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Perceptions and acceptability of mHealth interventions for improving patient care at a community-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda: A mixed methods study

Mobile technologies for health (mHealth) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the developm... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS care 2013, Vol.25 (7), p.874-880
Main Author: Chang, Larry W.
Other Authors: Njie-Carr, Veronica , Kalenge, Sheila , Kelly, Jack F. , Bollinger, Robert C. , Alamo-Talisuna, Stella
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
HIV
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Abingdon: Routledge
ID: ISSN: 0954-0121
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1463023397
title: Perceptions and acceptability of mHealth interventions for improving patient care at a community-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda: A mixed methods study
format: Article
creator:
  • Chang, Larry W.
  • Njie-Carr, Veronica
  • Kalenge, Sheila
  • Kelly, Jack F.
  • Bollinger, Robert C.
  • Alamo-Talisuna, Stella
subjects:
  • Access
  • Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
  • Adult
  • AIDS
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Antiretroviral drugs
  • antiretroviral treatment
  • Article
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cell Phone
  • Clinics
  • Communications technology
  • Community Health Services - methods
  • Community Health Services - standards
  • community health workers
  • Community services
  • Confidentiality
  • Female
  • Focus Groups
  • Health care
  • Health Care Services
  • HIV
  • HIV Infections - therapy
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Human viral diseases
  • Humans
  • Immunodeficiencies
  • Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies
  • Immunopathology
  • Infectious diseases
  • Internet
  • Intervention
  • Interventions
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Job Security
  • Male
  • Medical Decision Making
  • Medical personnel
  • Medical sciences
  • mHealth
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • mixed methods
  • Mobile phones
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care
  • Patients
  • Perceptions
  • Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry
  • Psychopathology. Psychiatry
  • Qualitative Research
  • Quality Improvement - organization & administration
  • Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
  • Smartphones
  • Social psychiatry. Ethnopsychiatry
  • Telemedicine - methods
  • Telemedicine - standards
  • Uganda
  • Viral diseases
  • Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
  • Young Adult
ispartof: AIDS care, 2013, Vol.25 (7), p.874-880
description: Mobile technologies for health (mHealth) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the development of novel mHealth HIV/AIDS care interventions to be used by community health workers (CHWs) in Kampala, Uganda. A mixed methods formative research approach was utilized. Qualitative methods included 20 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus groups with CHWs, clinic staff, and patients. Thematic analysis was performed and selected quotations used to illustrate themes. Quantitative methods consisted of a survey administered to CHWs and clinic staff, using categorical and Likert scale questions regarding current mobile phone and internet access and perceptions on the potential use of smartphones by CHWs. Qualitative results included themes on significant current care challenges, multiple perceived mHealth benefits, and general intervention acceptability. Key mHealth features desired included tools to verify CHWs' task completions, clinical decision support tools, and simple access to voice calling. Inhibiting factors identified included concerns about CHWs' job security and unrealistic expectations of mHealth capabilities. Quantitative results from 27 staff participants found that 26 (96%) did not have internet access at home, yet only 2 (7.4%) did not own a mobile phone. Likert scale survey responses (1-5, 1 = Strongly Disagree, 5 = Strongly Agree) indicated general agreement that smartphones would improve efficiency (Mean = 4.35) and patient care (4.31) but might be harmful to patient confidentiality (3.88) and training was needed (4.63). Qualitative and quantitative results were generally consistent, and, overall, there was enthusiasm for mHealth technology. However, a number of potential inhibiting factors were also discovered. Findings from this study may help guide future design and implementation of mHealth interventions in this setting, optimizing their chances for success.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0954-0121
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0954-0121
  • 1360-0451
url: Link


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titlePerceptions and acceptability of mHealth interventions for improving patient care at a community-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda: A mixed methods study
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creatorChang, Larry W. ; Njie-Carr, Veronica ; Kalenge, Sheila ; Kelly, Jack F. ; Bollinger, Robert C. ; Alamo-Talisuna, Stella
creatorcontribChang, Larry W. ; Njie-Carr, Veronica ; Kalenge, Sheila ; Kelly, Jack F. ; Bollinger, Robert C. ; Alamo-Talisuna, Stella
descriptionMobile technologies for health (mHealth) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the development of novel mHealth HIV/AIDS care interventions to be used by community health workers (CHWs) in Kampala, Uganda. A mixed methods formative research approach was utilized. Qualitative methods included 20 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus groups with CHWs, clinic staff, and patients. Thematic analysis was performed and selected quotations used to illustrate themes. Quantitative methods consisted of a survey administered to CHWs and clinic staff, using categorical and Likert scale questions regarding current mobile phone and internet access and perceptions on the potential use of smartphones by CHWs. Qualitative results included themes on significant current care challenges, multiple perceived mHealth benefits, and general intervention acceptability. Key mHealth features desired included tools to verify CHWs' task completions, clinical decision support tools, and simple access to voice calling. Inhibiting factors identified included concerns about CHWs' job security and unrealistic expectations of mHealth capabilities. Quantitative results from 27 staff participants found that 26 (96%) did not have internet access at home, yet only 2 (7.4%) did not own a mobile phone. Likert scale survey responses (1-5, 1 = Strongly Disagree, 5 = Strongly Agree) indicated general agreement that smartphones would improve efficiency (Mean = 4.35) and patient care (4.31) but might be harmful to patient confidentiality (3.88) and training was needed (4.63). Qualitative and quantitative results were generally consistent, and, overall, there was enthusiasm for mHealth technology. However, a number of potential inhibiting factors were also discovered. Findings from this study may help guide future design and implementation of mHealth interventions in this setting, optimizing their chances for success.
