schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Do closely related plants host similar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities? A meta-analysis

Aims The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread symbiosis in terrestrial biomes with functional implications for the ecology of both plants and soil organisms. We here asked whether phylogenetic host specificity (PHS) in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities exists. Methods Data w... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2014-04-01, Vol.377 (1/2), p.395-406
Main Author: Veresoglou, Stavros D
Other Authors: Rillig, Matthias C
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Cham: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=28607306
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1516758584
title: Do closely related plants host similar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities? A meta-analysis
format: Article
creator:
  • Veresoglou, Stavros D
  • Rillig, Matthias C
subjects:
  • Agroecosystems
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Botanical research
  • Community ecology
  • Ecology
  • Economic plant physiology
  • Environmental aspects
  • Forest ecosystems
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Fungi
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Life Sciences
  • Meta-analysis
  • Microbiological research
  • Mycology
  • Mycorrhizal fungi
  • Mycorrhizas
  • Phylogenetics
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant populations
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plant taxonomy
  • Plant-pathogen relationships
  • Plants
  • Regular Article
  • Soil microorganisms
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
  • Symbiosis
  • Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...)
  • Terrestrial ecosystems
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2014-04-01, Vol.377 (1/2), p.395-406
description: Aims The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread symbiosis in terrestrial biomes with functional implications for the ecology of both plants and soil organisms. We here asked whether phylogenetic host specificity (PHS) in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities exists. Methods Data were retrieved from the online database MaarjAM and AM fungal sequences were clustered into taxa to allow us to compute community similarity indices. The phylogenetic reconstruction of the plant hosts allowed us to obtain an objective index of host relatedness. PHS was assessed through mixed effects linear models with community similarity as dependent variable, host relatedness as independent variable and with ecosystem type as covariate. Results To our surprise not only did we not find evidence of PHS, but we detected evidence that more closely related plants hosted more dissimilar AM fungal communities. Results differed for different ecosystems. Conclusions We highlight the importance of ecosystem type when assessing PHS. Moreover, we argue for potential causes of the unique PHS patterns that are detected in the AM association.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.5705845
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_proqu
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1516758584
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA372250502
jstor_id44244631
sourcerecordidA372250502
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-c430t-d0ee5ec3b480912f60542e602f270b618749cd1c14434510c2309285370d9a800
addsrcrecordideNp9kU9r3DAQxU1poNukH6CHgqEUenEy-m-fypK0aSGQSwu9Ca0sJ1pka6uRD9tPX7kOIeQQdBhJvN_MG15VvSdwTgDUBRJCgDdAWEMB2oa-qjZEKNYIYPJ1tQFgtAHV_X5TvUXcw_ImclOZq1jbENGFY51cMNn19SGYKWN9HzHX6EcfTKpN2s1o5-U6Hm1M6d7_NaEe5umuFBvHcZ589g6_1Nt6dNk0ZjLhiB7PqpPBBHTvHupp9evb15-X35ub2-sfl9ubxnIGuenBOeEs2_EWOkIHCYJTJ4EOVMFOklbxzvbEEs4ZFwQsZdDRVjAFfWdagNPq89r3kOKf2WHWo0frQlnGxRk1EUQq0YqWF-nHZ9J9nFPx-18FTBEhVVGdr6qyodN-GmJOxpbTu9HbOLnBl_8tU5QKEEALQFbApoiY3KAPyY8mHTUBvaSk15R0SUkvKemF-fRgxaA1YUhmsh4fQdpKUAxk0alnva3PJvs4FVM-vDiBriSWptOdS0-WfQH6sEJ7zDE92uGcci4ZgX_6f7rl
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1510371567
display
typearticle
titleDo closely related plants host similar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities? A meta-analysis
creatorVeresoglou, Stavros D ; Rillig, Matthias C
creatorcontribVeresoglou, Stavros D ; Rillig, Matthias C
descriptionAims The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread symbiosis in terrestrial biomes with functional implications for the ecology of both plants and soil organisms. We here asked whether phylogenetic host specificity (PHS) in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities exists. Methods Data were retrieved from the online database MaarjAM and AM fungal sequences were clustered into taxa to allow us to compute community similarity indices. The phylogenetic reconstruction of the plant hosts allowed us to obtain an objective index of host relatedness. PHS was assessed through mixed effects linear models with community similarity as dependent variable, host relatedness as independent variable and with ecosystem type as covariate. Results To our surprise not only did we not find evidence of PHS, but we detected evidence that more closely related plants hosted more dissimilar AM fungal communities. Results differed for different ecosystems. Conclusions We highlight the importance of ecosystem type when assessing PHS. Moreover, we argue for potential causes of the unique PHS patterns that are detected in the AM association.
