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Human infections with Plasmodium knowlesi—zoonotic malaria

In 2004 a large focus of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria was reported in the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Plasmodium knowlesi, a parasite of the South-East Asian macaques (Macaca fascicularis and Macaca nemestrina), had entered the human population. Plasmodium knowlesi is transmitted b... Full description

Journal Title: Clinical microbiology and infection 2015-07, Vol.21 (7), p.640-648
Main Author: Millar, S.B
Other Authors: Cox-Singh, J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 1198-743X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25843504
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1760921955
title: Human infections with Plasmodium knowlesi—zoonotic malaria
format: Article
creator:
  • Millar, S.B
  • Cox-Singh, J
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Anopheles - parasitology
  • Antimalarials - therapeutic use
  • Asia, Southeastern - epidemiology
  • Diagnosis
  • Disease Reservoirs
  • epidemiology
  • Humans
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Insect Vectors
  • Macaca - parasitology
  • malaria
  • Malaria - diagnosis
  • Malaria - epidemiology
  • Malaria - parasitology
  • Malaria - transmission
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • pathogenesis
  • Plasmodium knowlesi
  • Plasmodium knowlesi - isolation & purification
  • transmission
  • treatment
  • Treatment Outcome
  • vectors
  • Zoonoses - diagnosis
  • Zoonoses - epidemiology
  • Zoonoses - parasitology
  • Zoonoses - transmission
  • zoonotic
ispartof: Clinical microbiology and infection, 2015-07, Vol.21 (7), p.640-648
description: In 2004 a large focus of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria was reported in the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Plasmodium knowlesi, a parasite of the South-East Asian macaques (Macaca fascicularis and Macaca nemestrina), had entered the human population. Plasmodium knowlesi is transmitted by the leucosphyrus group of Anopheline mosquitoes and transmission is largely zoonotic and restricted to the jungle setting. Humans entering jungle transmission sites are at risk. Since 2004, human cases of P. knowlesi have been continuously reported in local communities and in travellers returning from South East Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi is the most common type of indigenous malaria reported in Malaysia. Infections are most often uncomplicated but at least 10% of patients report with severe malaria and 1–2% of cases have a fatal outcome. Parasitaemia is positively associated with the clinical and laboratory markers of severe malaria. The current literature on P. knowlesi, including epidemiology, natural hosts and vectors, pathogenesis, clinical descriptions, treatment and diagnosis, is reviewed. There are many gaps in our understanding of this disease that are highlighted here with suggestions for further research to inform pre-emptive control measures that would be required to prevent a full emergence of this parasite into the human population.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1198-743X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1198-743X
  • 1469-0691
url: Link


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descriptionIn 2004 a large focus of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria was reported in the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Plasmodium knowlesi, a parasite of the South-East Asian macaques (Macaca fascicularis and Macaca nemestrina), had entered the human population. Plasmodium knowlesi is transmitted by the leucosphyrus group of Anopheline mosquitoes and transmission is largely zoonotic and restricted to the jungle setting. Humans entering jungle transmission sites are at risk. Since 2004, human cases of P. knowlesi have been continuously reported in local communities and in travellers returning from South East Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi is the most common type of indigenous malaria reported in Malaysia. Infections are most often uncomplicated but at least 10% of patients report with severe malaria and 1–2% of cases have a fatal outcome. Parasitaemia is positively associated with the clinical and laboratory markers of severe malaria. The current literature on P. knowlesi, including epidemiology, natural hosts and vectors, pathogenesis, clinical descriptions, treatment and diagnosis, is reviewed. There are many gaps in our understanding of this disease that are highlighted here with suggestions for further research to inform pre-emptive control measures that would be required to prevent a full emergence of this parasite into the human population.
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subjectAnimals ; Anopheles - parasitology ; Antimalarials - therapeutic use ; Asia, Southeastern - epidemiology ; Diagnosis ; Disease Reservoirs ; epidemiology ; Humans ; Infectious Diseases ; Insect Vectors ; Macaca - parasitology ; malaria ; Malaria - diagnosis ; Malaria - epidemiology ; Malaria - parasitology ; Malaria - transmission ; Microbiology (medical) ; pathogenesis ; Plasmodium knowlesi ; Plasmodium knowlesi - isolation & purification ; transmission ; treatment ; Treatment Outcome ; vectors ; Zoonoses - diagnosis ; Zoonoses - epidemiology ; Zoonoses - parasitology ; Zoonoses - transmission ; zoonotic
ispartofClinical microbiology and infection, 2015-07, Vol.21 (7), p.640-648
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abstractIn 2004 a large focus of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria was reported in the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Plasmodium knowlesi, a parasite of the South-East Asian macaques (Macaca fascicularis and Macaca nemestrina), had entered the human population. Plasmodium knowlesi is transmitted by the leucosphyrus group of Anopheline mosquitoes and transmission is largely zoonotic and restricted to the jungle setting. Humans entering jungle transmission sites are at risk. Since 2004, human cases of P. knowlesi have been continuously reported in local communities and in travellers returning from South East Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi is the most common type of indigenous malaria reported in Malaysia. Infections are most often uncomplicated but at least 10% of patients report with severe malaria and 1–2% of cases have a fatal outcome. Parasitaemia is positively associated with the clinical and laboratory markers of severe malaria. The current literature on P. knowlesi, including epidemiology, natural hosts and vectors, pathogenesis, clinical descriptions, treatment and diagnosis, is reviewed. There are many gaps in our understanding of this disease that are highlighted here with suggestions for further research to inform pre-emptive control measures that would be required to prevent a full emergence of this parasite into the human population.
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