schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Using accelerometers to measure physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies: issues and challenges

Background The current guidelines for aerobic activity require that adults carry out ≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity physical activity, with a large body of epidemiological evidence showing this level of activity to decrease the incidence of many chronic diseases. Less is known about whether lig... Full description

Journal Title: British journal of sports medicine 2014-02, Vol.48 (3), p.197-201
Main Author: Lee, I-Min
Other Authors: Shiroma, Eric J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: England: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0306-3674
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24297837
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1490754015
title: Using accelerometers to measure physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies: issues and challenges
format: Article
creator:
  • Lee, I-Min
  • Shiroma, Eric J
subjects:
  • Accelerometers
  • Accelerometry - instrumentation
  • Analysis
  • Chronic diseases
  • Chronic illnesses
  • Data Collection
  • Diagnosis
  • Epidemiologic Studies
  • Exercise
  • Exercise - physiology
  • Female
  • Health aspects
  • Health behavior
  • Humans
  • Mortality
  • Physical fitness
  • Practice Guidelines as Topic
  • Risk Factors
  • Sedentary Lifestyle
  • Sensors
  • Studies
  • Technology application
  • Usage
  • Women's Health
  • Womens health
ispartof: British journal of sports medicine, 2014-02, Vol.48 (3), p.197-201
description: Background The current guidelines for aerobic activity require that adults carry out ≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity physical activity, with a large body of epidemiological evidence showing this level of activity to decrease the incidence of many chronic diseases. Less is known about whether light-intensity activities also have such benefits, and whether sedentary behaviour is an independent predictor of increased risks of these chronic diseases, as imprecise assessments of these behaviours and cross-sectional study designs have limited knowledge to date. Methods Recent technological advances in assessment methods have made the use of movement sensors, such as the accelerometer, feasible for use in longitudinal, large-scale epidemiological studies. Several such studies are collecting sensor-assessed, objective measures of physical activity with the aim of relating these to the development of clinical endpoints. This is a relatively new area of research; thus, in this article, we use the Women's Health Study (WHS) as a case study to illustrate the challenges related to data collection, data processing and analyses of the vast amount of data collected. Results The WHS plans to collect 7 days of accelerometer-assessed physical activity and sedentary behaviour in ∼18 000 women aged ≥62 years. Several logistical challenges exist in collecting data; nonetheless, as of 31 August 2013, 11 590 women have already provided some data. In addition, the WHS experience on data reduction and data analyses can help inform other similar large-scale epidemiological studies. Conclusions Important data on the health effects of light-intensity activity and sedentary behaviour will emerge from large-scale epidemiological studies collecting objective assessments of these behaviours.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0306-3674
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0306-3674
  • 1473-0480
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.7470794
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_proqu
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1490754015
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA365616900
sourcerecordidA365616900
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1522t-fc62a91b0690d0877b1bdad02370209f109da4a381d218a592bb3f6038ab44b90
addsrcrecordideNqNkkFv1DAQhS0EotvCP0AoEhcuaWdsx457qyooSJW40HNkJ07qVRIH20Haf18vaTn0AJUPI4--N3ozeoR8QDhHZOLC7OPiQ4olBWQlKIYVf0V2yGX-8Rpekx0wECUTkp-Q0xj3AEgrqN-SE8qpkjWTO-LvopuHQretHW3wk002xCL5YrI6rsEWy_0hulaPGUnut0uHws3FqMNgy5jbtrCL6-zk_OiHP1xMa-dsvCxcjKuNhZ67or3X42jnwcZ35E2vx2jfP9Yzcvf1y8_rb-Xtj5vv11e3JVaUprJvBdUKDQgFHdRSGjSd7oAyCRRUj6A6zTWrsaNY60pRY1gvgNXacG4UnJHP29wl-F_ZRmomF_OOo56tX2ODXIlaVYLhS1CQFQesMvrpGbr3a5jzIg1KqZhgUtB_UlzWQBFRZup8o4Z8xcbNvU9Bt_kdr9n62fYu96-YqATmK0AW8E3QBh9jsH2zBDfpcGgQmmMkmqdINMdINFsksuzjo5vVTLb7K3rKQAYun81tXdLJ-TkbcuP_pl9sYjPtX-bnAceF1fM
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1779363762
display
typearticle
titleUsing accelerometers to measure physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies: issues and challenges
creatorLee, I-Min ; Shiroma, Eric J
creatorcontribLee, I-Min ; Shiroma, Eric J
descriptionBackground The current guidelines for aerobic activity require that adults carry out ≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity physical activity, with a large body of epidemiological evidence showing this level of activity to decrease the incidence of many chronic diseases. Less is known about whether light-intensity activities also have such benefits, and whether sedentary behaviour is an independent predictor of increased risks of these chronic diseases, as imprecise assessments of these behaviours and cross-sectional study designs have limited knowledge to date. Methods Recent technological advances in assessment methods have made the use of movement sensors, such as the accelerometer, feasible for use in longitudinal, large-scale epidemiological studies. Several such studies are collecting sensor-assessed, objective measures of physical activity with the aim of relating these to the development of clinical endpoints. This is a relatively new area of research; thus, in this article, we use the Women's Health Study (WHS) as a case study to illustrate the challenges related to data collection, data processing and analyses of the vast amount of data collected. Results The WHS plans to collect 7 days of accelerometer-assessed physical activity and sedentary behaviour in ∼18 000 women aged ≥62 years. Several logistical challenges exist in collecting data; nonetheless, as of 31 August 2013, 11 590 women have already provided some data. In addition, the WHS experience on data reduction and data analyses can help inform other similar large-scale epidemiological studies. Conclusions Important data on the health effects of light-intensity activity and sedentary behaviour will emerge from large-scale epidemiological studies collecting objective assessments of these behaviours.
