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Obesity, Metabolic Health, and History of Cytomegalovirus Infection in the General Population

Context: Common community-acquired infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, but empirical evidence is scarce. Objective: We examined the associations between CMV, obesity, and metabolic characteristics in a large, general popul... Full description

Journal Title: The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 2016-04, Vol.101 (4), p.1680-1685
Main Author: Hamer, Mark
Other Authors: Batty, G. David , Kivimäki, Mika
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Endocrine Society
ID: ISSN: 0021-972X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26863425
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title: Obesity, Metabolic Health, and History of Cytomegalovirus Infection in the General Population
format: Article
creator:
  • Hamer, Mark
  • Batty, G. David
  • Kivimäki, Mika
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Blood Pressure - physiology
  • Body Mass Index
  • C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
  • Cholesterol, HDL - blood
  • Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
  • Cytomegalovirus Infections - blood
  • Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis
  • Cytomegalovirus Infections - physiopathology
  • Female
  • Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
  • Humans
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Obesity - blood
  • Obesity - diagnosis
  • Obesity - physiopathology
  • Triglycerides - blood
ispartof: The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 2016-04, Vol.101 (4), p.1680-1685
description: Context: Common community-acquired infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, but empirical evidence is scarce. Objective: We examined the associations between CMV, obesity, and metabolic characteristics in a large, general population–based sample of adults. Design and Setting, and Participants: This was an observational study in community dwelling adults from the general population, Understanding Society–the UK Household Longitudinal Study composed on 9517 men and women (age 52.4 ± 16.4 y; 55.3% female). Measures: CMV infection was measured IgG from serum. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥30 kg/m2. Based on blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glycated hemoglobin A1c, and C-reactive protein, participants were classified as either Healthy (0 or 1 metabolic abnormality) or Unhealthy (≥2 metabolic abnormalities). Results: A positive CMV test was recorded in 47.5% of the sample. There was no association between CMV and obesity. Of the individual metabolic risk factors, CMV was positively associated with glycated hemoglobin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In combination, only Unhealthy Nonobese participants had modestly increased odds of CMV (odds ratio compared with healthy normal-weight, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.00–1.26) after adjusting for a range of variables. CMV was associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (odds ratio, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07–2.60) independently of obesity, metabolic risk factors, and other covariates. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a weak but statistically significant association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in nonobese adults. This relationship seems to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism. Common community-acquired infections, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction. The authors demonstrate a weak association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in non-obese adults. This relationship appears to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0021-972X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0021-972X
  • 1945-7197
url: Link


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titleObesity, Metabolic Health, and History of Cytomegalovirus Infection in the General Population
creatorHamer, Mark ; Batty, G. David ; Kivimäki, Mika
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descriptionContext: Common community-acquired infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, but empirical evidence is scarce. Objective: We examined the associations between CMV, obesity, and metabolic characteristics in a large, general population–based sample of adults. Design and Setting, and Participants: This was an observational study in community dwelling adults from the general population, Understanding Society–the UK Household Longitudinal Study composed on 9517 men and women (age 52.4 ± 16.4 y; 55.3% female). Measures: CMV infection was measured IgG from serum. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥30 kg/m2. Based on blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glycated hemoglobin A1c, and C-reactive protein, participants were classified as either Healthy (0 or 1 metabolic abnormality) or Unhealthy (≥2 metabolic abnormalities). Results: A positive CMV test was recorded in 47.5% of the sample. There was no association between CMV and obesity. Of the individual metabolic risk factors, CMV was positively associated with glycated hemoglobin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In combination, only Unhealthy Nonobese participants had modestly increased odds of CMV (odds ratio compared with healthy normal-weight, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.00–1.26) after adjusting for a range of variables. CMV was associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (odds ratio, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07–2.60) independently of obesity, metabolic risk factors, and other covariates. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a weak but statistically significant association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in nonobese adults. This relationship seems to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism. Common community-acquired infections, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction. The authors demonstrate a weak association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in non-obese adults. This relationship appears to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism.
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subjectAdult ; Aged ; Blood Pressure - physiology ; Body Mass Index ; C-Reactive Protein - metabolism ; Cholesterol, HDL - blood ; Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification ; Cytomegalovirus Infections - blood ; Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis ; Cytomegalovirus Infections - physiopathology ; Female ; Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism ; Humans ; Longitudinal Studies ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Obesity - blood ; Obesity - diagnosis ; Obesity - physiopathology ; Triglycerides - blood
ispartofThe journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 2016-04, Vol.101 (4), p.1680-1685
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descriptionContext: Common community-acquired infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, but empirical evidence is scarce. Objective: We examined the associations between CMV, obesity, and metabolic characteristics in a large, general population–based sample of adults. Design and Setting, and Participants: This was an observational study in community dwelling adults from the general population, Understanding Society–the UK Household Longitudinal Study composed on 9517 men and women (age 52.4 ± 16.4 y; 55.3% female). Measures: CMV infection was measured IgG from serum. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥30 kg/m2. Based on blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glycated hemoglobin A1c, and C-reactive protein, participants were classified as either Healthy (0 or 1 metabolic abnormality) or Unhealthy (≥2 metabolic abnormalities). Results: A positive CMV test was recorded in 47.5% of the sample. There was no association between CMV and obesity. Of the individual metabolic risk factors, CMV was positively associated with glycated hemoglobin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In combination, only Unhealthy Nonobese participants had modestly increased odds of CMV (odds ratio compared with healthy normal-weight, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.00–1.26) after adjusting for a range of variables. CMV was associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (odds ratio, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07–2.60) independently of obesity, metabolic risk factors, and other covariates. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a weak but statistically significant association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in nonobese adults. This relationship seems to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism. Common community-acquired infections, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction. The authors demonstrate a weak association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in non-obese adults. This relationship appears to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism.
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notesM.H. acknowledges support from the National Institute for Health Research Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit, which is a partnership between University Hospitals of Leicester National Health Service Trust, Loughborough University and the University of Leicester.
abstractContext: Common community-acquired infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, but empirical evidence is scarce. Objective: We examined the associations between CMV, obesity, and metabolic characteristics in a large, general population–based sample of adults. Design and Setting, and Participants: This was an observational study in community dwelling adults from the general population, Understanding Society–the UK Household Longitudinal Study composed on 9517 men and women (age 52.4 ± 16.4 y; 55.3% female). Measures: CMV infection was measured IgG from serum. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥30 kg/m2. Based on blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glycated hemoglobin A1c, and C-reactive protein, participants were classified as either Healthy (0 or 1 metabolic abnormality) or Unhealthy (≥2 metabolic abnormalities). Results: A positive CMV test was recorded in 47.5% of the sample. There was no association between CMV and obesity. Of the individual metabolic risk factors, CMV was positively associated with glycated hemoglobin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In combination, only Unhealthy Nonobese participants had modestly increased odds of CMV (odds ratio compared with healthy normal-weight, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.00–1.26) after adjusting for a range of variables. CMV was associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (odds ratio, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07–2.60) independently of obesity, metabolic risk factors, and other covariates. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a weak but statistically significant association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in nonobese adults. This relationship seems to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism. Common community-acquired infections, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), may contribute to the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction. The authors demonstrate a weak association between CMV and metabolic dysfunction in non-obese adults. This relationship appears to be masked in the obese, possibly by the effects of excess adiposity on metabolism.
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