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Borneo and Indochina are Major Evolutionary Hotspots for Southeast Asian Biodiversity

Tropical Southeast (SE) Asia harbors extraordinary species richness and in its entirety comprises four of the Earth's 34 biodiversity hotspots. Here, we examine the assembly of the SE Asian biota through time and space. We conduct meta-analyses of geological, climatic, and biological (including 61 p... Full description

Journal Title: Systematic biology 2014-11-01, Vol.63 (6), p.879-901
Main Author: de Bruyn, Mark
Other Authors: Stelbrink, Björn , Morley, Robert J , Hall, Robert , Carvalho, Gary R , Cannon, Charles H , van den Bergh, Gerrit , Meijaard, Erik , Metcalfe, Ian , Boitani, Luigi , Maiorano, Luigi , Shoup, Robert , von Rintelen, Thomas
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 1063-5157
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25070971
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1612990360
title: Borneo and Indochina are Major Evolutionary Hotspots for Southeast Asian Biodiversity
format: Article
creator:
  • de Bruyn, Mark
  • Stelbrink, Björn
  • Morley, Robert J
  • Hall, Robert
  • Carvalho, Gary R
  • Cannon, Charles H
  • van den Bergh, Gerrit
  • Meijaard, Erik
  • Metcalfe, Ian
  • Boitani, Luigi
  • Maiorano, Luigi
  • Shoup, Robert
  • von Rintelen, Thomas
subjects:
  • Animal Distribution
  • Animals
  • Asia, Southeastern
  • Biodiversity
  • Biological diversity
  • Biological Evolution
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Borneo
  • Datasets
  • Dispersal
  • Emigration
  • Evolution
  • Flowers & plants
  • Genetic Speciation
  • Geological Phenomena
  • Geology
  • Mammals
  • Paleoclimatology
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Plant Dispersal
  • Plants
  • Plants - classification
  • Species
ispartof: Systematic biology, 2014-11-01, Vol.63 (6), p.879-901
description: Tropical Southeast (SE) Asia harbors extraordinary species richness and in its entirety comprises four of the Earth's 34 biodiversity hotspots. Here, we examine the assembly of the SE Asian biota through time and space. We conduct meta-analyses of geological, climatic, and biological (including 61 phylogenetic) data sets to test which areas have been the sources of long-term biological diversity in SE Asia, particularly in the pre-Miocene, Miocene, and Plio-Pleistocene, and whether the respective biota have been dominated by in situ diversification, immigration and/or emigration, or equilibrium dynamics. We identify Borneo and Indochina, in particular, as major "evolutionary hotspots" for a diverse range of fauna and flora. Although most of the region's biodiversity is a result of both the accumulation of immigrants and in situ diversification, within-area diversification and subsequent emigration have been the predominant signals characterizing Indochina and Borneo's biota since at least the early Miocene. In contrast, colonization events are comparatively rare from younger volcanically active emergent islands such as Java, which show increased levels of immigration events. Few dispersal events were observed across the major biogeographic barrier of Wallace's Line. Accelerated efforts to conserve Borneo's flora and fauna in particular, currently housing the highest levels of SE Asian plant and mammal species richness, are critically required.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1063-5157
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1063-5157
  • 1076-836X
url: Link


