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Decreased monocyte activation with daily acyclovir use in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfected women

ObjectivesSeveral clinical trials have demonstrated that daily treatment of HIV-infected individuals with the antiherpes drug acyclovir slightly decreases HIV-1 viral load and slows disease progression. This study examines if this slowing in clinical progression is a direct cause of the decrease in... Full description

Journal Title: Sexually transmitted infections 2015, Vol.91 (7), p.485-488
Main Author: Redd, Andrew D
Other Authors: Newell, Kevin , Patel, Eshan U , Nalugoda, Fred , Ssebbowa, Paschal , Kalibbala, Sarah , Frank, Melanie A , Tobian, Aaron A R , Gray, Ronald H , Quinn, Thomas C , Serwadda, David , Reynolds, Steven J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: England: British Medical Association
ID: ISSN: 1368-4973
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25904747
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title: Decreased monocyte activation with daily acyclovir use in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfected women
format: Article
creator:
  • Redd, Andrew D
  • Newell, Kevin
  • Patel, Eshan U
  • Nalugoda, Fred
  • Ssebbowa, Paschal
  • Kalibbala, Sarah
  • Frank, Melanie A
  • Tobian, Aaron A R
  • Gray, Ronald H
  • Quinn, Thomas C
  • Serwadda, David
  • Reynolds, Steven J
subjects:
  • Acyclovir
  • Acyclovir - therapeutic use
  • Adult
  • Antiviral Agents - therapeutic use
  • C-Reactive Protein - analysis
  • Care and treatment
  • Clinical trials
  • Disease Progression
  • Dosage and administration
  • Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
  • Female
  • Health aspects
  • Herpes Genitalis - complications
  • Herpes Genitalis - drug therapy
  • Herpes Genitalis - immunology
  • Herpesviridae
  • Herpesvirus 2, Human - isolation & purification
  • HIV infection
  • HIV infection in women
  • HIV Infections - complications
  • HIV Infections - drug therapy
  • HIV Infections - immunology
  • HIV-1 - isolation & purification
  • Humans
  • Lentivirus
  • Lipopolysaccharide Receptors - blood
  • Middle Aged
  • Monocytes - chemistry
  • Monocytes - immunology
  • Prevention
  • Retroviridae
  • Women
  • Young Adult
ispartof: Sexually transmitted infections, 2015, Vol.91 (7), p.485-488
description: ObjectivesSeveral clinical trials have demonstrated that daily treatment of HIV-infected individuals with the antiherpes drug acyclovir slightly decreases HIV-1 viral load and slows disease progression. This study examines if this slowing in clinical progression is a direct cause of the decrease in viral load or an indirect effect of lower immune activation due to lower levels of herpetic reactivation.MethodsWomen who participated in a randomised clinical trial of daily acyclovir use (n=301) were monitored every 6 months for changes in immune activation. Soluble CD14 (sCD14), a marker for monocyte activation, and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker for general immune activation, were measured by ELISA.ResultsInitial levels of sCD14 and CRP were not predictive of HIV disease progression when controlling for initial CD4+ cell count and HIV viral load. sCD14 levels, but not CRP, decreased in the acyclovir treatment arm at a significantly faster rate than the placebo group, which was independent of changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in a multivariant mixed-effects model (p=0.039). However, the magnitude of this decrease was relatively small with a total estimated decrease of sCD14 of 15% of initial levels.ConclusionsThese data suggest that decreased monocyte activation may play a minor role in the ability of daily acyclovir use to slow HIV disease progression.Clinical trial registration numberNCT00405821
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1368-4973
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1368-4973
  • 1472-3263
url: Link


