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Dietary factors affecting polyphenol bioavailability

While many epidemiological studies have associated the consumption of polyphenols within fruits and vegetables with a decreased risk of developing several chronic diseases, intervention studies have generally not confirmed these beneficial effects. The reasons for this discrepancy are not fully unde... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition reviews 2014-07, Vol.72 (7), p.429-452
Main Author: Bohn, Torsten
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
ID: ISSN: 0029-6643
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title: Dietary factors affecting polyphenol bioavailability
format: Article
creator:
  • Bohn, Torsten
subjects:
  • absorption
  • Animals
  • Antioxidants - pharmacokinetics
  • Antioxidants - pharmacology
  • bioaccessibility
  • Bioavailability
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biological Availability
  • Consumption
  • Diet
  • Epidemiology
  • Feeding. Feeding behavior
  • food preparation
  • Fruit - chemistry
  • Fruits
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Humans
  • Isoflavones
  • matrix interactions
  • Physiological aspects
  • phytochemicals
  • Polyphenols
  • Polyphenols - pharmacokinetics
  • Vegetables - chemistry
  • Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems
ispartof: Nutrition reviews, 2014-07, Vol.72 (7), p.429-452
description: While many epidemiological studies have associated the consumption of polyphenols within fruits and vegetables with a decreased risk of developing several chronic diseases, intervention studies have generally not confirmed these beneficial effects. The reasons for this discrepancy are not fully understood but include potential differences in dosing, interaction with the food matrix, and differences in polyphenol bioavailability. In addition to endogenous factors such as microbiota and digestive enzymes, the food matrix can also considerably affect bioaccessibility, uptake, and further metabolism of polyphenols. While dietary fiber (such as hemicellulose), divalent minerals, and viscous and protein‐rich meals are likely to cause detrimental effects on polyphenol bioaccessibility, digestible carbohydrates, dietary lipids (especially for hydrophobic polyphenols, e.g., curcumin), and additional antioxidants may enhance polyphenol availability. Following epithelial uptake, polyphenols such as flavonoids may reduce phase II metabolism and excretion, enhancing polyphenol bioavailability. Furthermore, polyphenols may act synergistically due to their influence on efflux transporters such as p‐glycoprotein. In order to understand polyphenol bioactivity, increased knowledge of the factors affecting polyphenol bioavailability, including dietary factors, is paramount.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-6643
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-6643
  • 1753-4887
url: Link


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descriptionWhile many epidemiological studies have associated the consumption of polyphenols within fruits and vegetables with a decreased risk of developing several chronic diseases, intervention studies have generally not confirmed these beneficial effects. The reasons for this discrepancy are not fully understood but include potential differences in dosing, interaction with the food matrix, and differences in polyphenol bioavailability. In addition to endogenous factors such as microbiota and digestive enzymes, the food matrix can also considerably affect bioaccessibility, uptake, and further metabolism of polyphenols. While dietary fiber (such as hemicellulose), divalent minerals, and viscous and protein‐rich meals are likely to cause detrimental effects on polyphenol bioaccessibility, digestible carbohydrates, dietary lipids (especially for hydrophobic polyphenols, e.g., curcumin), and additional antioxidants may enhance polyphenol availability. Following epithelial uptake, polyphenols such as flavonoids may reduce phase II metabolism and excretion, enhancing polyphenol bioavailability. Furthermore, polyphenols may act synergistically due to their influence on efflux transporters such as p‐glycoprotein. In order to understand polyphenol bioactivity, increased knowledge of the factors affecting polyphenol bioavailability, including dietary factors, is paramount.
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subjectabsorption ; Animals ; Antioxidants - pharmacokinetics ; Antioxidants - pharmacology ; bioaccessibility ; Bioavailability ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biological Availability ; Consumption ; Diet ; Epidemiology ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; food preparation ; Fruit - chemistry ; Fruits ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Humans ; Isoflavones ; matrix interactions ; Physiological aspects ; phytochemicals ; Polyphenols ; Polyphenols - pharmacokinetics ; Vegetables - chemistry ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems
ispartofNutrition reviews, 2014-07, Vol.72 (7), p.429-452
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abstractWhile many epidemiological studies have associated the consumption of polyphenols within fruits and vegetables with a decreased risk of developing several chronic diseases, intervention studies have generally not confirmed these beneficial effects. The reasons for this discrepancy are not fully understood but include potential differences in dosing, interaction with the food matrix, and differences in polyphenol bioavailability. In addition to endogenous factors such as microbiota and digestive enzymes, the food matrix can also considerably affect bioaccessibility, uptake, and further metabolism of polyphenols. While dietary fiber (such as hemicellulose), divalent minerals, and viscous and protein‐rich meals are likely to cause detrimental effects on polyphenol bioaccessibility, digestible carbohydrates, dietary lipids (especially for hydrophobic polyphenols, e.g., curcumin), and additional antioxidants may enhance polyphenol availability. Following epithelial uptake, polyphenols such as flavonoids may reduce phase II metabolism and excretion, enhancing polyphenol bioavailability. Furthermore, polyphenols may act synergistically due to their influence on efflux transporters such as p‐glycoprotein. In order to understand polyphenol bioactivity, increased knowledge of the factors affecting polyphenol bioavailability, including dietary factors, is paramount.
copHoboken, NJ
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pmid24828476
doi10.1111/nure.12114
tpages24