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Effect of whole grains on markers of subclinical inflammation

The reduction of subclinical inflammation has been suggested as a potential mechanism to explain the favorable association between whole‐grain consumption and reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. This review examines evidence for the effects of whole‐grain consumpt... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition reviews 2012, Vol.70 (7), p.387-396
Main Author: Lefevre, Michael
Other Authors: Jonnalagadda, Satya
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Malden, USA: Blackwell Publishing Inc
ID: ISSN: 0029-6643
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title: Effect of whole grains on markers of subclinical inflammation
format: Article
creator:
  • Lefevre, Michael
  • Jonnalagadda, Satya
subjects:
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomarkers
  • Biomarkers - blood
  • C-reactive protein
  • C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Control
  • Diet
  • Edible Grain
  • Epidemiology
  • Feeding. Feeding behavior
  • Functional foods & nutraceuticals
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Grain
  • Health aspects
  • Humans
  • Inflammation
  • Inflammation - blood
  • Inflammation - metabolism
  • Interleukin-6 - metabolism
  • interleukin‐6
  • Prevention
  • Proteins
  • Risk Factors
  • Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems
  • whole grains
ispartof: Nutrition reviews, 2012, Vol.70 (7), p.387-396
description: The reduction of subclinical inflammation has been suggested as a potential mechanism to explain the favorable association between whole‐grain consumption and reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. This review examines evidence for the effects of whole‐grain consumption on markers of subclinical inflammation derived from 13 epidemiological and 5 interventional studies retrieved from a search of the PubMed database. Epidemiological studies provide reasonable support for an association between diets high in whole grains and lower C‐reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. After adjusting for other dietary factors, each serving of whole grains is estimated to reduce CRP concentrations by approximately 7%. In contrast to epidemiological studies, interventional studies do not demonstrate a clear effect of increased whole‐grain consumption on CRP or other markers of inflammation. Issues related to insufficient length of intervention, extent of dietary control, population selection, types of whole grains, and lack of a direct anti‐inflammatory effect may underlie these discrepant findings. Additional carefully controlled interventional studies are needed to clarify the effects of whole grains on subclinical inflammation.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-6643
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-6643
  • 1753-4887
url: Link


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descriptionThe reduction of subclinical inflammation has been suggested as a potential mechanism to explain the favorable association between whole‐grain consumption and reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. This review examines evidence for the effects of whole‐grain consumption on markers of subclinical inflammation derived from 13 epidemiological and 5 interventional studies retrieved from a search of the PubMed database. Epidemiological studies provide reasonable support for an association between diets high in whole grains and lower C‐reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. After adjusting for other dietary factors, each serving of whole grains is estimated to reduce CRP concentrations by approximately 7%. In contrast to epidemiological studies, interventional studies do not demonstrate a clear effect of increased whole‐grain consumption on CRP or other markers of inflammation. Issues related to insufficient length of intervention, extent of dietary control, population selection, types of whole grains, and lack of a direct anti‐inflammatory effect may underlie these discrepant findings. Additional carefully controlled interventional studies are needed to clarify the effects of whole grains on subclinical inflammation.
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subjectBiological and medical sciences ; Biomarkers ; Biomarkers - blood ; C-reactive protein ; C-Reactive Protein - metabolism ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Control ; Diet ; Edible Grain ; Epidemiology ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; Functional foods & nutraceuticals ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Grain ; Health aspects ; Humans ; Inflammation ; Inflammation - blood ; Inflammation - metabolism ; Interleukin-6 - metabolism ; interleukin‐6 ; Prevention ; Proteins ; Risk Factors ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems ; whole grains
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abstractThe reduction of subclinical inflammation has been suggested as a potential mechanism to explain the favorable association between whole‐grain consumption and reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. This review examines evidence for the effects of whole‐grain consumption on markers of subclinical inflammation derived from 13 epidemiological and 5 interventional studies retrieved from a search of the PubMed database. Epidemiological studies provide reasonable support for an association between diets high in whole grains and lower C‐reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. After adjusting for other dietary factors, each serving of whole grains is estimated to reduce CRP concentrations by approximately 7%. In contrast to epidemiological studies, interventional studies do not demonstrate a clear effect of increased whole‐grain consumption on CRP or other markers of inflammation. Issues related to insufficient length of intervention, extent of dietary control, population selection, types of whole grains, and lack of a direct anti‐inflammatory effect may underlie these discrepant findings. Additional carefully controlled interventional studies are needed to clarify the effects of whole grains on subclinical inflammation.
copMalden, USA
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doi10.1111/j.1753-4887.2012.00487.x
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