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Fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of depression: A meta-analysis

Abstract Objective Epidemiologic investigations evaluating the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with depression risk have yielded controversial results. Therefore, a meta-analysis was carried out to qualitatively summarize the evidence regarding association of fruit and vegetable intak... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition (Burbank Los Angeles County, Calif.), 2016, Vol.32 (3), p.296-302
Main Author: Liu, Xiaoqin, M.D
Other Authors: Yan, Ying, Ph.D , Li, Fang, M.D , Zhang, Dongfeng, M.D
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Age
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0899-9007
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26691768
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1762968365
title: Fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of depression: A meta-analysis
format: Article
creator:
  • Liu, Xiaoqin, M.D
  • Yan, Ying, Ph.D
  • Li, Fang, M.D
  • Zhang, Dongfeng, M.D
subjects:
  • Age
  • Behavior
  • Confidence intervals
  • Consumption
  • Depression
  • Depression - epidemiology
  • Diet
  • Epidemiology
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Food
  • Fruit
  • Fruits
  • Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • Geriatrics
  • Health risk assessment
  • Humans
  • Inventory
  • Mental depression
  • Mental disorders
  • Meta-analysis
  • Observational Studies as Topic
  • Risk Factors
  • Studies
  • Vegetable
  • Vegetables
ispartof: Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 2016, Vol.32 (3), p.296-302
description: Abstract Objective Epidemiologic investigations evaluating the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with depression risk have yielded controversial results. Therefore, a meta-analysis was carried out to qualitatively summarize the evidence regarding association of fruit and vegetable intake with risk of depression in the general population. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant articles published up to June 2015. To evaluate the association of fruit and vegetable intake with depression risk, combined relative risks were calculated with the fixed or random effects model. Meta-regression was conducted to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. Publication bias was estimated by the Egger's test and the funnel plot. Results Ten studies involving 227 852 participants for fruit intake and eight studies involving 218 699 participants for vegetable intake were finally included in this study. The combined relative risk (95% confidence interval) of depression for the highest versus lowest category of fruit and vegetable intake was 0.86 (0.81, 0.91; P  
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0899-9007
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0899-9007
  • 1873-1244
url: Link


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descriptionAbstract Objective Epidemiologic investigations evaluating the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with depression risk have yielded controversial results. Therefore, a meta-analysis was carried out to qualitatively summarize the evidence regarding association of fruit and vegetable intake with risk of depression in the general population. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant articles published up to June 2015. To evaluate the association of fruit and vegetable intake with depression risk, combined relative risks were calculated with the fixed or random effects model. Meta-regression was conducted to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. Publication bias was estimated by the Egger's test and the funnel plot. Results Ten studies involving 227 852 participants for fruit intake and eight studies involving 218 699 participants for vegetable intake were finally included in this study. The combined relative risk (95% confidence interval) of depression for the highest versus lowest category of fruit and vegetable intake was 0.86 (0.81, 0.91; P  < 0.01) and 0.89 (0.83, 0.94; P  < 0.01), respectively. In subgroup analyses stratified by study design, the inverse association of fruit (0.83 [0.77, 0.91; P  = 0.006]) and vegetable (0.88 [0.79, 0.96; P  = 0.007]) intake with risk of depression was also observed in the cohort study. Conclusions This meta-analysis indicated that fruit and vegetable consumption might be inversely associated with the risk of depression, respectively.
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subjectAge ; Behavior ; Confidence intervals ; Consumption ; Depression ; Depression - epidemiology ; Diet ; Epidemiology ; Feeding Behavior ; Food ; Fruit ; Fruits ; Gastroenterology and Hepatology ; Geriatrics ; Health risk assessment ; Humans ; Inventory ; Mental depression ; Mental disorders ; Meta-analysis ; Observational Studies as Topic ; Risk Factors ; Studies ; Vegetable ; Vegetables
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descriptionAbstract Objective Epidemiologic investigations evaluating the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with depression risk have yielded controversial results. Therefore, a meta-analysis was carried out to qualitatively summarize the evidence regarding association of fruit and vegetable intake with risk of depression in the general population. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant articles published up to June 2015. To evaluate the association of fruit and vegetable intake with depression risk, combined relative risks were calculated with the fixed or random effects model. Meta-regression was conducted to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. Publication bias was estimated by the Egger's test and the funnel plot. Results Ten studies involving 227 852 participants for fruit intake and eight studies involving 218 699 participants for vegetable intake were finally included in this study. The combined relative risk (95% confidence interval) of depression for the highest versus lowest category of fruit and vegetable intake was 0.86 (0.81, 0.91; P  < 0.01) and 0.89 (0.83, 0.94; P  < 0.01), respectively. In subgroup analyses stratified by study design, the inverse association of fruit (0.83 [0.77, 0.91; P  = 0.006]) and vegetable (0.88 [0.79, 0.96; P  = 0.007]) intake with risk of depression was also observed in the cohort study. Conclusions This meta-analysis indicated that fruit and vegetable consumption might be inversely associated with the risk of depression, respectively.
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abstractAbstract Objective Epidemiologic investigations evaluating the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with depression risk have yielded controversial results. Therefore, a meta-analysis was carried out to qualitatively summarize the evidence regarding association of fruit and vegetable intake with risk of depression in the general population. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant articles published up to June 2015. To evaluate the association of fruit and vegetable intake with depression risk, combined relative risks were calculated with the fixed or random effects model. Meta-regression was conducted to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. Publication bias was estimated by the Egger's test and the funnel plot. Results Ten studies involving 227 852 participants for fruit intake and eight studies involving 218 699 participants for vegetable intake were finally included in this study. The combined relative risk (95% confidence interval) of depression for the highest versus lowest category of fruit and vegetable intake was 0.86 (0.81, 0.91; P  < 0.01) and 0.89 (0.83, 0.94; P  < 0.01), respectively. In subgroup analyses stratified by study design, the inverse association of fruit (0.83 [0.77, 0.91; P  = 0.006]) and vegetable (0.88 [0.79, 0.96; P  = 0.007]) intake with risk of depression was also observed in the cohort study. Conclusions This meta-analysis indicated that fruit and vegetable consumption might be inversely associated with the risk of depression, respectively.
copUnited States
pubElsevier Inc
pmid26691768
doi10.1016/j.nut.2015.09.009