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Influence of relative humidity on prolonged exercise capacity in a warm environment

This study examined the influence of relative humidity on endurance exercise performance in a warm environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70% maximum oxygen uptake until volitional exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30.2 ± 0.2°C. Volunteers were... Full description

Journal Title: European journal of applied physiology 2011, Vol.112 (6), p.2313-2321
Main Author: Maughan, Ronald J
Other Authors: Otani, Hidenori , Watson, Phillip
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag
ID: ISSN: 1439-6319
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1837298764
title: Influence of relative humidity on prolonged exercise capacity in a warm environment
format: Article
creator:
  • Maughan, Ronald J
  • Otani, Hidenori
  • Watson, Phillip
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Biomedicine
  • Body Temperature - physiology
  • Body Temperature Regulation - physiology
  • Exercise
  • Exercise - physiology
  • Exercise Test - methods
  • Fatigue - physiopathology
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Heart beat
  • Heart Rate - physiology
  • Hot Temperature
  • Human Physiology
  • Humans
  • Humidity
  • Male
  • Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine
  • Original Article
  • Oxygen Consumption - physiology
  • Physical Endurance - physiology
  • Regional Blood Flow - physiology
  • Rest - physiology
  • Skin
  • Skin Temperature - physiology
  • Sports Medicine
  • Sweating - physiology
  • Vertebrates: body movement. Posture. Locomotion. Flight. Swimming. Physical exercise. Rest. Sports
ispartof: European journal of applied physiology, 2011, Vol.112 (6), p.2313-2321
description: This study examined the influence of relative humidity on endurance exercise performance in a warm environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70% maximum oxygen uptake until volitional exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30.2 ± 0.2°C. Volunteers were tested under four relative humidity (rh) conditions: 24, 40, 60 and 80%. Core and weighted mean skin temperature, heart rate, skin blood flow, and cutaneous vascular conductance were recorded at rest and at regular intervals during exercise. Mean ± SD time to exhaustion was 68 ± 19, 60 ± 17, 54 ± 17, and 46 ± 14 min at 24, 40, 60, and 80% rh, respectively ( P  
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1439-6319
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1439-6319
  • 1439-6327
url: Link


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descriptionThis study examined the influence of relative humidity on endurance exercise performance in a warm environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70% maximum oxygen uptake until volitional exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30.2 ± 0.2°C. Volunteers were tested under four relative humidity (rh) conditions: 24, 40, 60 and 80%. Core and weighted mean skin temperature, heart rate, skin blood flow, and cutaneous vascular conductance were recorded at rest and at regular intervals during exercise. Mean ± SD time to exhaustion was 68 ± 19, 60 ± 17, 54 ± 17, and 46 ± 14 min at 24, 40, 60, and 80% rh, respectively ( P  < 0.001); exercise time was significantly less at 60% ( P  = 0.013) and 80% ( P  = 0.005) rh than recorded at 24% rh. There were no differences in core temperature ( P  = 0.480) and heart rate ( P  = 0.097) between trials. Core temperature at exhaustion was 39.0 ± 0.3°C at 24, 40, and 60% rh and 39.1 ± 0.3°C at 80% rh ( P  = 0.159). Mean skin temperature at the point of exhaustion was higher at 80% rh than at 24% rh ( P  < 0.001). Total sweat loss was similar between trials ( P  = 0.345), but sweating rate was higher at 60 and 80% rh than at 24% rh ( P  < 0.001). The results suggest that exercise capacity at moderate intensity in a warm environment is progressively impaired as the relative humidity increases.
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subjectAdult ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Biomedicine ; Body Temperature - physiology ; Body Temperature Regulation - physiology ; Exercise ; Exercise - physiology ; Exercise Test - methods ; Fatigue - physiopathology ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Heart beat ; Heart Rate - physiology ; Hot Temperature ; Human Physiology ; Humans ; Humidity ; Male ; Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine ; Original Article ; Oxygen Consumption - physiology ; Physical Endurance - physiology ; Regional Blood Flow - physiology ; Rest - physiology ; Skin ; Skin Temperature - physiology ; Sports Medicine ; Sweating - physiology ; Vertebrates: body movement. Posture. Locomotion. Flight. Swimming. Physical exercise. Rest. Sports
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descriptionThis study examined the influence of relative humidity on endurance exercise performance in a warm environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70% maximum oxygen uptake until volitional exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30.2 ± 0.2°C. Volunteers were tested under four relative humidity (rh) conditions: 24, 40, 60 and 80%. Core and weighted mean skin temperature, heart rate, skin blood flow, and cutaneous vascular conductance were recorded at rest and at regular intervals during exercise. Mean ± SD time to exhaustion was 68 ± 19, 60 ± 17, 54 ± 17, and 46 ± 14 min at 24, 40, 60, and 80% rh, respectively ( P  < 0.001); exercise time was significantly less at 60% ( P  = 0.013) and 80% ( P  = 0.005) rh than recorded at 24% rh. There were no differences in core temperature ( P  = 0.480) and heart rate ( P  = 0.097) between trials. Core temperature at exhaustion was 39.0 ± 0.3°C at 24, 40, and 60% rh and 39.1 ± 0.3°C at 80% rh ( P  = 0.159). Mean skin temperature at the point of exhaustion was higher at 80% rh than at 24% rh ( P  < 0.001). Total sweat loss was similar between trials ( P  = 0.345), but sweating rate was higher at 60 and 80% rh than at 24% rh ( P  < 0.001). The results suggest that exercise capacity at moderate intensity in a warm environment is progressively impaired as the relative humidity increases.
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1Biological and medical sciences
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4Body Temperature - physiology
5Body Temperature Regulation - physiology
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18Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine
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21Physical Endurance - physiology
22Regional Blood Flow - physiology
23Rest - physiology
24Skin
25Skin Temperature - physiology
26Sports Medicine
27Sweating - physiology
28Vertebrates: body movement. Posture. Locomotion. Flight. Swimming. Physical exercise. Rest. Sports
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abstractThis study examined the influence of relative humidity on endurance exercise performance in a warm environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70% maximum oxygen uptake until volitional exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30.2 ± 0.2°C. Volunteers were tested under four relative humidity (rh) conditions: 24, 40, 60 and 80%. Core and weighted mean skin temperature, heart rate, skin blood flow, and cutaneous vascular conductance were recorded at rest and at regular intervals during exercise. Mean ± SD time to exhaustion was 68 ± 19, 60 ± 17, 54 ± 17, and 46 ± 14 min at 24, 40, 60, and 80% rh, respectively ( P  < 0.001); exercise time was significantly less at 60% ( P  = 0.013) and 80% ( P  = 0.005) rh than recorded at 24% rh. There were no differences in core temperature ( P  = 0.480) and heart rate ( P  = 0.097) between trials. Core temperature at exhaustion was 39.0 ± 0.3°C at 24, 40, and 60% rh and 39.1 ± 0.3°C at 80% rh ( P  = 0.159). Mean skin temperature at the point of exhaustion was higher at 80% rh than at 24% rh ( P  < 0.001). Total sweat loss was similar between trials ( P  = 0.345), but sweating rate was higher at 60 and 80% rh than at 24% rh ( P  < 0.001). The results suggest that exercise capacity at moderate intensity in a warm environment is progressively impaired as the relative humidity increases.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer-Verlag
pmid22012542
doi10.1007/s00421-011-2206-7