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subjectAccess ; Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ; Adult ; AIDS ; AIDS/HIV ; Antiretroviral drugs ; antiretroviral treatment ; Article ; Attitude of Health Personnel ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cell Phone ; Clinics ; Communications technology ; Community Health Services - methods ; Community Health Services - standards ; community health workers ; Community services ; Confidentiality ; Female ; Focus Groups ; Health care ; Health Care Services ; HIV ; HIV Infections - therapy ; Human immunodeficiency virus ; Human viral diseases ; Humans ; Immunodeficiencies ; Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies ; Immunopathology ; Infectious diseases ; Internet ; Intervention ; Interventions ; Interviews as Topic ; Job Security ; Male ; Medical Decision Making ; Medical personnel ; Medical sciences ; mHealth ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; mixed methods ; Mobile phones ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care ; Patients ; Perceptions ; Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry ; Psychopathology. Psychiatry ; Qualitative Research ; Quality Improvement - organization & administration ; Quality of Health Care - organization & administration ; Smartphones ; Social psychiatry. Ethnopsychiatry ; Telemedicine - methods ; Telemedicine - standards ; Uganda ; Viral diseases ; Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids ; Young Adult
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descriptionMobile technologies for health (mHealth) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the development of novel mHealth HIV/AIDS care interventions to be used by community health workers (CHWs) in Kampala, Uganda. A mixed methods formative research approach was utilized. Qualitative methods included 20 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus groups with CHWs, clinic staff, and patients. Thematic analysis was performed and selected quotations used to illustrate themes. Quantitative methods consisted of a survey administered to CHWs and clinic staff, using categorical and Likert scale questions regarding current mobile phone and internet access and perceptions on the potential use of smartphones by CHWs. Qualitative results included themes on significant current care challenges, multiple perceived mHealth benefits, and general intervention acceptability. Key mHealth features desired included tools to verify CHWs' task completions, clinical decision support tools, and simple access to voice calling. Inhibiting factors identified included concerns about CHWs' job security and unrealistic expectations of mHealth capabilities. Quantitative results from 27 staff participants found that 26 (96%) did not have internet access at home, yet only 2 (7.4%) did not own a mobile phone. Likert scale survey responses (1-5, 1 = Strongly Disagree, 5 = Strongly Agree) indicated general agreement that smartphones would improve efficiency (Mean = 4.35) and patient care (4.31) but might be harmful to patient confidentiality (3.88) and training was needed (4.63). Qualitative and quantitative results were generally consistent, and, overall, there was enthusiasm for mHealth technology. However, a number of potential inhibiting factors were also discovered. Findings from this study may help guide future design and implementation of mHealth interventions in this setting, optimizing their chances for success.
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22HIV
23HIV Infections - therapy
24Human immunodeficiency virus
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27Immunodeficiencies
28Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies
29Immunopathology
30Infectious diseases
31Internet
32Intervention
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34Interviews as Topic
35Job Security
36Male
37Medical Decision Making
38Medical personnel
39Medical sciences
40mHealth
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42Miscellaneous
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45Patient Acceptance of Health Care
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47Perceptions
48Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry
49Psychopathology. Psychiatry
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54Social psychiatry. Ethnopsychiatry
55Telemedicine - methods
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titlePerceptions and acceptability of mHealth interventions for improving patient care at a community-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda: A mixed methods study
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abstractMobile technologies for health (mHealth) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the development of novel mHealth HIV/AIDS care interventions to be used by community health workers (CHWs) in Kampala, Uganda. A mixed methods formative research approach was utilized. Qualitative methods included 20 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus groups with CHWs, clinic staff, and patients. Thematic analysis was performed and selected quotations used to illustrate themes. Quantitative methods consisted of a survey administered to CHWs and clinic staff, using categorical and Likert scale questions regarding current mobile phone and internet access and perceptions on the potential use of smartphones by CHWs. Qualitative results included themes on significant current care challenges, multiple perceived mHealth benefits, and general intervention acceptability. Key mHealth features desired included tools to verify CHWs' task completions, clinical decision support tools, and simple access to voice calling. Inhibiting factors identified included concerns about CHWs' job security and unrealistic expectations of mHealth capabilities. Quantitative results from 27 staff participants found that 26 (96%) did not have internet access at home, yet only 2 (7.4%) did not own a mobile phone. Likert scale survey responses (1-5, 1 = Strongly Disagree, 5 = Strongly Agree) indicated general agreement that smartphones would improve efficiency (Mean = 4.35) and patient care (4.31) but might be harmful to patient confidentiality (3.88) and training was needed (4.63). Qualitative and quantitative results were generally consistent, and, overall, there was enthusiasm for mHealth technology. However, a number of potential inhibiting factors were also discovered. Findings from this study may help guide future design and implementation of mHealth interventions in this setting, optimizing their chances for success.
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