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Decomposition of 51 semidesert species from wide-ranging phylogeny is faster in standing and sand-buried than in surface leaf litters: implications for carbon and nutrient dynamics

Background and aims Higher than expected litter decomposition rates have been observed in dry, sunny environments due to photochemical or physical degradation. However, our understanding of carbon and nutrient fluxes of standing and buried litters compared to surface litter in such areas is still sc... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2015-11-01, Vol.396 (1/2), p.175-187
Main Author: Liu, Guofang
Other Authors: Cornwell, W.K , Pan, Xu , Ye, Duo , Liu, Fenghong , Huang, Zhenying , Dong, Ming , Cornelissen, J.H.C
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
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Publisher: Cham: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1762366333
title: Decomposition of 51 semidesert species from wide-ranging phylogeny is faster in standing and sand-buried than in surface leaf litters: implications for carbon and nutrient dynamics
format: Article
creator:
  • Liu, Guofang
  • Cornwell, W.K
  • Pan, Xu
  • Ye, Duo
  • Liu, Fenghong
  • Huang, Zhenying
  • Dong, Ming
  • Cornelissen, J.H.C
subjects:
  • Biodegradation
  • Biogeochemistry
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Carbon
  • Decomposition
  • Deserts
  • Ecology
  • Environmental aspects
  • Flowers & plants
  • Genetic aspects
  • Life Sciences
  • Natural history
  • Observations
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant populations
  • Plant Sciences
  • Regular Article
  • Soil Science & Conservation
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2015-11-01, Vol.396 (1/2), p.175-187
description: Background and aims Higher than expected litter decomposition rates have been observed in dry, sunny environments due to photochemical or physical degradation. However, our understanding of carbon and nutrient fluxes of standing and buried litters compared to surface litter in such areas is still scarce. Methods We sampled leaf litters from 51 species in a semiarid dune ecosystem and incubated them in three positions: surface, sand-buried and simulated standing. Results Decomposition was much faster in buried litter and somewhat faster in simulated standing litter than in surface litter. This pattern was independent of the incubation period, phylogenetic group or growth form. Litter position and incubation period significantly impacted litter nutrient dynamics. The nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses were faster in buried and simulated standing litters than in surface litter. The N loss was slower than P loss in 6-month decomposed litter but the former was relatively faster than the latter in the second phase up to 12 months of incubation. Conclusions Our study shows that substantial mass and nutrient losses in simulated standing and buried litters can be a candidate explanation why drylands have higher carbon and nutrient fluxes than expected based on surface litter decomposition data alone.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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titleDecomposition of 51 semidesert species from wide-ranging phylogeny is faster in standing and sand-buried than in surface leaf litters: implications for carbon and nutrient dynamics
creatorLiu, Guofang ; Cornwell, W.K ; Pan, Xu ; Ye, Duo ; Liu, Fenghong ; Huang, Zhenying ; Dong, Ming ; Cornelissen, J.H.C
creatorcontribLiu, Guofang ; Cornwell, W.K ; Pan, Xu ; Ye, Duo ; Liu, Fenghong ; Huang, Zhenying ; Dong, Ming ; Cornelissen, J.H.C
descriptionBackground and aims Higher than expected litter decomposition rates have been observed in dry, sunny environments due to photochemical or physical degradation. However, our understanding of carbon and nutrient fluxes of standing and buried litters compared to surface litter in such areas is still scarce. Methods We sampled leaf litters from 51 species in a semiarid dune ecosystem and incubated them in three positions: surface, sand-buried and simulated standing. Results Decomposition was much faster in buried litter and somewhat faster in simulated standing litter than in surface litter. This pattern was independent of the incubation period, phylogenetic group or growth form. Litter position and incubation period significantly impacted litter nutrient dynamics. The nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses were faster in buried and simulated standing litters than in surface litter. The N loss was slower than P loss in 6-month decomposed litter but the former was relatively faster than the latter in the second phase up to 12 months of incubation. Conclusions Our study shows that substantial mass and nutrient losses in simulated standing and buried litters can be a candidate explanation why drylands have higher carbon and nutrient fluxes than expected based on surface litter decomposition data alone.
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subjectBiodegradation ; Biogeochemistry ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Carbon ; Decomposition ; Deserts ; Ecology ; Environmental aspects ; Flowers & plants ; Genetic aspects ; Life Sciences ; Natural history ; Observations ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Plant Physiology ; Plant populations ; Plant Sciences ; Regular Article ; Soil Science & Conservation
ispartofPlant and soil, 2015-11-01, Vol.396 (1/2), p.175-187
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descriptionBackground and aims Higher than expected litter decomposition rates have been observed in dry, sunny environments due to photochemical or physical degradation. However, our understanding of carbon and nutrient fluxes of standing and buried litters compared to surface litter in such areas is still scarce. Methods We sampled leaf litters from 51 species in a semiarid dune ecosystem and incubated them in three positions: surface, sand-buried and simulated standing. Results Decomposition was much faster in buried litter and somewhat faster in simulated standing litter than in surface litter. This pattern was independent of the incubation period, phylogenetic group or growth form. Litter position and incubation period significantly impacted litter nutrient dynamics. The nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses were faster in buried and simulated standing litters than in surface litter. The N loss was slower than P loss in 6-month decomposed litter but the former was relatively faster than the latter in the second phase up to 12 months of incubation. Conclusions Our study shows that substantial mass and nutrient losses in simulated standing and buried litters can be a candidate explanation why drylands have higher carbon and nutrient fluxes than expected based on surface litter decomposition data alone.
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titleDecomposition of 51 semidesert species from wide-ranging phylogeny is faster in standing and sand-buried than in surface leaf litters: implications for carbon and nutrient dynamics
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abstractBackground and aims Higher than expected litter decomposition rates have been observed in dry, sunny environments due to photochemical or physical degradation. However, our understanding of carbon and nutrient fluxes of standing and buried litters compared to surface litter in such areas is still scarce. Methods We sampled leaf litters from 51 species in a semiarid dune ecosystem and incubated them in three positions: surface, sand-buried and simulated standing. Results Decomposition was much faster in buried litter and somewhat faster in simulated standing litter than in surface litter. This pattern was independent of the incubation period, phylogenetic group or growth form. Litter position and incubation period significantly impacted litter nutrient dynamics. The nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses were faster in buried and simulated standing litters than in surface litter. The N loss was slower than P loss in 6-month decomposed litter but the former was relatively faster than the latter in the second phase up to 12 months of incubation. Conclusions Our study shows that substantial mass and nutrient losses in simulated standing and buried litters can be a candidate explanation why drylands have higher carbon and nutrient fluxes than expected based on surface litter decomposition data alone.
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