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titleDecreased monocyte activation with daily acyclovir use in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfected women
creatorRedd, Andrew D ; Newell, Kevin ; Patel, Eshan U ; Nalugoda, Fred ; Ssebbowa, Paschal ; Kalibbala, Sarah ; Frank, Melanie A ; Tobian, Aaron A R ; Gray, Ronald H ; Quinn, Thomas C ; Serwadda, David ; Reynolds, Steven J
creatorcontribRedd, Andrew D ; Newell, Kevin ; Patel, Eshan U ; Nalugoda, Fred ; Ssebbowa, Paschal ; Kalibbala, Sarah ; Frank, Melanie A ; Tobian, Aaron A R ; Gray, Ronald H ; Quinn, Thomas C ; Serwadda, David ; Reynolds, Steven J
descriptionObjectivesSeveral clinical trials have demonstrated that daily treatment of HIV-infected individuals with the antiherpes drug acyclovir slightly decreases HIV-1 viral load and slows disease progression. This study examines if this slowing in clinical progression is a direct cause of the decrease in viral load or an indirect effect of lower immune activation due to lower levels of herpetic reactivation.MethodsWomen who participated in a randomised clinical trial of daily acyclovir use (n=301) were monitored every 6 months for changes in immune activation. Soluble CD14 (sCD14), a marker for monocyte activation, and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker for general immune activation, were measured by ELISA.ResultsInitial levels of sCD14 and CRP were not predictive of HIV disease progression when controlling for initial CD4+ cell count and HIV viral load. sCD14 levels, but not CRP, decreased in the acyclovir treatment arm at a significantly faster rate than the placebo group, which was independent of changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in a multivariant mixed-effects model (p=0.039). However, the magnitude of this decrease was relatively small with a total estimated decrease of sCD14 of 15% of initial levels.ConclusionsThese data suggest that decreased monocyte activation may play a minor role in the ability of daily acyclovir use to slow HIV disease progression.Clinical trial registration numberNCT00405821
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subjectAcyclovir ; Acyclovir - therapeutic use ; Adult ; Antiviral Agents - therapeutic use ; C-Reactive Protein - analysis ; Care and treatment ; Clinical trials ; Disease Progression ; Dosage and administration ; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay ; Female ; Health aspects ; Herpes Genitalis - complications ; Herpes Genitalis - drug therapy ; Herpes Genitalis - immunology ; Herpesviridae ; Herpesvirus 2, Human - isolation & purification ; HIV infection ; HIV infection in women ; HIV Infections - complications ; HIV Infections - drug therapy ; HIV Infections - immunology ; HIV-1 - isolation & purification ; Humans ; Lentivirus ; Lipopolysaccharide Receptors - blood ; Middle Aged ; Monocytes - chemistry ; Monocytes - immunology ; Prevention ; Retroviridae ; Women ; Young Adult
ispartofSexually transmitted infections, 2015, Vol.91 (7), p.485-488
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2Copyright: 2015 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions
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9Quinn, Thomas C
10Serwadda, David
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descriptionObjectivesSeveral clinical trials have demonstrated that daily treatment of HIV-infected individuals with the antiherpes drug acyclovir slightly decreases HIV-1 viral load and slows disease progression. This study examines if this slowing in clinical progression is a direct cause of the decrease in viral load or an indirect effect of lower immune activation due to lower levels of herpetic reactivation.MethodsWomen who participated in a randomised clinical trial of daily acyclovir use (n=301) were monitored every 6 months for changes in immune activation. Soluble CD14 (sCD14), a marker for monocyte activation, and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker for general immune activation, were measured by ELISA.ResultsInitial levels of sCD14 and CRP were not predictive of HIV disease progression when controlling for initial CD4+ cell count and HIV viral load. sCD14 levels, but not CRP, decreased in the acyclovir treatment arm at a significantly faster rate than the placebo group, which was independent of changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in a multivariant mixed-effects model (p=0.039). However, the magnitude of this decrease was relatively small with a total estimated decrease of sCD14 of 15% of initial levels.ConclusionsThese data suggest that decreased monocyte activation may play a minor role in the ability of daily acyclovir use to slow HIV disease progression.Clinical trial registration numberNCT00405821
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4C-Reactive Protein - analysis
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19HIV Infections - complications
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21HIV Infections - immunology
22HIV-1 - isolation & purification
23Humans
24Lentivirus
25Lipopolysaccharide Receptors - blood
26Middle Aged
27Monocytes - chemistry
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29Prevention
30Retroviridae
31Women
32Young Adult
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titleDecreased monocyte activation with daily acyclovir use in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfected women
authorRedd, Andrew D ; Newell, Kevin ; Patel, Eshan U ; Nalugoda, Fred ; Ssebbowa, Paschal ; Kalibbala, Sarah ; Frank, Melanie A ; Tobian, Aaron A R ; Gray, Ronald H ; Quinn, Thomas C ; Serwadda, David ; Reynolds, Steven J
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0Acyclovir
1Acyclovir - therapeutic use
2Adult
3Antiviral Agents - therapeutic use
4C-Reactive Protein - analysis
5Care and treatment
6Clinical trials
7Disease Progression
8Dosage and administration
9Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
10Female
11Health aspects
12Herpes Genitalis - complications
13Herpes Genitalis - drug therapy
14Herpes Genitalis - immunology
15Herpesviridae
16Herpesvirus 2, Human - isolation & purification
17HIV infection
18HIV infection in women
19HIV Infections - complications
20HIV Infections - drug therapy
21HIV Infections - immunology
22HIV-1 - isolation & purification
23Humans
24Lentivirus
25Lipopolysaccharide Receptors - blood
26Middle Aged
27Monocytes - chemistry
28Monocytes - immunology
29Prevention
30Retroviridae
31Women
32Young Adult
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jtitleSexually transmitted infections
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1Newell, Kevin
2Patel, Eshan U
3Nalugoda, Fred
4Ssebbowa, Paschal
5Kalibbala, Sarah
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7Tobian, Aaron A R
8Gray, Ronald H
9Quinn, Thomas C
10Serwadda, David
11Reynolds, Steven J
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atitleDecreased monocyte activation with daily acyclovir use in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfected women
jtitleSexually transmitted infections
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date2015-11
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volume91
issue7
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pages485-488
issn1368-4973
eissn1472-3263
abstractObjectivesSeveral clinical trials have demonstrated that daily treatment of HIV-infected individuals with the antiherpes drug acyclovir slightly decreases HIV-1 viral load and slows disease progression. This study examines if this slowing in clinical progression is a direct cause of the decrease in viral load or an indirect effect of lower immune activation due to lower levels of herpetic reactivation.MethodsWomen who participated in a randomised clinical trial of daily acyclovir use (n=301) were monitored every 6 months for changes in immune activation. Soluble CD14 (sCD14), a marker for monocyte activation, and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker for general immune activation, were measured by ELISA.ResultsInitial levels of sCD14 and CRP were not predictive of HIV disease progression when controlling for initial CD4+ cell count and HIV viral load. sCD14 levels, but not CRP, decreased in the acyclovir treatment arm at a significantly faster rate than the placebo group, which was independent of changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in a multivariant mixed-effects model (p=0.039). However, the magnitude of this decrease was relatively small with a total estimated decrease of sCD14 of 15% of initial levels.ConclusionsThese data suggest that decreased monocyte activation may play a minor role in the ability of daily acyclovir use to slow HIV disease progression.Clinical trial registration numberNCT00405821
copEngland
pubBritish Medical Association
pmid25904747
doi10.1136/sextrans-2014-051867