elizabeth M, PhD ; Denny, Simon, PhD ; Marmot, Michael, Prof ; Resnick, Michael, Prof ; Fatusi, Adesegun, PhD ; Currie, Candace, Prof
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abstractSummary The health of adolescents is strongly affected by social factors at personal, family, community, and national levels. Nations present young people with structures of opportunity as they grow up. Since health and health behaviours correspond strongly from adolescence into adult life, the way that these social determinants affect adolescent health are crucial to the health of the whole population and the economic development of nations. During adolescence, developmental effects related to puberty and brain development lead to new sets of behaviours and capacities that enable transitions in family, peer, and educational domains, and in health behaviours. These transitions modify childhood trajectories towards health and wellbeing and are modified by economic and social factors within countries, leading to inequalities. We review existing data on the effects of social determinants on health in adolescence, and present findings from country-level ecological analyses on the health of young people aged 10–24 years. The strongest determinants of adolescent health worldwide are structural factors such as national wealth, income inequality, and access to education. Furthermore, safe and supportive families, safe and supportive schools, together with positive and supportive peers are crucial to helping young people develop to their full potential and attain the best health in the transition to adulthood. Improving adolescent health worldwide requires improving young people's daily life with families and peers and in schools, addressing risk and protective factors in the social environment at a population level, and focusing on factors that are protective across various health outcomes. The most effective interventions are probably structural changes to improve access to education and employment for young people and to reduce the risk of transport-related injury.
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