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The One Percent

Recent protest movements brought attention to the one percent, a segment of the population that is critical to understanding inequality and social mobility but that attracts relatively little research attention. In this article, I survey current research on the one percent in the United States. I di... Full description

Journal Title: Annual review of sociology 2014-01-01, Vol.40 (1), p.347-367
Main Author: Keister, Lisa A.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Palo Alto: Annual Reviews
ID: ISSN: 0360-0572
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1667356095
title: The One Percent
format: Article
creator:
  • Keister, Lisa A.
subjects:
  • Consumer surveys
  • Demographics
  • Demonstrations & protests
  • Differentiation and Stratification
  • Economic recessions
  • Economic sociology
  • Finance
  • Financial assets
  • Household income
  • Households
  • Income
  • Income distribution
  • Income estimates
  • Income inequality
  • Income shares
  • Inequality
  • Literature Reviews
  • Net worth
  • Protest Movements
  • Social Inequality
  • Social Mobility
  • Social stratification
  • Sociological research
  • United States of America
  • Upward mobility
  • Wealth
ispartof: Annual review of sociology, 2014-01-01, Vol.40 (1), p.347-367
description: Recent protest movements brought attention to the one percent, a segment of the population that is critical to understanding inequality and social mobility but that attracts relatively little research attention. In this article, I survey current research on the one percent in the United States. I distinguish income from wealth and show that both are very concentrated but that the concentration of wealth, particularly financial wealth, is extremely high. I describe the demographic traits and finances of households who are in the one percent and discuss how these have changed in the past decade. I review literature that explains rising top incomes, and I propose that future research will usefully concentrate more on top wealth owners and on the demographic and life course processes that underlie income and wealth concentration. I conclude by speculating about why Americans are so tolerant of resource concentration.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0360-0572
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0360-0572
  • 1545-2115
url: Link


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descriptionRecent protest movements brought attention to the one percent, a segment of the population that is critical to understanding inequality and social mobility but that attracts relatively little research attention. In this article, I survey current research on the one percent in the United States. I distinguish income from wealth and show that both are very concentrated but that the concentration of wealth, particularly financial wealth, is extremely high. I describe the demographic traits and finances of households who are in the one percent and discuss how these have changed in the past decade. I review literature that explains rising top incomes, and I propose that future research will usefully concentrate more on top wealth owners and on the demographic and life course processes that underlie income and wealth concentration. I conclude by speculating about why Americans are so tolerant of resource concentration.
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subjectConsumer surveys ; Demographics ; Demonstrations & protests ; Differentiation and Stratification ; Economic recessions ; Economic sociology ; Finance ; Financial assets ; Household income ; Households ; Income ; Income distribution ; Income estimates ; Income inequality ; Income shares ; Inequality ; Literature Reviews ; Net worth ; Protest Movements ; Social Inequality ; Social Mobility ; Social stratification ; Sociological research ; United States of America ; Upward mobility ; Wealth
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abstractRecent protest movements brought attention to the one percent, a segment of the population that is critical to understanding inequality and social mobility but that attracts relatively little research attention. In this article, I survey current research on the one percent in the United States. I distinguish income from wealth and show that both are very concentrated but that the concentration of wealth, particularly financial wealth, is extremely high. I describe the demographic traits and finances of households who are in the one percent and discuss how these have changed in the past decade. I review literature that explains rising top incomes, and I propose that future research will usefully concentrate more on top wealth owners and on the demographic and life course processes that underlie income and wealth concentration. I conclude by speculating about why Americans are so tolerant of resource concentration.
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