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Parental Limited English Proficiency and Health Outcomes for Children With Special Health Care Needs: A Systematic Review

Abstract Background One in 10 US adults of childbearing age has limited English proficiency (LEP). Parental LEP is associated with worse health outcomes among healthy children. The relationship of parental LEP to health outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) has not been system... Full description

Journal Title: Academic pediatrics 2014, Vol.14 (2), p.128-136
Main Author: Eneriz-Wiemer, Monica, MD
Other Authors: Sanders, Lee M., MD, MPH , Barr, Donald A., MD, PhD , Mendoza, Fernando S., MD, MPH
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 1876-2859
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24602575
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1517879341
title: Parental Limited English Proficiency and Health Outcomes for Children With Special Health Care Needs: A Systematic Review
format: Article
creator:
  • Eneriz-Wiemer, Monica, MD
  • Sanders, Lee M., MD, MPH
  • Barr, Donald A., MD, PhD
  • Mendoza, Fernando S., MD, MPH
subjects:
  • access
  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Child Health Services - statistics & numerical data
  • Children
  • children with special health care needs
  • Communication Barriers
  • disabled children
  • Disabled Children - statistics & numerical data
  • English as a second language
  • Health aspects
  • Health Care Costs
  • health care disparities
  • Health Communication
  • Health planning
  • health services accessibility
  • Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
  • Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
  • Health Services Research
  • Health Status
  • Humans
  • Language
  • limited English proficiency
  • Medical colleges
  • Medically Uninsured - statistics & numerical data
  • minority health
  • Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine
  • Parent and child
  • Parenting
  • Parents
  • Pediatrics
  • Quality of Health Care
  • United States
ispartof: Academic pediatrics, 2014, Vol.14 (2), p.128-136
description: Abstract Background One in 10 US adults of childbearing age has limited English proficiency (LEP). Parental LEP is associated with worse health outcomes among healthy children. The relationship of parental LEP to health outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) has not been systematically reviewed. Objective To conduct a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature examining relationships between parental LEP and health outcomes for CSHCN. Data Sources PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Social Science Abstracts, bibliographies of included studies. Key search term categories: language, child, special health care needs, and health outcomes. Eligibility Criteria US studies published between 1964 and 2012 were included if: 1) subjects were CSHCN; 2) studies included some measure of parental LEP; 3) at least 1 outcome measure of child health status, access, utilization, costs, or quality; and 4) primary or secondary data analysis. Methods Three trained reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data. Two separate reviewers appraised studies for methodological rigor and quality. Results From 2765 titles and abstracts, 31 studies met eligibility criteria. Five studies assessed child health status, 12 assessed access, 8 assessed utilization, 2 assessed costs, and 14 assessed quality. Nearly all (29 of 31) studies used only parent- or child-reported outcome measures, rather than objective measures. LEP parents were substantially more likely than English-proficient parents to report that their CSHCN were uninsured and had no usual source of care or medical home. LEP parents were also less likely to report family-centered care and satisfaction with care. Disparities persisted for children with LEP parents after adjustment for ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Conclusions and Implications Parental LEP is independently associated with worse health care access and quality for CSHCN. Health care providers should recognize LEP as an independent risk factor for poor health outcomes among CSHCN. Emerging models of chronic disease care should integrate and evaluate interventions that target access and quality disparities for LEP families.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1876-2859
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1876-2859
  • 1876-2867
url: Link


