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PREDATOR PERCEPTION OF BATESIAN MIMICRY AND CONSPICUOUSNESS IN A SALAMANDER

In Batesian mimicry a palatable mimic deceives predators by resembling an unpalatable model. The evolution of Batesian mimicry relies on the visual capabilities of the potential predators, as prey detection provides the selective force driving evolutionary change. We compared the visual capabilities... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2014, Vol.68 (4), p.1197-1206
Main Author: Kraemer, Andrew C.
Other Authors: Adams, Dean C.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24274647
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1512558760
title: PREDATOR PERCEPTION OF BATESIAN MIMICRY AND CONSPICUOUSNESS IN A SALAMANDER
format: Article
creator:
  • Kraemer, Andrew C.
  • Adams, Dean C.
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Aposematism
  • Biological Evolution
  • Birds
  • Birds of prey
  • BRIEF COMMUNICATION
  • Color
  • Color Perception
  • Colors
  • Colubridae - physiology
  • Ecosystem
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic polymorphisms
  • Mammals
  • Massachusetts
  • Mimicry
  • Natural history
  • Notophthalmus
  • Passeriformes - physiology
  • Pigments, Biological
  • Plant litter
  • Plethodon
  • Polymorphism
  • Predation
  • Predation (Biology)
  • Predators
  • Predatory Behavior
  • Reptiles & amphibians
  • Salamanders
  • Sciuridae - physiology
  • Snakes
  • Urodela - anatomy & histology
  • visual model
ispartof: Evolution, 2014, Vol.68 (4), p.1197-1206
description: In Batesian mimicry a palatable mimic deceives predators by resembling an unpalatable model. The evolution of Batesian mimicry relies on the visual capabilities of the potential predators, as prey detection provides the selective force driving evolutionary change. We compared the visual capabilities of several potential predators to test predictions stemming from the hypothesis of Batesian mimicry between two salamanders: the model species Notophthalmus viridescens, and polymorphic mimic, Plethodon cinereus. First, we found mimicry to be restricted to coloration, but not brightness. Second, only bird predators appeared able to discriminate between the colors of models and nonmimic P. cinereus. Third, estimates of salamander conspicuousness were background dependent, corresponding to predictions only for backgrounds against which salamanders are most active. These results support the hypothesis that birds influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry in P. cinereus, as they are the only group examined capable of differentiating N. viridescens and nonmimetic P. cinereus. Additionally, patterns of conspicuousness suggest that selection from predators may drive the evolution of conspicuousness in this system. This study confirms the expectation that the visual abilities of predators may influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry, but the role of conspicuousness may be more complex than previously thought.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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descriptionIn Batesian mimicry a palatable mimic deceives predators by resembling an unpalatable model. The evolution of Batesian mimicry relies on the visual capabilities of the potential predators, as prey detection provides the selective force driving evolutionary change. We compared the visual capabilities of several potential predators to test predictions stemming from the hypothesis of Batesian mimicry between two salamanders: the model species Notophthalmus viridescens, and polymorphic mimic, Plethodon cinereus. First, we found mimicry to be restricted to coloration, but not brightness. Second, only bird predators appeared able to discriminate between the colors of models and nonmimic P. cinereus. Third, estimates of salamander conspicuousness were background dependent, corresponding to predictions only for backgrounds against which salamanders are most active. These results support the hypothesis that birds influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry in P. cinereus, as they are the only group examined capable of differentiating N. viridescens and nonmimetic P. cinereus. Additionally, patterns of conspicuousness suggest that selection from predators may drive the evolution of conspicuousness in this system. This study confirms the expectation that the visual abilities of predators may influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry, but the role of conspicuousness may be more complex than previously thought.
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subjectAnimals ; Aposematism ; Biological Evolution ; Birds ; Birds of prey ; BRIEF COMMUNICATION ; Color ; Color Perception ; Colors ; Colubridae - physiology ; Ecosystem ; Evolution ; Evolutionary biology ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic polymorphisms ; Mammals ; Massachusetts ; Mimicry ; Natural history ; Notophthalmus ; Passeriformes - physiology ; Pigments, Biological ; Plant litter ; Plethodon ; Polymorphism ; Predation ; Predation (Biology) ; Predators ; Predatory Behavior ; Reptiles & amphibians ; Salamanders ; Sciuridae - physiology ; Snakes ; Urodela - anatomy & histology ; visual model
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descriptionIn Batesian mimicry a palatable mimic deceives predators by resembling an unpalatable model. The evolution of Batesian mimicry relies on the visual capabilities of the potential predators, as prey detection provides the selective force driving evolutionary change. We compared the visual capabilities of several potential predators to test predictions stemming from the hypothesis of Batesian mimicry between two salamanders: the model species Notophthalmus viridescens, and polymorphic mimic, Plethodon cinereus. First, we found mimicry to be restricted to coloration, but not brightness. Second, only bird predators appeared able to discriminate between the colors of models and nonmimic P. cinereus. Third, estimates of salamander conspicuousness were background dependent, corresponding to predictions only for backgrounds against which salamanders are most active. These results support the hypothesis that birds influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry in P. cinereus, as they are the only group examined capable of differentiating N. viridescens and nonmimetic P. cinereus. Additionally, patterns of conspicuousness suggest that selection from predators may drive the evolution of conspicuousness in this system. This study confirms the expectation that the visual abilities of predators may influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry, but the role of conspicuousness may be more complex than previously thought.
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abstractIn Batesian mimicry a palatable mimic deceives predators by resembling an unpalatable model. The evolution of Batesian mimicry relies on the visual capabilities of the potential predators, as prey detection provides the selective force driving evolutionary change. We compared the visual capabilities of several potential predators to test predictions stemming from the hypothesis of Batesian mimicry between two salamanders: the model species Notophthalmus viridescens, and polymorphic mimic, Plethodon cinereus. First, we found mimicry to be restricted to coloration, but not brightness. Second, only bird predators appeared able to discriminate between the colors of models and nonmimic P. cinereus. Third, estimates of salamander conspicuousness were background dependent, corresponding to predictions only for backgrounds against which salamanders are most active. These results support the hypothesis that birds influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry in P. cinereus, as they are the only group examined capable of differentiating N. viridescens and nonmimetic P. cinereus. Additionally, patterns of conspicuousness suggest that selection from predators may drive the evolution of conspicuousness in this system. This study confirms the expectation that the visual abilities of predators may influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry, but the role of conspicuousness may be more complex than previously thought.
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