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High Blood Pressure and Cerebral White Matter Lesion Progression in the General Population

High blood pressure is considered an important risk factor for cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) in the aging population. In a longitudinal population-based study of 665 nondemented persons, we investigated the longitudinal relationship of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pu... Full description

Journal Title: Hypertension (Dallas Tex. 1979), 2013, Vol.61 (6), p.1354-1359
Main Author: Verhaaren, Ben
Other Authors: Vernooij, Meike , Boer, Renske , Hofman, Bert , Niessen, Wiro , van der Lugt, Aad , Ikram, Arfan
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Hagerstown, MD: American Heart Association, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0194-911X
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1353039976
title: High Blood Pressure and Cerebral White Matter Lesion Progression in the General Population
format: Article
creator:
  • Verhaaren, Ben
  • Vernooij, Meike
  • Boer, Renske
  • Hofman, Bert
  • Niessen, Wiro
  • van der Lugt, Aad
  • Ikram, Arfan
subjects:
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Blood and lymphatic vessels
  • Blood Pressure - physiology
  • Brain - pathology
  • Cardiology. Vascular system
  • Disease Progression
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Hypertension - diagnosis
  • Hypertension - epidemiology
  • Hypertension - physiopathology
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Netherlands - epidemiology
  • Prevalence
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Severity of Illness Index
ispartof: Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. 1979), 2013, Vol.61 (6), p.1354-1359
description: High blood pressure is considered an important risk factor for cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) in the aging population. In a longitudinal population-based study of 665 nondemented persons, we investigated the longitudinal relationship of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure with annual progression of WMLs. Means of blood pressure were calculated over a 5-year period before longitudinal MRI scanning. WML progression was subsequently measured on 2 scans 3.5 years apart. We performed analyses with linear regression models and evaluated adjustments for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and baseline WML volume. In addition, we evaluated whether treatment of hypertension is related to less WML progression. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly associated with annual WML progression (regression coefficient [95% confidence interval], 0.08 [0.03; 0.14] mL/y and 0.09 [0.03; 0.15] mL/y per SD increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). Pulse pressure was also significantly associated with WML progression, but not independent from hypertension. After adjustment for baseline WML volume, only systolic blood pressure remained significantly associated0.05 (0.00; 0.09) mL/y per SD increase. People with uncontrolled untreated hypertension had significantly more WML progression than people with uncontrolled treated hypertension (difference [95% confidence interval], 0.12 [0.00; 0.23] mL/y). The present study further establishes high blood pressure to precede WMLs and implies that hypertension treatment could reduce WML progression in the general population.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0194-911X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0194-911X
  • 1524-4563
url: Link


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descriptionHigh blood pressure is considered an important risk factor for cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) in the aging population. In a longitudinal population-based study of 665 nondemented persons, we investigated the longitudinal relationship of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure with annual progression of WMLs. Means of blood pressure were calculated over a 5-year period before longitudinal MRI scanning. WML progression was subsequently measured on 2 scans 3.5 years apart. We performed analyses with linear regression models and evaluated adjustments for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and baseline WML volume. In addition, we evaluated whether treatment of hypertension is related to less WML progression. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly associated with annual WML progression (regression coefficient [95% confidence interval], 0.08 [0.03; 0.14] mL/y and 0.09 [0.03; 0.15] mL/y per SD increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). Pulse pressure was also significantly associated with WML progression, but not independent from hypertension. After adjustment for baseline WML volume, only systolic blood pressure remained significantly associated0.05 (0.00; 0.09) mL/y per SD increase. People with uncontrolled untreated hypertension had significantly more WML progression than people with uncontrolled treated hypertension (difference [95% confidence interval], 0.12 [0.00; 0.23] mL/y). The present study further establishes high blood pressure to precede WMLs and implies that hypertension treatment could reduce WML progression in the general population.
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abstractHigh blood pressure is considered an important risk factor for cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) in the aging population. In a longitudinal population-based study of 665 nondemented persons, we investigated the longitudinal relationship of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure with annual progression of WMLs. Means of blood pressure were calculated over a 5-year period before longitudinal MRI scanning. WML progression was subsequently measured on 2 scans 3.5 years apart. We performed analyses with linear regression models and evaluated adjustments for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and baseline WML volume. In addition, we evaluated whether treatment of hypertension is related to less WML progression. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly associated with annual WML progression (regression coefficient [95% confidence interval], 0.08 [0.03; 0.14] mL/y and 0.09 [0.03; 0.15] mL/y per SD increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). Pulse pressure was also significantly associated with WML progression, but not independent from hypertension. After adjustment for baseline WML volume, only systolic blood pressure remained significantly associated0.05 (0.00; 0.09) mL/y per SD increase. People with uncontrolled untreated hypertension had significantly more WML progression than people with uncontrolled treated hypertension (difference [95% confidence interval], 0.12 [0.00; 0.23] mL/y). The present study further establishes high blood pressure to precede WMLs and implies that hypertension treatment could reduce WML progression in the general population.
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doi10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00430
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