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Fruit and vegetable purchasing and the relative density of healthy and unhealthy food stores: evidence from an Australian multilevel study

Background Evidence of a relationship between residential retail food environments and diet-related outcomes is inconsistent. One reason for this may be that food environments are typically defined in terms of the absolute number of particular store types in an area, whereas a measure of the relativ... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979) 2013-03, Vol.67 (3), p.231-149
Main Author: Mason, Kate E
Other Authors: Bentley, Rebecca J , Kavanagh, Anne M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0143-005X
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title: Fruit and vegetable purchasing and the relative density of healthy and unhealthy food stores: evidence from an Australian multilevel study
format: Article
creator:
  • Mason, Kate E
  • Bentley, Rebecca J
  • Kavanagh, Anne M
subjects:
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Australia
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Commerce - methods
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Demographic aspects
  • Diet
  • Family Characteristics
  • Female
  • Food
  • Food buying
  • Food economics
  • Food intake
  • Food Preferences
  • Food stores
  • Food Supply - standards
  • Fruit - economics
  • Fruit - supply & distribution
  • Fruits
  • General aspects
  • Grocery industry
  • Health Behaviour
  • Health outcomes
  • Health Status Indicators
  • Households
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • Multilevel Modelling
  • Natural foods
  • Neighborhoods
  • Obesity
  • Population Density
  • Prevalence
  • Psychosocial Deprivation
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Purchasing
  • Regression Analysis
  • Research
  • Research report
  • Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
  • Social Epidemiology
  • Studies
  • Supermarkets
  • Vegetables
  • Vegetables - economics
  • Vegetables - supply & distribution
  • Young Adult
ispartof: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979), 2013-03, Vol.67 (3), p.231-149
description: Background Evidence of a relationship between residential retail food environments and diet-related outcomes is inconsistent. One reason for this may be that food environments are typically defined in terms of the absolute number of particular store types in an area, whereas a measure of the relative number of healthy and unhealthy stores may be more appropriate. Methods Using cross-sectional data from the VicLANES study conducted in Melbourne, Australia, multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the independent associations between absolute measures (numbers of healthy and unhealthy stores) and a relative measure (relative density of healthy stores) of the food environment, and self-reported variety of fruit and vegetable purchasing in local households. Purchasing behaviour was measured as the odds of purchasing above the median level of fruit and vegetables. Results Compared to households in areas where healthy food stores made up no more than 10% of all healthy and unhealthy stores, households in areas with 10.1–15.0% healthy food stores and >15% healthy stores had increased odds of healthier purchasing (OR=1.48 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.96) and OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91), respectively). There was less evidence of an association between absolute numbers of healthy or unhealthy stores and fruit and vegetable purchasing. Conclusions We found strong evidence of healthier fruit and vegetable purchasing in households located in areas where the proportion of food stores that were healthy was greater. Policies aimed at improving the balance between healthy and unhealthy stores within areas may therefore be effective in promoting greater consumption of fruit and vegetables.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0143-005X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-005X
  • 1470-2738
url: Link


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descriptionBackground Evidence of a relationship between residential retail food environments and diet-related outcomes is inconsistent. One reason for this may be that food environments are typically defined in terms of the absolute number of particular store types in an area, whereas a measure of the relative number of healthy and unhealthy stores may be more appropriate. Methods Using cross-sectional data from the VicLANES study conducted in Melbourne, Australia, multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the independent associations between absolute measures (numbers of healthy and unhealthy stores) and a relative measure (relative density of healthy stores) of the food environment, and self-reported variety of fruit and vegetable purchasing in local households. Purchasing behaviour was measured as the odds of purchasing above the median level of fruit and vegetables. Results Compared to households in areas where healthy food stores made up no more than 10% of all healthy and unhealthy stores, households in areas with 10.1–15.0% healthy food stores and >15% healthy stores had increased odds of healthier purchasing (OR=1.48 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.96) and OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91), respectively). There was less evidence of an association between absolute numbers of healthy or unhealthy stores and fruit and vegetable purchasing. Conclusions We found strong evidence of healthier fruit and vegetable purchasing in households located in areas where the proportion of food stores that were healthy was greater. Policies aimed at improving the balance between healthy and unhealthy stores within areas may therefore be effective in promoting greater consumption of fruit and vegetables.
