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Mycorrhizal fungi influence plant and soil functions and interactions

Potted soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) plants were grown in P-fertilized (+P) or low-P soil (-P), or colonized in -P soil by one of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus etunicatum (Ge), Glomus mosseae (Gm), or Gigaspora rosea (Gr). Treatment effects on plant development, on the soil microfl... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 1997, Vol.188 (2), p.199-209
Main Author: Schreiner, R.P. (Horticultural Crops Research Lab. USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR (USA))
Other Authors: Mihara, K.L , McDaniel, H , Bethlenfalvay, G.J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_16112361
title: Mycorrhizal fungi influence plant and soil functions and interactions
format: Article
creator:
  • Schreiner, R.P. (Horticultural Crops Research Lab. USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR (USA))
  • Mihara, K.L
  • McDaniel, H
  • Bethlenfalvay, G.J
subjects:
  • ABONOS FOSFATADOS
  • Agricultural soils
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Arthrobacter
  • Bacteria
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Economic plant physiology
  • ENGRAIS PHOSPHATE
  • FOSFORO
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Fungi
  • GIGASPORA
  • Gigaspora rosea
  • GLOMUS ETUNICATUM
  • GLOMUS MOSSEAE
  • GLYCINE MAX
  • Hyphae
  • PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS
  • PHOSPHORE
  • PHOSPHORUS
  • Plant growth
  • Plant roots
  • PLANT SOIL RELATIONS
  • Plants
  • Pseudomonas
  • RELACIONES PLANTA SUELO
  • RELATION PLANTE SOL
  • Soil bacteria
  • Soil fungi
  • Soil microorganisms
  • Soil plant interactions
  • Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...)
ispartof: Plant and soil, 1997, Vol.188 (2), p.199-209
description: Potted soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) plants were grown in P-fertilized (+P) or low-P soil (-P), or colonized in -P soil by one of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus etunicatum (Ge), Glomus mosseae (Gm), or Gigaspora rosea (Gr). Treatment effects on plant development, on the soil microflora, and on the status of water-stable soil aggregates (WSA) were evaluated for all 5 treatments or for the 3 AM treatments alone. Dry weights of the AM plants, as a group, were half-way between the dry weights of the +P and -P plants, but within the AM group, Gm plants had the highest pod dry weights and pod/stem and root/stem ratios and the lowest specific root lengths, while Ge plants had high stem dry weights and were highly nodulated. High reproductive development and coarse roots in the Gm plants were associated with the most extensive growth of AM soil hyphae (km pot⁻¹: Gm, 20; Gr, 12; Ge, 8), while nodulation was inversely related with AM-colonized root length. The soils colonized by AM fungi had significantly higher levels of WSA (size classes 1 to 2 and 2 to 4 mm), and within the larger size class, Gm soils had the highest percentage of WSA. Proliferation (plate counts) of Gram positive (G+) and Gram negative (G-) bacteria, Arthrobacter sp. (G+), and Pseudomonas sp. (G-) was greatest in the -P soils, but the bacterial populations of the +P and the AM soils were generally not significantly different. There were, however, differences among the AM treatments, where Gm soils had the lowest G- bacterial populations, while Ge soils had the highest populations of both G+ and G- bacteria. Correlations between plant and soil traits indicated that interactions within the plant-soil system were mediated by the AM fungi.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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titleMycorrhizal fungi influence plant and soil functions and interactions
creatorSchreiner, R.P. (Horticultural Crops Research Lab. USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR (USA)) ; Mihara, K.L ; McDaniel, H ; Bethlenfalvay, G.J
creatorcontribSchreiner, R.P. (Horticultural Crops Research Lab. USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR (USA)) ; Mihara, K.L ; McDaniel, H ; Bethlenfalvay, G.J
descriptionPotted soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) plants were grown in P-fertilized (+P) or low-P soil (-P), or colonized in -P soil by one of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus etunicatum (Ge), Glomus mosseae (Gm), or Gigaspora rosea (Gr). Treatment effects on plant development, on the soil microflora, and on the status of water-stable soil aggregates (WSA) were evaluated for all 5 treatments or for the 3 AM treatments alone. Dry weights of the AM plants, as a group, were half-way between the dry weights of the +P and -P plants, but within the AM group, Gm plants had the highest pod dry weights and pod/stem and root/stem ratios and the lowest specific root lengths, while Ge plants had high stem dry weights and were highly nodulated. High reproductive development and coarse roots in the Gm plants were associated with the most extensive growth of AM soil hyphae (km pot⁻¹: Gm, 20; Gr, 12; Ge, 8), while nodulation was inversely related with AM-colonized root length. The soils colonized by AM fungi had significantly higher levels of WSA (size classes 1 to 2 and 2 to 4 mm), and within the larger size class, Gm soils had the highest percentage of WSA. Proliferation (plate counts) of Gram positive (G+) and Gram negative (G-) bacteria, Arthrobacter sp. (G+), and Pseudomonas sp. (G-) was greatest in the -P soils, but the bacterial populations of the +P and the AM soils were generally not significantly different. There were, however, differences among the AM treatments, where Gm soils had the lowest G- bacterial populations, while Ge soils had the highest populations of both G+ and G- bacteria. Correlations between plant and soil traits indicated that interactions within the plant-soil system were mediated by the AM fungi.
