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Dietary consumption and diet diversity and risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the South and East China case–control study

Background: The epidemiologic evidence on the role of dietary consumption on the risk of bladder cancer in the Chinese population is limited. We investigated the role of dietary consumption and diet diversity on the risk of developing bladder cancer within a Chinese population. Methods: A case–contr... Full description

Journal Title: Cancer causes & control 2013, Vol.24 (5), p.885-895
Main Author: Isa, F
Other Authors: Xie, L.P , Hu, Z , Zhong, Z , Hemelt, M , Reulen, R.C , Wong, Y.C , Tam, P.C , Yang, K , Chai, C , Zeng, X , Deng, Y , Zhong, W.D , Zeegers, M.P.A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0957-5243
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23412804
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title: Dietary consumption and diet diversity and risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the South and East China case–control study
format: Article
creator:
  • Isa, F
  • Xie, L.P
  • Hu, Z
  • Zhong, Z
  • Hemelt, M
  • Reulen, R.C
  • Wong, Y.C
  • Tam, P.C
  • Yang, K
  • Chai, C
  • Zeng, X
  • Deng, Y
  • Zhong, W.D
  • Zeegers, M.P.A
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Biomedicine
  • Bladder cancer
  • Cancer Research
  • Case control studies
  • China
  • Citrus
  • Complications and side effects
  • Development and progression
  • Diet
  • Diet consumption
  • Diet diversity
  • Epidemiology
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Female
  • FLUID INTAKE
  • Food
  • Food intake
  • Fruit
  • FRUIT CONSUMPTION
  • Fruits
  • GASTRIC-CANCER
  • general
  • Hematology
  • Humans
  • Leafy vegetables
  • Male
  • MEAT INTAKE
  • Meat Products
  • Meats
  • Middle Aged
  • NETHERLANDS COHORT
  • NUTRITION
  • Oncology
  • Original Paper
  • Public Health
  • Risk Factors
  • Solanum tuberosum
  • Tobacco smoking
  • UNITED-STATES
  • Urinary bladder
  • Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
  • UROTHELIAL CANCER
  • VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION
  • Vegetables
  • VITAMIN-C
ispartof: Cancer causes & control, 2013, Vol.24 (5), p.885-895
description: Background: The epidemiologic evidence on the role of dietary consumption on the risk of bladder cancer in the Chinese population is limited. We investigated the role of dietary consumption and diet diversity on the risk of developing bladder cancer within a Chinese population. Methods: A case–control study of 487 cases and 469 controls was conducted in four hospitals in China. A food frequency questionnaire was used to gather information on the consumption of 35 food items. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) for the relationship between dietary factors, dietary diversity scores, and bladder cancer. Results: The ORs of bladder cancer for red meat (OR = 1.8, 95 % CI: 1.1–3.0;ptrend = 0.01), organ meat (OR = 1.6, 95 % CI:0.9–2.9;ptrend = 0.04), leafy vegetables (OR = 2.9, 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4;ptrend = 0.003), bulb vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.3–4.0;ptrend = 0.003), and preserved vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.2–4.2;ptrend = 0.02) were significantly increased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. The ORs for white fresh fish (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.3–0.9;ptrend = 0.004), citrus fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.8;ptrend = 0.007), stone fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), vine fruits (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.2–1.0;ptrend = 0.02), flower vegetables (OR = 0.3, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), potatoes (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.9;ptrend = 0.005), or dairy products (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.7;ptrend < 0.001) were significantly decreased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. Subjects with the highest total diet diversity (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–1.1;ptrend = 0.02) and fruit diversity (OR = 0.1, 95 % CI:0.0–0.3;ptrend < 0.001) had reduced ORs of and compared to subjects with the lowest diversity. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a diet with higher total diet diversity and in particular fruit diversity may reduce the risk of bladder cancer.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0957-5243
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0957-5243
  • 1573-7225
url: Link