identifier
0ISSN: 0032-079X
1EISSN: 1573-5036
2DOI: 10.1007/s11104-013-2008-2
3CODEN: PLSOA2
languageeng
publisherCham: Springer
subjectAgroecosystems ; Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Botanical research ; Community ecology ; Ecology ; Economic plant physiology ; Environmental aspects ; Forest ecosystems ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Fungi ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Life Sciences ; Meta-analysis ; Microbiological research ; Mycology ; Mycorrhizal fungi ; Mycorrhizas ; Phylogenetics ; Plant Physiology ; Plant populations ; Plant Sciences ; Plant taxonomy ; Plant-pathogen relationships ; Plants ; Regular Article ; Soil microorganisms ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments ; Symbiosis ; Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...) ; Terrestrial ecosystems
ispartofPlant and soil, 2014-04-01, Vol.377 (1/2), p.395-406
rights
0Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014
12015 INIST-CNRS
2COPYRIGHT 2014 Springer
3Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014
lds50peer_reviewed
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-c430t-d0ee5ec3b480912f60542e602f270b618749cd1c14434510c2309285370d9a800
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-c430t-d0ee5ec3b480912f60542e602f270b618749cd1c14434510c2309285370d9a800
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=28607306$$DView record in Pascal Francis
search
creatorcontrib
0Veresoglou, Stavros D
1Rillig, Matthias C
title
0Do closely related plants host similar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities? A meta-analysis
1Plant and soil
addtitlePlant Soil
descriptionAims The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread symbiosis in terrestrial biomes with functional implications for the ecology of both plants and soil organisms. We here asked whether phylogenetic host specificity (PHS) in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities exists. Methods Data were retrieved from the online database MaarjAM and AM fungal sequences were clustered into taxa to allow us to compute community similarity indices. The phylogenetic reconstruction of the plant hosts allowed us to obtain an objective index of host relatedness. PHS was assessed through mixed effects linear models with community similarity as dependent variable, host relatedness as independent variable and with ecosystem type as covariate. Results To our surprise not only did we not find evidence of PHS, but we detected evidence that more closely related plants hosted more dissimilar AM fungal communities. Results differed for different ecosystems. Conclusions We highlight the importance of ecosystem type when assessing PHS. Moreover, we argue for potential causes of the unique PHS patterns that are detected in the AM association.
subject
0Agroecosystems
1Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
2Animal, plant and microbial ecology
3Biological and medical sciences
4Biomedical and Life Sciences
5Botanical research
6Community ecology
7Ecology
8Economic plant physiology
9Environmental aspects
10Forest ecosystems
11Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
12Fungi
13General agronomy. Plant production
14Life Sciences
15Meta-analysis
16Microbiological research
17Mycology
18Mycorrhizal fungi
19Mycorrhizas
20Phylogenetics
21Plant Physiology
22Plant populations
23Plant Sciences
24Plant taxonomy
25Plant-pathogen relationships
26Plants
27Regular Article
28Soil microorganisms
29Soil Science & Conservation
30Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
31Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
32Symbiosis
33Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...)
34Terrestrial ecosystems
issn
00032-079X
11573-5036
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2014
recordtypearticle
recordideNp9kU9r3DAQxU1poNukH6CHgqEUenEy-m-fypK0aSGQSwu9Ca0sJ1pka6uRD9tPX7kOIeQQdBhJvN_MG15VvSdwTgDUBRJCgDdAWEMB2oa-qjZEKNYIYPJ1tQFgtAHV_X5TvUXcw_ImclOZq1jbENGFY51cMNn19SGYKWN9HzHX6EcfTKpN2s1o5-U6Hm1M6d7_NaEe5umuFBvHcZ589g6_1Nt6dNk0ZjLhiB7PqpPBBHTvHupp9evb15-X35ub2-sfl9ubxnIGuenBOeEs2_EWOkIHCYJTJ4EOVMFOklbxzvbEEs4ZFwQsZdDRVjAFfWdagNPq89r3kOKf2WHWo0frQlnGxRk1EUQq0YqWF-nHZ9J9nFPx-18FTBEhVVGdr6qyodN-GmJOxpbTu9HbOLnBl_8tU5QKEEALQFbApoiY3KAPyY8mHTUBvaSk15R0SUkvKemF-fRgxaA1YUhmsh4fQdpKUAxk0alnva3PJvs4FVM-vDiBriSWptOdS0-WfQH6sEJ7zDE92uGcci4ZgX_6f7rl
startdate20140401
enddate20140401
creator
0Veresoglou, Stavros D
1Rillig, Matthias C
general
0Springer
1Springer International Publishing
2Springer Nature B.V
scope
0IQODW
1AAYXX
2CITATION
33V.