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titleBorneo and Indochina are Major Evolutionary Hotspots for Southeast Asian Biodiversity
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creatorde Bruyn, Mark ; Stelbrink, Björn ; Morley, Robert J ; Hall, Robert ; Carvalho, Gary R ; Cannon, Charles H ; van den Bergh, Gerrit ; Meijaard, Erik ; Metcalfe, Ian ; Boitani, Luigi ; Maiorano, Luigi ; Shoup, Robert ; von Rintelen, Thomas
creatorcontribde Bruyn, Mark ; Stelbrink, Björn ; Morley, Robert J ; Hall, Robert ; Carvalho, Gary R ; Cannon, Charles H ; van den Bergh, Gerrit ; Meijaard, Erik ; Metcalfe, Ian ; Boitani, Luigi ; Maiorano, Luigi ; Shoup, Robert ; von Rintelen, Thomas
descriptionTropical Southeast (SE) Asia harbors extraordinary species richness and in its entirety comprises four of the Earth's 34 biodiversity hotspots. Here, we examine the assembly of the SE Asian biota through time and space. We conduct meta-analyses of geological, climatic, and biological (including 61 phylogenetic) data sets to test which areas have been the sources of long-term biological diversity in SE Asia, particularly in the pre-Miocene, Miocene, and Plio-Pleistocene, and whether the respective biota have been dominated by in situ diversification, immigration and/or emigration, or equilibrium dynamics. We identify Borneo and Indochina, in particular, as major "evolutionary hotspots" for a diverse range of fauna and flora. Although most of the region's biodiversity is a result of both the accumulation of immigrants and in situ diversification, within-area diversification and subsequent emigration have been the predominant signals characterizing Indochina and Borneo's biota since at least the early Miocene. In contrast, colonization events are comparatively rare from younger volcanically active emergent islands such as Java, which show increased levels of immigration events. Few dispersal events were observed across the major biogeographic barrier of Wallace's Line. Accelerated efforts to conserve Borneo's flora and fauna in particular, currently housing the highest levels of SE Asian plant and mammal species richness, are critically required.
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subjectAnimal Distribution ; Animals ; Asia, Southeastern ; Biodiversity ; Biological diversity ; Biological Evolution ; Biological taxonomies ; Borneo ; Datasets ; Dispersal ; Emigration ; Evolution ; Flowers & plants ; Genetic Speciation ; Geological Phenomena ; Geology ; Mammals ; Paleoclimatology ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Plant Dispersal ; Plants ; Plants - classification ; Species
ispartofSystematic biology, 2014-11-01, Vol.63 (6), p.879-901
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1The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com 2014
2The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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descriptionTropical Southeast (SE) Asia harbors extraordinary species richness and in its entirety comprises four of the Earth's 34 biodiversity hotspots. Here, we examine the assembly of the SE Asian biota through time and space. We conduct meta-analyses of geological, climatic, and biological (including 61 phylogenetic) data sets to test which areas have been the sources of long-term biological diversity in SE Asia, particularly in the pre-Miocene, Miocene, and Plio-Pleistocene, and whether the respective biota have been dominated by in situ diversification, immigration and/or emigration, or equilibrium dynamics. We identify Borneo and Indochina, in particular, as major "evolutionary hotspots" for a diverse range of fauna and flora. Although most of the region's biodiversity is a result of both the accumulation of immigrants and in situ diversification, within-area diversification and subsequent emigration have been the predominant signals characterizing Indochina and Borneo's biota since at least the early Miocene. In contrast, colonization events are comparatively rare from younger volcanically active emergent islands such as Java, which show increased levels of immigration events. Few dispersal events were observed across the major biogeographic barrier of Wallace's Line. Accelerated efforts to conserve Borneo's flora and fauna in particular, currently housing the highest levels of SE Asian plant and mammal species richness, are critically required.
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titleBorneo and Indochina are Major Evolutionary Hotspots for Southeast Asian Biodiversity
authorde Bruyn, Mark ; Stelbrink, Björn ; Morley, Robert J ; Hall, Robert ; Carvalho, Gary R ; Cannon, Charles H ; van den Bergh, Gerrit ; Meijaard, Erik ; Metcalfe, Ian ; Boitani, Luigi ; Maiorano, Luigi ; Shoup, Robert ; von Rintelen, Thomas
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abstractTropical Southeast (SE) Asia harbors extraordinary species richness and in its entirety comprises four of the Earth's 34 biodiversity hotspots. Here, we examine the assembly of the SE Asian biota through time and space. We conduct meta-analyses of geological, climatic, and biological (including 61 phylogenetic) data sets to test which areas have been the sources of long-term biological diversity in SE Asia, particularly in the pre-Miocene, Miocene, and Plio-Pleistocene, and whether the respective biota have been dominated by in situ diversification, immigration and/or emigration, or equilibrium dynamics. We identify Borneo and Indochina, in particular, as major "evolutionary hotspots" for a diverse range of fauna and flora. Although most of the region's biodiversity is a result of both the accumulation of immigrants and in situ diversification, within-area diversification and subsequent emigration have been the predominant signals characterizing Indochina and Borneo's biota since at least the early Miocene. In contrast, colonization events are comparatively rare from younger volcanically active emergent islands such as Java, which show increased levels of immigration events. Few dispersal events were observed across the major biogeographic barrier of Wallace's Line. Accelerated efforts to conserve Borneo's flora and fauna in particular, currently housing the highest levels of SE Asian plant and mammal species richness, are critically required.
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