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subjectABONOS FOSFATADOS ; Agricultural soils ; Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Arthrobacter ; Bacteria ; Biological and medical sciences ; Economic plant physiology ; ENGRAIS PHOSPHATE ; FOSFORO ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Fungi ; GIGASPORA ; Gigaspora rosea ; GLOMUS ETUNICATUM ; GLOMUS MOSSEAE ; GLYCINE MAX ; Hyphae ; PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS ; PHOSPHORE ; PHOSPHORUS ; Plant growth ; Plant roots ; PLANT SOIL RELATIONS ; Plants ; Pseudomonas ; RELACIONES PLANTA SUELO ; RELATION PLANTE SOL ; Soil bacteria ; Soil fungi ; Soil microorganisms ; Soil plant interactions ; Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...)
ispartofPlant and soil, 1997, Vol.188 (2), p.199-209
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descriptionPotted soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) plants were grown in P-fertilized (+P) or low-P soil (-P), or colonized in -P soil by one of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus etunicatum (Ge), Glomus mosseae (Gm), or Gigaspora rosea (Gr). Treatment effects on plant development, on the soil microflora, and on the status of water-stable soil aggregates (WSA) were evaluated for all 5 treatments or for the 3 AM treatments alone. Dry weights of the AM plants, as a group, were half-way between the dry weights of the +P and -P plants, but within the AM group, Gm plants had the highest pod dry weights and pod/stem and root/stem ratios and the lowest specific root lengths, while Ge plants had high stem dry weights and were highly nodulated. High reproductive development and coarse roots in the Gm plants were associated with the most extensive growth of AM soil hyphae (km pot⁻¹: Gm, 20; Gr, 12; Ge, 8), while nodulation was inversely related with AM-colonized root length. The soils colonized by AM fungi had significantly higher levels of WSA (size classes 1 to 2 and 2 to 4 mm), and within the larger size class, Gm soils had the highest percentage of WSA. Proliferation (plate counts) of Gram positive (G+) and Gram negative (G-) bacteria, Arthrobacter sp. (G+), and Pseudomonas sp. (G-) was greatest in the -P soils, but the bacterial populations of the +P and the AM soils were generally not significantly different. There were, however, differences among the AM treatments, where Gm soils had the lowest G- bacterial populations, while Ge soils had the highest populations of both G+ and G- bacteria. Correlations between plant and soil traits indicated that interactions within the plant-soil system were mediated by the AM fungi.
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0ABONOS FOSFATADOS
1Agricultural soils
2Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
3Arthrobacter
4Bacteria
5Biological and medical sciences
6Economic plant physiology
7ENGRAIS PHOSPHATE
8FOSFORO
9Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
10Fungi
11GIGASPORA
12Gigaspora rosea
13GLOMUS ETUNICATUM
14GLOMUS MOSSEAE
15GLYCINE MAX
16Hyphae
17PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS
18PHOSPHORE
19PHOSPHORUS
20Plant growth
21Plant roots
22PLANT SOIL RELATIONS
23Plants
24Pseudomonas
25RELACIONES PLANTA SUELO
26RELATION PLANTE SOL
27Soil bacteria
28Soil fungi
29Soil microorganisms
30Soil plant interactions
31Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...)
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titleMycorrhizal fungi influence plant and soil functions and interactions
authorSchreiner, R.P. (Horticultural Crops Research Lab. USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR (USA)) ; Mihara, K.L ; McDaniel, H ; Bethlenfalvay, G.J
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0ABONOS FOSFATADOS
1Agricultural soils
2Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
3Arthrobacter
4Bacteria
5Biological and medical sciences
6Economic plant physiology
7ENGRAIS PHOSPHATE
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17PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS
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29Soil microorganisms
30Soil plant interactions
31Symbiosis (nodules, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza...)
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abstractPotted soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) plants were grown in P-fertilized (+P) or low-P soil (-P), or colonized in -P soil by one of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus etunicatum (Ge), Glomus mosseae (Gm), or Gigaspora rosea (Gr). Treatment effects on plant development, on the soil microflora, and on the status of water-stable soil aggregates (WSA) were evaluated for all 5 treatments or for the 3 AM treatments alone. Dry weights of the AM plants, as a group, were half-way between the dry weights of the +P and -P plants, but within the AM group, Gm plants had the highest pod dry weights and pod/stem and root/stem ratios and the lowest specific root lengths, while Ge plants had high stem dry weights and were highly nodulated. High reproductive development and coarse roots in the Gm plants were associated with the most extensive growth of AM soil hyphae (km pot⁻¹: Gm, 20; Gr, 12; Ge, 8), while nodulation was inversely related with AM-colonized root length. The soils colonized by AM fungi had significantly higher levels of WSA (size classes 1 to 2 and 2 to 4 mm), and within the larger size class, Gm soils had the highest percentage of WSA. Proliferation (plate counts) of Gram positive (G+) and Gram negative (G-) bacteria, Arthrobacter sp. (G+), and Pseudomonas sp. (G-) was greatest in the -P soils, but the bacterial populations of the +P and the AM soils were generally not significantly different. There were, however, differences among the AM treatments, where Gm soils had the lowest G- bacterial populations, while Ge soils had the highest populations of both G+ and G- bacteria. Correlations between plant and soil traits indicated that interactions within the plant-soil system were mediated by the AM fungi.
copDordrecht
pubKluwer Academic Publishers
doi10.1023/A:1004271525014