identifier
0ISSN: 0306-3674
1EISSN: 1473-0480
2DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093154
3PMID: 24297837
languageeng
publisherEngland: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
subjectAccelerometers ; Accelerometry - instrumentation ; Analysis ; Chronic diseases ; Chronic illnesses ; Data Collection ; Diagnosis ; Epidemiologic Studies ; Exercise ; Exercise - physiology ; Female ; Health aspects ; Health behavior ; Humans ; Mortality ; Physical fitness ; Practice Guidelines as Topic ; Risk Factors ; Sedentary Lifestyle ; Sensors ; Studies ; Technology application ; Usage ; Women's Health ; Womens health
ispartofBritish journal of sports medicine, 2014-02, Vol.48 (3), p.197-201
rights
0Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions
1Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions2014
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1522t-fc62a91b0690d0877b1bdad02370209f109da4a381d218a592bb3f6038ab44b90
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1522t-fc62a91b0690d0877b1bdad02370209f109da4a381d218a592bb3f6038ab44b90
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24297837$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Lee, I-Min
1Shiroma, Eric J
title
0Using accelerometers to measure physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies: issues and challenges
1British journal of sports medicine
addtitleBr J Sports Med
descriptionBackground The current guidelines for aerobic activity require that adults carry out ≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity physical activity, with a large body of epidemiological evidence showing this level of activity to decrease the incidence of many chronic diseases. Less is known about whether light-intensity activities also have such benefits, and whether sedentary behaviour is an independent predictor of increased risks of these chronic diseases, as imprecise assessments of these behaviours and cross-sectional study designs have limited knowledge to date. Methods Recent technological advances in assessment methods have made the use of movement sensors, such as the accelerometer, feasible for use in longitudinal, large-scale epidemiological studies. Several such studies are collecting sensor-assessed, objective measures of physical activity with the aim of relating these to the development of clinical endpoints. This is a relatively new area of research; thus, in this article, we use the Women's Health Study (WHS) as a case study to illustrate the challenges related to data collection, data processing and analyses of the vast amount of data collected. Results The WHS plans to collect 7 days of accelerometer-assessed physical activity and sedentary behaviour in ∼18 000 women aged ≥62 years. Several logistical challenges exist in collecting data; nonetheless, as of 31 August 2013, 11 590 women have already provided some data. In addition, the WHS experience on data reduction and data analyses can help inform other similar large-scale epidemiological studies. Conclusions Important data on the health effects of light-intensity activity and sedentary behaviour will emerge from large-scale epidemiological studies collecting objective assessments of these behaviours.
subject
0Accelerometers
1Accelerometry - instrumentation
2Analysis
3Chronic diseases
4Chronic illnesses
5Data Collection
6Diagnosis
7Epidemiologic Studies
8Exercise
9Exercise - physiology
10Female
11Health aspects
12Health behavior
13Humans
14Mortality
15Physical fitness
16Practice Guidelines as Topic
17Risk Factors
18Sedentary Lifestyle
19Sensors
20Studies
21Technology application
22Usage
23Women's Health
24Womens health
issn
00306-3674
11473-0480
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2014
recordtypearticle
recordideNqNkkFv1DAQhS0EotvCP0AoEhcuaWdsx457qyooSJW40HNkJ07qVRIH20Haf18vaTn0AJUPI4--N3ozeoR8QDhHZOLC7OPiQ4olBWQlKIYVf0V2yGX-8Rpekx0wECUTkp-Q0xj3AEgrqN-SE8qpkjWTO-LvopuHQretHW3wk002xCL5YrI6rsEWy_0hulaPGUnut0uHws3FqMNgy5jbtrCL6-zk_OiHP1xMa-dsvCxcjKuNhZ67or3X42jnwcZ35E2vx2jfP9Yzcvf1y8_rb-Xtj5vv11e3JVaUprJvBdUKDQgFHdRSGjSd7oAyCRRUj6A6zTWrsaNY60pRY1gvgNXacG4UnJHP29wl-F_ZRmomF_OOo56tX2ODXIlaVYLhS1CQFQesMvrpGbr3a5jzIg1KqZhgUtB_UlzWQBFRZup8o4Z8xcbNvU9Bt_kdr9n62fYu96-YqATmK0AW8E3QBh9jsH2zBDfpcGgQmmMkmqdINMdINFsksuzjo5vVTLb7K3rKQAYun81tXdLJ-TkbcuP_pl9sYjPtX-bnAceF1fM
startdate201402
enddate201402
creator
0Lee, I-Min
1Shiroma, Eric J
general
0BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
1BMJ Publishing Group
2BMJ Publishing Group LTD
scope
0CGR
1CUY
2CVF
3ECM
4EIF
5NPM
6AAYXX
7CITATION
8BSHEE
97TS
103V.