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subjectAdolescent ; Adult ; Aged ; Australia ; Biological and medical sciences ; Commerce - methods ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Demographic aspects ; Diet ; Family Characteristics ; Female ; Food ; Food buying ; Food economics ; Food intake ; Food Preferences ; Food stores ; Food Supply - standards ; Fruit - economics ; Fruit - supply & distribution ; Fruits ; General aspects ; Grocery industry ; Health Behaviour ; Health outcomes ; Health Status Indicators ; Households ; Humans ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; Multilevel Modelling ; Natural foods ; Neighborhoods ; Obesity ; Population Density ; Prevalence ; Psychosocial Deprivation ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Purchasing ; Regression Analysis ; Research ; Research report ; Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data ; Social Epidemiology ; Studies ; Supermarkets ; Vegetables ; Vegetables - economics ; Vegetables - supply & distribution ; Young Adult
ispartofJournal of epidemiology and community health (1979), 2013-03, Vol.67 (3), p.231-149
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descriptionBackground Evidence of a relationship between residential retail food environments and diet-related outcomes is inconsistent. One reason for this may be that food environments are typically defined in terms of the absolute number of particular store types in an area, whereas a measure of the relative number of healthy and unhealthy stores may be more appropriate. Methods Using cross-sectional data from the VicLANES study conducted in Melbourne, Australia, multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the independent associations between absolute measures (numbers of healthy and unhealthy stores) and a relative measure (relative density of healthy stores) of the food environment, and self-reported variety of fruit and vegetable purchasing in local households. Purchasing behaviour was measured as the odds of purchasing above the median level of fruit and vegetables. Results Compared to households in areas where healthy food stores made up no more than 10% of all healthy and unhealthy stores, households in areas with 10.1–15.0% healthy food stores and >15% healthy stores had increased odds of healthier purchasing (OR=1.48 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.96) and OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91), respectively). There was less evidence of an association between absolute numbers of healthy or unhealthy stores and fruit and vegetable purchasing. Conclusions We found strong evidence of healthier fruit and vegetable purchasing in households located in areas where the proportion of food stores that were healthy was greater. Policies aimed at improving the balance between healthy and unhealthy stores within areas may therefore be effective in promoting greater consumption of fruit and vegetables.
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atitleFruit and vegetable purchasing and the relative density of healthy and unhealthy food stores: evidence from an Australian multilevel study
jtitleJournal of epidemiology and community health (1979)
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abstractBackground Evidence of a relationship between residential retail food environments and diet-related outcomes is inconsistent. One reason for this may be that food environments are typically defined in terms of the absolute number of particular store types in an area, whereas a measure of the relative number of healthy and unhealthy stores may be more appropriate. Methods Using cross-sectional data from the VicLANES study conducted in Melbourne, Australia, multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the independent associations between absolute measures (numbers of healthy and unhealthy stores) and a relative measure (relative density of healthy stores) of the food environment, and self-reported variety of fruit and vegetable purchasing in local households. Purchasing behaviour was measured as the odds of purchasing above the median level of fruit and vegetables. Results Compared to households in areas where healthy food stores made up no more than 10% of all healthy and unhealthy stores, households in areas with 10.1–15.0% healthy food stores and >15% healthy stores had increased odds of healthier purchasing (OR=1.48 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.96) and OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91), respectively). There was less evidence of an association between absolute numbers of healthy or unhealthy stores and fruit and vegetable purchasing. Conclusions We found strong evidence of healthier fruit and vegetable purchasing in households located in areas where the proportion of food stores that were healthy was greater. Policies aimed at improving the balance between healthy and unhealthy stores within areas may therefore be effective in promoting greater consumption of fruit and vegetables.
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