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descriptionAbstract Background One in 10 US adults of childbearing age has limited English proficiency (LEP). Parental LEP is associated with worse health outcomes among healthy children. The relationship of parental LEP to health outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) has not been systematically reviewed. Objective To conduct a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature examining relationships between parental LEP and health outcomes for CSHCN. Data Sources PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Social Science Abstracts, bibliographies of included studies. Key search term categories: language, child, special health care needs, and health outcomes. Eligibility Criteria US studies published between 1964 and 2012 were included if: 1) subjects were CSHCN; 2) studies included some measure of parental LEP; 3) at least 1 outcome measure of child health status, access, utilization, costs, or quality; and 4) primary or secondary data analysis. Methods Three trained reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data. Two separate reviewers appraised studies for methodological rigor and quality. Results From 2765 titles and abstracts, 31 studies met eligibility criteria. Five studies assessed child health status, 12 assessed access, 8 assessed utilization, 2 assessed costs, and 14 assessed quality. Nearly all (29 of 31) studies used only parent- or child-reported outcome measures, rather than objective measures. LEP parents were substantially more likely than English-proficient parents to report that their CSHCN were uninsured and had no usual source of care or medical home. LEP parents were also less likely to report family-centered care and satisfaction with care. Disparities persisted for children with LEP parents after adjustment for ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Conclusions and Implications Parental LEP is independently associated with worse health care access and quality for CSHCN. Health care providers should recognize LEP as an independent risk factor for poor health outcomes among CSHCN. Emerging models of chronic disease care should integrate and evaluate interventions that target access and quality disparities for LEP families.
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subjectaccess ; Adolescent ; Child ; Child Health Services - statistics & numerical data ; Children ; children with special health care needs ; Communication Barriers ; disabled children ; Disabled Children - statistics & numerical data ; English as a second language ; Health aspects ; Health Care Costs ; health care disparities ; Health Communication ; Health planning ; health services accessibility ; Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data ; Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data ; Health Services Research ; Health Status ; Humans ; Language ; limited English proficiency ; Medical colleges ; Medically Uninsured - statistics & numerical data ; minority health ; Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine ; Parent and child ; Parenting ; Parents ; Pediatrics ; Quality of Health Care ; United States
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descriptionAbstract Background One in 10 US adults of childbearing age has limited English proficiency (LEP). Parental LEP is associated with worse health outcomes among healthy children. The relationship of parental LEP to health outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) has not been systematically reviewed. Objective To conduct a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature examining relationships between parental LEP and health outcomes for CSHCN. Data Sources PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Social Science Abstracts, bibliographies of included studies. Key search term categories: language, child, special health care needs, and health outcomes. Eligibility Criteria US studies published between 1964 and 2012 were included if: 1) subjects were CSHCN; 2) studies included some measure of parental LEP; 3) at least 1 outcome measure of child health status, access, utilization, costs, or quality; and 4) primary or secondary data analysis. Methods Three trained reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data. Two separate reviewers appraised studies for methodological rigor and quality. Results From 2765 titles and abstracts, 31 studies met eligibility criteria. Five studies assessed child health status, 12 assessed access, 8 assessed utilization, 2 assessed costs, and 14 assessed quality. Nearly all (29 of 31) studies used only parent- or child-reported outcome measures, rather than objective measures. LEP parents were substantially more likely than English-proficient parents to report that their CSHCN were uninsured and had no usual source of care or medical home. LEP parents were also less likely to report family-centered care and satisfaction with care. Disparities persisted for children with LEP parents after adjustment for ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Conclusions and Implications Parental LEP is independently associated with worse health care access and quality for CSHCN. Health care providers should recognize LEP as an independent risk factor for poor health outcomes among CSHCN. Emerging models of chronic disease care should integrate and evaluate interventions that target access and quality disparities for LEP families.
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abstractAbstract Background One in 10 US adults of childbearing age has limited English proficiency (LEP). Parental LEP is associated with worse health outcomes among healthy children. The relationship of parental LEP to health outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) has not been systematically reviewed. Objective To conduct a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature examining relationships between parental LEP and health outcomes for CSHCN. Data Sources PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Social Science Abstracts, bibliographies of included studies. Key search term categories: language, child, special health care needs, and health outcomes. Eligibility Criteria US studies published between 1964 and 2012 were included if: 1) subjects were CSHCN; 2) studies included some measure of parental LEP; 3) at least 1 outcome measure of child health status, access, utilization, costs, or quality; and 4) primary or secondary data analysis. Methods Three trained reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data. Two separate reviewers appraised studies for methodological rigor and quality. Results From 2765 titles and abstracts, 31 studies met eligibility criteria. Five studies assessed child health status, 12 assessed access, 8 assessed utilization, 2 assessed costs, and 14 assessed quality. Nearly all (29 of 31) studies used only parent- or child-reported outcome measures, rather than objective measures. LEP parents were substantially more likely than English-proficient parents to report that their CSHCN were uninsured and had no usual source of care or medical home. LEP parents were also less likely to report family-centered care and satisfaction with care. Disparities persisted for children with LEP parents after adjustment for ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Conclusions and Implications Parental LEP is independently associated with worse health care access and quality for CSHCN. Health care providers should recognize LEP as an independent risk factor for poor health outcomes among CSHCN. Emerging models of chronic disease care should integrate and evaluate interventions that target access and quality disparities for LEP families.
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doi10.1016/j.acap.2013.10.003