117RV
127X7
137XB
1488E
1588I
168AF
178FI
188FJ
198FK
208G5
21ABUWG
22AZQEC
23BENPR
24BTHHO
25DWQXO
26FYUFA
27GHDGH
28GNUQQ
29GUQSH
30HCIFZ
31K9.
32KB0
33M0S
34M1P
35M2O
36M2P
37MBDVC
38NAPCQ
39PADUT
40PQEST
41PQQKQ
42PQUKI
43PRINS
44Q9U
457X8
sort
creationdate201402
titleUsing accelerometers to measure physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies: issues and challenges
authorLee, I-Min ; Shiroma, Eric J
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1522t-fc62a91b0690d0877b1bdad02370209f109da4a381d218a592bb3f6038ab44b90
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2014
topic
0Accelerometers
1Accelerometry - instrumentation
2Analysis
3Chronic diseases
4Chronic illnesses
5Data Collection
6Diagnosis
7Epidemiologic Studies
8Exercise
9Exercise - physiology
10Female
11Health aspects
12Health behavior
13Humans
14Mortality
15Physical fitness
16Practice Guidelines as Topic
17Risk Factors
18Sedentary Lifestyle
19Sensors
20Studies
21Technology application
22Usage
23Women's Health
24Womens health
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Lee, I-Min
1Shiroma, Eric J
collection
0Medline
1MEDLINE
2MEDLINE (Ovid)
3MEDLINE
4MEDLINE
5PubMed
6CrossRef
7Academic OneFile (A&I only)
8Physical Education Index
9ProQuest Central (Corporate)
10Nursing & Allied Health Database
11Health & Medical Collection
12ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
13Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
14Science Database (Alumni Edition)
15STEM Database
16Hospital Premium Collection
17Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
18ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
19Research Library (Alumni Edition)
20ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
21ProQuest Central Essentials
22ProQuest Central
23BMJ Journals
24ProQuest Central Korea
25Health Research Premium Collection
26Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
27ProQuest Central Student
28Research Library Prep
29SciTech Premium Collection
30ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
31Nursing & Allied Health Database (Alumni Edition)
32Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
33Medical Database
34Research Library
35Science Database
36Research Library (Corporate)
37Nursing & Allied Health Premium
38Research Library China
39ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
40ProQuest One Academic
41ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
42ProQuest Central China
43ProQuest Central Basic
44MEDLINE - Academic
jtitleBritish journal of sports medicine
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Lee, I-Min
1Shiroma, Eric J
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleUsing accelerometers to measure physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies: issues and challenges
jtitleBritish journal of sports medicine
addtitleBr J Sports Med
date2014-02
risdate2014
volume48
issue3
spage197
epage201
pages197-201
issn0306-3674
eissn1473-0480
abstractBackground The current guidelines for aerobic activity require that adults carry out ≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity physical activity, with a large body of epidemiological evidence showing this level of activity to decrease the incidence of many chronic diseases. Less is known about whether light-intensity activities also have such benefits, and whether sedentary behaviour is an independent predictor of increased risks of these chronic diseases, as imprecise assessments of these behaviours and cross-sectional study designs have limited knowledge to date. Methods Recent technological advances in assessment methods have made the use of movement sensors, such as the accelerometer, feasible for use in longitudinal, large-scale epidemiological studies. Several such studies are collecting sensor-assessed, objective measures of physical activity with the aim of relating these to the development of clinical endpoints. This is a relatively new area of research; thus, in this article, we use the Women's Health Study (WHS) as a case study to illustrate the challenges related to data collection, data processing and analyses of the vast amount of data collected. Results The WHS plans to collect 7 days of accelerometer-assessed physical activity and sedentary behaviour in ∼18 000 women aged ≥62 years. Several logistical challenges exist in collecting data; nonetheless, as of 31 August 2013, 11 590 women have already provided some data. In addition, the WHS experience on data reduction and data analyses can help inform other similar large-scale epidemiological studies. Conclusions Important data on the health effects of light-intensity activity and sedentary behaviour will emerge from large-scale epidemiological studies collecting objective assessments of these behaviours.
copEngland
pubBMJ Publishing Group Ltd
pmid24297837
doi10.1136/bjsports-2013-093154
oafree_for_read