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titleDietary consumption and diet diversity and risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the South and East China case–control study
creatorIsa, F ; Xie, L.P ; Hu, Z ; Zhong, Z ; Hemelt, M ; Reulen, R.C ; Wong, Y.C ; Tam, P.C ; Yang, K ; Chai, C ; Zeng, X ; Deng, Y ; Zhong, W.D ; Zeegers, M.P.A
creatorcontribIsa, F ; Xie, L.P ; Hu, Z ; Zhong, Z ; Hemelt, M ; Reulen, R.C ; Wong, Y.C ; Tam, P.C ; Yang, K ; Chai, C ; Zeng, X ; Deng, Y ; Zhong, W.D ; Zeegers, M.P.A
descriptionBackground: The epidemiologic evidence on the role of dietary consumption on the risk of bladder cancer in the Chinese population is limited. We investigated the role of dietary consumption and diet diversity on the risk of developing bladder cancer within a Chinese population. Methods: A case–control study of 487 cases and 469 controls was conducted in four hospitals in China. A food frequency questionnaire was used to gather information on the consumption of 35 food items. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) for the relationship between dietary factors, dietary diversity scores, and bladder cancer. Results: The ORs of bladder cancer for red meat (OR = 1.8, 95 % CI: 1.1–3.0;ptrend = 0.01), organ meat (OR = 1.6, 95 % CI:0.9–2.9;ptrend = 0.04), leafy vegetables (OR = 2.9, 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4;ptrend = 0.003), bulb vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.3–4.0;ptrend = 0.003), and preserved vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.2–4.2;ptrend = 0.02) were significantly increased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. The ORs for white fresh fish (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.3–0.9;ptrend = 0.004), citrus fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.8;ptrend = 0.007), stone fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), vine fruits (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.2–1.0;ptrend = 0.02), flower vegetables (OR = 0.3, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), potatoes (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.9;ptrend = 0.005), or dairy products (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.7;ptrend < 0.001) were significantly decreased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. Subjects with the highest total diet diversity (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–1.1;ptrend = 0.02) and fruit diversity (OR = 0.1, 95 % CI:0.0–0.3;ptrend < 0.001) had reduced ORs of and compared to subjects with the lowest diversity. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a diet with higher total diet diversity and in particular fruit diversity may reduce the risk of bladder cancer.
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languageeng
publisherDordrecht: Springer
subjectAdult ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Biomedicine ; Bladder cancer ; Cancer Research ; Case control studies ; China ; Citrus ; Complications and side effects ; Development and progression ; Diet ; Diet consumption ; Diet diversity ; Epidemiology ; Feeding Behavior ; Female ; FLUID INTAKE ; Food ; Food intake ; Fruit ; FRUIT CONSUMPTION ; Fruits ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; general ; Hematology ; Humans ; Leafy vegetables ; Male ; MEAT INTAKE ; Meat Products ; Meats ; Middle Aged ; NETHERLANDS COHORT ; NUTRITION ; Oncology ; Original Paper ; Public Health ; Risk Factors ; Solanum tuberosum ; Tobacco smoking ; UNITED-STATES ; Urinary bladder ; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology ; UROTHELIAL CANCER ; VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION ; Vegetables ; VITAMIN-C
ispartofCancer causes & control, 2013, Vol.24 (5), p.885-895
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8Yang, K
9Chai, C
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13Zeegers, M.P.A
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0Dietary consumption and diet diversity and risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the South and East China case–control study
1Cancer causes & control
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0Cancer Causes Control
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descriptionBackground: The epidemiologic evidence on the role of dietary consumption on the risk of bladder cancer in the Chinese population is limited. We investigated the role of dietary consumption and diet diversity on the risk of developing bladder cancer within a Chinese population. Methods: A case–control study of 487 cases and 469 controls was conducted in four hospitals in China. A food frequency questionnaire was used to gather information on the consumption of 35 food items. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) for the relationship between dietary factors, dietary diversity scores, and bladder cancer. Results: The ORs of bladder cancer for red meat (OR = 1.8, 95 % CI: 1.1–3.0;ptrend = 0.01), organ meat (OR = 1.6, 95 % CI:0.9–2.9;ptrend = 0.04), leafy vegetables (OR = 2.9, 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4;ptrend = 0.003), bulb vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.3–4.0;ptrend = 0.003), and preserved vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.2–4.2;ptrend = 0.02) were significantly increased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. The ORs for white fresh fish (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.3–0.9;ptrend = 0.004), citrus fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.8;ptrend = 0.007), stone fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), vine fruits (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.2–1.0;ptrend = 0.02), flower vegetables (OR = 0.3, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), potatoes (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.9;ptrend = 0.005), or dairy products (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.7;ptrend < 0.001) were significantly decreased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. Subjects with the highest total diet diversity (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–1.1;ptrend = 0.02) and fruit diversity (OR = 0.1, 95 % CI:0.0–0.3;ptrend < 0.001) had reduced ORs of and compared to subjects with the lowest diversity. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a diet with higher total diet diversity and in particular fruit diversity may reduce the risk of bladder cancer.
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24GASTRIC-CANCER
25general
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30MEAT INTAKE
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38Public Health
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44Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
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titleDietary consumption and diet diversity and risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the South and East China case–control study
authorIsa, F ; Xie, L.P ; Hu, Z ; Zhong, Z ; Hemelt, M ; Reulen, R.C ; Wong, Y.C ; Tam, P.C ; Yang, K ; Chai, C ; Zeng, X ; Deng, Y ; Zhong, W.D ; Zeegers, M.P.A
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10Complications and side effects
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abstractBackground: The epidemiologic evidence on the role of dietary consumption on the risk of bladder cancer in the Chinese population is limited. We investigated the role of dietary consumption and diet diversity on the risk of developing bladder cancer within a Chinese population. Methods: A case–control study of 487 cases and 469 controls was conducted in four hospitals in China. A food frequency questionnaire was used to gather information on the consumption of 35 food items. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) for the relationship between dietary factors, dietary diversity scores, and bladder cancer. Results: The ORs of bladder cancer for red meat (OR = 1.8, 95 % CI: 1.1–3.0;ptrend = 0.01), organ meat (OR = 1.6, 95 % CI:0.9–2.9;ptrend = 0.04), leafy vegetables (OR = 2.9, 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4;ptrend = 0.003), bulb vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.3–4.0;ptrend = 0.003), and preserved vegetables (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI: 1.2–4.2;ptrend = 0.02) were significantly increased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. The ORs for white fresh fish (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.3–0.9;ptrend = 0.004), citrus fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.8;ptrend = 0.007), stone fruits (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), vine fruits (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI:0.2–1.0;ptrend = 0.02), flower vegetables (OR = 0.3, 95 % CI:0.2–0.6;ptrend < 0.001), potatoes (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–0.9;ptrend = 0.005), or dairy products (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.3–0.7;ptrend < 0.001) were significantly decreased when comparing the highest to lowest level of consumption. Subjects with the highest total diet diversity (OR = 0.4, 95 % CI:0.2–1.1;ptrend = 0.02) and fruit diversity (OR = 0.1, 95 % CI:0.0–0.3;ptrend < 0.001) had reduced ORs of and compared to subjects with the lowest diversity. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a diet with higher total diet diversity and in particular fruit diversity may reduce the risk of bladder cancer.
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pmid23412804
doi10.1007/s10552-013-0165-5