47SN
57ST
67T7
77X2
888A
98FD
108FE
118FH
128FK
13ABUWG
14ATCPS
15AZQEC
16BBNVY
17BENPR
18BHPHI
19C1K
20DWQXO
21FR3
22GNUQQ
23HCIFZ
24LK8
25M0K
26M7P
27P64
28PQEST
29PQQKQ
30PQUKI
31PRINS
32RC3
33SOI
34M7N
sort
creationdate20140401
titleDo closely related plants host similar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities? A meta-analysis
authorVeresoglou, Stavros D ; Rillig, Matthias C
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-c430t-d0ee5ec3b480912f60542e602f270b618749cd1c14434510c2309285370d9a800
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2014
topic
0Agroecosystems
1Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
2Animal, plant and microbial ecology
3Biological and medical sciences
4Biomedical and Life Sciences
5Botanical research
6Community ecology
7Ecology
8Economic plant physiology
9Environmental aspects
10Forest ecosystems
11Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
12Fungi
13General agronomy. Plant production
14Life Sciences
15Meta-analysis
16Microbiological research
17Mycology
18Mycorrhizal fungi
19Mycorrhizas
20Phylogenetics
21Plant Physiology
22Plant populations
23Plant Sciences
24Plant taxonomy
25Plant-pathogen relationships
26Plants
27Regular Article
28Soil microorganisms
29Soil Science & Conservation
30Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
31Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
32Symbiosis
33Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...)
34Terrestrial ecosystems
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Veresoglou, Stavros D
1Rillig, Matthias C
collection
0Pascal-Francis
1CrossRef
2ProQuest Central (Corporate)
3Ecology Abstracts
4Environment Abstracts
5Industrial and Applied Microbiology Abstracts (Microbiology A)
6Agricultural Science Collection
7Biology Database (Alumni Edition)
8Technology Research Database
9ProQuest SciTech Collection
10ProQuest Natural Science Collection
11ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
12ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
13Agricultural & Environmental Science Collection
14ProQuest Central Essentials
15Biological Science Collection
16ProQuest Central
17Natural Science Collection
18Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management
19ProQuest Central Korea
20Engineering Research Database
21ProQuest Central Student
22SciTech Premium Collection
23ProQuest Biological Science Collection
24Agricultural Science Database
25Biological Science Database
26Biotechnology and BioEngineering Abstracts
27ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
28ProQuest One Academic
29ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
30ProQuest Central China
31Genetics Abstracts
32Environment Abstracts
33Algology Mycology and Protozoology Abstracts (Microbiology C)
jtitlePlant and soil
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Veresoglou, Stavros D
1Rillig, Matthias C
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleDo closely related plants host similar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities? A meta-analysis
jtitlePlant and soil
stitlePlant Soil
date2014-04-01
risdate2014
volume377
issue1/2
spage395
epage406
pages395-406
issn0032-079X
eissn1573-5036
codenPLSOA2
abstractAims The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread symbiosis in terrestrial biomes with functional implications for the ecology of both plants and soil organisms. We here asked whether phylogenetic host specificity (PHS) in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities exists. Methods Data were retrieved from the online database MaarjAM and AM fungal sequences were clustered into taxa to allow us to compute community similarity indices. The phylogenetic reconstruction of the plant hosts allowed us to obtain an objective index of host relatedness. PHS was assessed through mixed effects linear models with community similarity as dependent variable, host relatedness as independent variable and with ecosystem type as covariate. Results To our surprise not only did we not find evidence of PHS, but we detected evidence that more closely related plants hosted more dissimilar AM fungal communities. Results differed for different ecosystems. Conclusions We highlight the importance of ecosystem type when assessing PHS. Moreover, we argue for potential causes of the unique PHS patterns that are detected in the AM association.
copCham
pubSpringer
doi10.1007/s11104-013-2008-2