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Lifelong education for older adults in Malta: Current trends and future visions

With European demographic developments causing a decline of the available workforce in the foreseeable future and the unsustainability of dominant pay-as-you-go pension systems (where contributions from the current workforce sustain pensioners), governments need to come up with strategies to deal wi... Full description

Journal Title: International review of education 2012, Vol.58 (2), p.271-292
Main Author: Formosa, Marvin
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands
ID: ISSN: 0020-8566
Zum Text:
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1033284090
title: Lifelong education for older adults in Malta: Current trends and future visions
format: Article
creator:
  • Formosa, Marvin
subjects:
  • Adult education
  • Age discrimination
  • Aged
  • Ageing
  • Article
  • Continuing education
  • Education
  • Gender equality
  • general
  • Gerontology
  • Government policy
  • International and Comparative Education
  • Malta
  • Old age policy
  • Older workers
  • Pensions
  • Retirees
  • Sex discrimination
ispartof: International review of education, 2012, Vol.58 (2), p.271-292
description: With European demographic developments causing a decline of the available workforce in the foreseeable future and the unsustainability of dominant pay-as-you-go pension systems (where contributions from the current workforce sustain pensioners), governments need to come up with strategies to deal with this upcoming challenge and to adjust their policies. Based on a study carried out between September 2009 and May 2010, this article evaluates the policies guiding late-life education in Malta, as well as the local plethora of learning opportunities for older adult education, and participation rates. The Maltese government is committed to supporting the inclusion of older persons (aged 60+) in lifelong education policies and programmes, to the extent that local studies have uncovered a recent rise in the overall participation of older adults in formal, non-formal and informal areas of learning. While the present and future prospects for late-life education in Malta seem promising, a critical scrutiny of present ideologies and trends finds the field to be no more than seductive rhetoric. Though the coordination of late-life education in Malta does result in various social benefits to older learners and Maltese society in general, it also occurs within five intersecting lines of inequality – namely an economic rationale, elitism, gender bias, the urban-rural divide and third ageism. This article ends by proposing policy recommendations for the future of late-life education.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0020-8566
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0020-8566
  • 1573-0638
url: Link


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descriptionWith European demographic developments causing a decline of the available workforce in the foreseeable future and the unsustainability of dominant pay-as-you-go pension systems (where contributions from the current workforce sustain pensioners), governments need to come up with strategies to deal with this upcoming challenge and to adjust their policies. Based on a study carried out between September 2009 and May 2010, this article evaluates the policies guiding late-life education in Malta, as well as the local plethora of learning opportunities for older adult education, and participation rates. The Maltese government is committed to supporting the inclusion of older persons (aged 60+) in lifelong education policies and programmes, to the extent that local studies have uncovered a recent rise in the overall participation of older adults in formal, non-formal and informal areas of learning. While the present and future prospects for late-life education in Malta seem promising, a critical scrutiny of present ideologies and trends finds the field to be no more than seductive rhetoric. Though the coordination of late-life education in Malta does result in various social benefits to older learners and Maltese society in general, it also occurs within five intersecting lines of inequality – namely an economic rationale, elitism, gender bias, the urban-rural divide and third ageism. This article ends by proposing policy recommendations for the future of late-life education.
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subjectAdult education ; Age discrimination ; Aged ; Ageing ; Article ; Continuing education ; Education ; Gender equality ; general ; Gerontology ; Government policy ; International and Comparative Education ; Malta ; Old age policy ; Older workers ; Pensions ; Retirees ; Sex discrimination
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abstractWith European demographic developments causing a decline of the available workforce in the foreseeable future and the unsustainability of dominant pay-as-you-go pension systems (where contributions from the current workforce sustain pensioners), governments need to come up with strategies to deal with this upcoming challenge and to adjust their policies. Based on a study carried out between September 2009 and May 2010, this article evaluates the policies guiding late-life education in Malta, as well as the local plethora of learning opportunities for older adult education, and participation rates. The Maltese government is committed to supporting the inclusion of older persons (aged 60+) in lifelong education policies and programmes, to the extent that local studies have uncovered a recent rise in the overall participation of older adults in formal, non-formal and informal areas of learning. While the present and future prospects for late-life education in Malta seem promising, a critical scrutiny of present ideologies and trends finds the field to be no more than seductive rhetoric. Though the coordination of late-life education in Malta does result in various social benefits to older learners and Maltese society in general, it also occurs within five intersecting lines of inequality – namely an economic rationale, elitism, gender bias, the urban-rural divide and third ageism. This article ends by proposing policy recommendations for the future of late-life education.
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