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THE BIOGEOGRAPHY OF SULAWESI REVISITED: IS THERE EVIDENCE FOR A VICARIANT ORIGIN OF TAXA ON WALLACE'S "ANOMALOUS ISLAND"?

Sulawesi, the largest island in the Indonesian biodiversity hotspot region Wallacea, hosts a diverse endemic fauna whose origin has been debated for more than 150 years. We use a comparative approach based on dated phylogenies and geological constraints to test the role of vicariance versus dispersa... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2012, Vol.66 (7), p.2252-2271
Main Author: Stelbrink, Björn
Other Authors: Albrecht, Christian , Hall, Robert , von Rintelen, Thomas
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Malden, USA: Blackwell Publishing Inc
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22759300
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1023533844
title: THE BIOGEOGRAPHY OF SULAWESI REVISITED: IS THERE EVIDENCE FOR A VICARIANT ORIGIN OF TAXA ON WALLACE'S "ANOMALOUS ISLAND"?
format: Article
creator:
  • Stelbrink, Björn
  • Albrecht, Christian
  • Hall, Robert
  • von Rintelen, Thomas
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Bayes Theorem
  • Biodiversity
  • Biogeography
  • Calibration
  • Cell Nucleus - genetics
  • Datasets
  • Dispersal
  • Distribution
  • Ecosystem
  • Estimated taxes
  • Evolution
  • Evolution & development
  • Evolution, Molecular
  • Genetic Speciation
  • Geography
  • Geological Phenomena
  • Geology
  • Indonesia
  • invertebrates
  • Invertebrates - classification
  • Invertebrates - genetics
  • Islands
  • Mitochondria - genetics
  • molecular clock
  • Molecular clock (Genetics)
  • Origin of species
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Speciation
  • Taxa
  • Tectonics
  • Vertebrates
  • Vertebrates - classification
  • Vertebrates - genetics
  • Wallacea
ispartof: Evolution, 2012, Vol.66 (7), p.2252-2271
description: Sulawesi, the largest island in the Indonesian biodiversity hotspot region Wallacea, hosts a diverse endemic fauna whose origin has been debated for more than 150 years. We use a comparative approach based on dated phylogenies and geological constraints to test the role of vicariance versus dispersal in the origin of Sulawesi taxa. Most divergence time estimates for the split of Sulawesi lineages from their sister groups postdate relevant tectonic vicariant events, suggesting that the island was predominantly colonized by dispersal. Vicariance cannot be refuted for 20% of the analyzed taxa, though. Although vicariance across Wallace's Line was only supported for one arthropod taxon, divergence time estimates were consistent with a "tectonic dispersal" vicariance hypothesis from the East in three (invertebrate and vertebrate) taxa. Speciation on Sulawesi did not occur before the Miocene, which is consistent with geological evidence for more extensive land on the island from that time. The Pliocene onset of periodic sea-level changes may have played a role in increasing the potential for dispersal to Sulawesi. A more extensive taxon sampling in Wallacea will be crucial for refining our understanding of the region's biogeography and for testing hypotheses on the origin of taxa on its most important island.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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titleTHE BIOGEOGRAPHY OF SULAWESI REVISITED: IS THERE EVIDENCE FOR A VICARIANT ORIGIN OF TAXA ON WALLACE'S "ANOMALOUS ISLAND"?
creatorStelbrink, Björn ; Albrecht, Christian ; Hall, Robert ; von Rintelen, Thomas
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descriptionSulawesi, the largest island in the Indonesian biodiversity hotspot region Wallacea, hosts a diverse endemic fauna whose origin has been debated for more than 150 years. We use a comparative approach based on dated phylogenies and geological constraints to test the role of vicariance versus dispersal in the origin of Sulawesi taxa. Most divergence time estimates for the split of Sulawesi lineages from their sister groups postdate relevant tectonic vicariant events, suggesting that the island was predominantly colonized by dispersal. Vicariance cannot be refuted for 20% of the analyzed taxa, though. Although vicariance across Wallace's Line was only supported for one arthropod taxon, divergence time estimates were consistent with a "tectonic dispersal" vicariance hypothesis from the East in three (invertebrate and vertebrate) taxa. Speciation on Sulawesi did not occur before the Miocene, which is consistent with geological evidence for more extensive land on the island from that time. The Pliocene onset of periodic sea-level changes may have played a role in increasing the potential for dispersal to Sulawesi. A more extensive taxon sampling in Wallacea will be crucial for refining our understanding of the region's biogeography and for testing hypotheses on the origin of taxa on its most important island.
editionReceived April 6, 2011, Accepted January 10, 2012, Data Archived: Dryad: doi:10.5061/dryad.7nk1nc63
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subjectAnimals ; Bayes Theorem ; Biodiversity ; Biogeography ; Calibration ; Cell Nucleus - genetics ; Datasets ; Dispersal ; Distribution ; Ecosystem ; Estimated taxes ; Evolution ; Evolution & development ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genetic Speciation ; Geography ; Geological Phenomena ; Geology ; Indonesia ; invertebrates ; Invertebrates - classification ; Invertebrates - genetics ; Islands ; Mitochondria - genetics ; molecular clock ; Molecular clock (Genetics) ; Origin of species ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Speciation ; Taxa ; Tectonics ; Vertebrates ; Vertebrates - classification ; Vertebrates - genetics ; Wallacea
ispartofEvolution, 2012, Vol.66 (7), p.2252-2271
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9Ecosystem
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titleTHE BIOGEOGRAPHY OF SULAWESI REVISITED: IS THERE EVIDENCE FOR A VICARIANT ORIGIN OF TAXA ON WALLACE'S "ANOMALOUS ISLAND"?
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8Distribution
9Ecosystem
10Estimated taxes
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29Speciation
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abstractSulawesi, the largest island in the Indonesian biodiversity hotspot region Wallacea, hosts a diverse endemic fauna whose origin has been debated for more than 150 years. We use a comparative approach based on dated phylogenies and geological constraints to test the role of vicariance versus dispersal in the origin of Sulawesi taxa. Most divergence time estimates for the split of Sulawesi lineages from their sister groups postdate relevant tectonic vicariant events, suggesting that the island was predominantly colonized by dispersal. Vicariance cannot be refuted for 20% of the analyzed taxa, though. Although vicariance across Wallace's Line was only supported for one arthropod taxon, divergence time estimates were consistent with a "tectonic dispersal" vicariance hypothesis from the East in three (invertebrate and vertebrate) taxa. Speciation on Sulawesi did not occur before the Miocene, which is consistent with geological evidence for more extensive land on the island from that time. The Pliocene onset of periodic sea-level changes may have played a role in increasing the potential for dispersal to Sulawesi. A more extensive taxon sampling in Wallacea will be crucial for refining our understanding of the region's biogeography and for testing hypotheses on the origin of taxa on its most important island.
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editionReceived April 6, 2011, Accepted January 10, 2012, Data Archived: Dryad: doi:10.5061/dryad.7nk1nc63
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