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Genetic variation and association mapping of waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum

Main conclusion Forty-five molecular markers were detected significantly associated with chrysanthemum’ waterlogging tolerance, and four favorable parental lines were identified as potential donors for improving waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum. The productivity of chrysanthemum is downgraded... Full description

Journal Title: Planta 2016-08-13, Vol.244 (6), p.1241-1252
Main Author: Su, Jiangshuo
Other Authors: Zhang, Fei , Li, Pirui , Guan, Zhiyong , Fang, Weimin , Chen, Fadi
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
ID: ISSN: 0032-0935
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27522648
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1837300689
title: Genetic variation and association mapping of waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum
format: Article
creator:
  • Su, Jiangshuo
  • Zhang, Fei
  • Li, Pirui
  • Guan, Zhiyong
  • Fang, Weimin
  • Chen, Fadi
subjects:
  • Agriculture
  • Analysis
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Chrysanthemum - genetics
  • Chrysanthemum - physiology
  • Ecology
  • Forestry
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic Markers - genetics
  • Genetic Markers - physiology
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic Variation - genetics
  • Genetic Variation - physiology
  • Genome-Wide Association Study
  • Life Sciences
  • Original Article
  • Plant Sciences
  • Stress, Physiological - genetics
  • Stress, Physiological - physiology
  • Water
ispartof: Planta, 2016-08-13, Vol.244 (6), p.1241-1252
description: Main conclusion Forty-five molecular markers were detected significantly associated with chrysanthemum’ waterlogging tolerance, and four favorable parental lines were identified as potential donors for improving waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum. The productivity of chrysanthemum is downgraded by waterlogging soils, which has driven a search for germplasm showing an enhanced level of waterlogging tolerance (WT). As yet little is known regarding the mode of inheritance of WT in chrysanthemum. The study set out to characterize the extent of genetic variation for WT represented in a collection of one hundred chrysanthemum accessions by testing them under both greenhouse and field conditions. A membership function value of waterlogging (MFVW), which integrated a wilting index, a chlorosis score and the proportion of dead leaf in waterlogged plants, was used as a measure of WT. The variation for MFVW among plants grown in the greenhouse (two experiments) was generally higher than that generated in field-grown (one experiment) plants. The MFVW broad sense heritability was 0.82, and the phenotypic coefficient of variation (31.8 %) was larger than the genetic one (28.8 %). Association mapping (AM) identified 45 markers related to WT: 25 by applying the general linear model (GLM) + principal component (PC) model, 16 by applying the mixed linear model (MLM), 31 by applying the MLM + Q matrix model and 12 by applying the MLM + PC model. Of the associated markers, eight and two were predictive in two and three experiments within all models, respectively; the proportion of the phenotypic variance explained by the eight associations ranged from 6.3 to 16.4 %. On the basis of their harboring all four of the leading markers E2M16-2, SSR150-6, E19M16-1 and E10M10-12, the varieties ‘Nannong Xuefeng’, ‘Qx097’, ‘Nannong Xunzhang’ and ‘Finch’ were identified as potential donors for future improvement of WT in chrysanthemum.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-0935
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-0935
  • 1432-2048
url: Link


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titleGenetic variation and association mapping of waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum
creatorSu, Jiangshuo ; Zhang, Fei ; Li, Pirui ; Guan, Zhiyong ; Fang, Weimin ; Chen, Fadi
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descriptionMain conclusion Forty-five molecular markers were detected significantly associated with chrysanthemum’ waterlogging tolerance, and four favorable parental lines were identified as potential donors for improving waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum. The productivity of chrysanthemum is downgraded by waterlogging soils, which has driven a search for germplasm showing an enhanced level of waterlogging tolerance (WT). As yet little is known regarding the mode of inheritance of WT in chrysanthemum. The study set out to characterize the extent of genetic variation for WT represented in a collection of one hundred chrysanthemum accessions by testing them under both greenhouse and field conditions. A membership function value of waterlogging (MFVW), which integrated a wilting index, a chlorosis score and the proportion of dead leaf in waterlogged plants, was used as a measure of WT. The variation for MFVW among plants grown in the greenhouse (two experiments) was generally higher than that generated in field-grown (one experiment) plants. The MFVW broad sense heritability was 0.82, and the phenotypic coefficient of variation (31.8 %) was larger than the genetic one (28.8 %). Association mapping (AM) identified 45 markers related to WT: 25 by applying the general linear model (GLM) + principal component (PC) model, 16 by applying the mixed linear model (MLM), 31 by applying the MLM + Q matrix model and 12 by applying the MLM + PC model. Of the associated markers, eight and two were predictive in two and three experiments within all models, respectively; the proportion of the phenotypic variance explained by the eight associations ranged from 6.3 to 16.4 %. On the basis of their harboring all four of the leading markers E2M16-2, SSR150-6, E19M16-1 and E10M10-12, the varieties ‘Nannong Xuefeng’, ‘Qx097’, ‘Nannong Xunzhang’ and ‘Finch’ were identified as potential donors for future improvement of WT in chrysanthemum.
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subjectAgriculture ; Analysis ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Chrysanthemum ; Chrysanthemum - genetics ; Chrysanthemum - physiology ; Ecology ; Forestry ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic Markers - genetics ; Genetic Markers - physiology ; Genetic research ; Genetic Variation - genetics ; Genetic Variation - physiology ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Life Sciences ; Original Article ; Plant Sciences ; Stress, Physiological - genetics ; Stress, Physiological - physiology ; Water
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descriptionMain conclusion Forty-five molecular markers were detected significantly associated with chrysanthemum’ waterlogging tolerance, and four favorable parental lines were identified as potential donors for improving waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum. The productivity of chrysanthemum is downgraded by waterlogging soils, which has driven a search for germplasm showing an enhanced level of waterlogging tolerance (WT). As yet little is known regarding the mode of inheritance of WT in chrysanthemum. The study set out to characterize the extent of genetic variation for WT represented in a collection of one hundred chrysanthemum accessions by testing them under both greenhouse and field conditions. A membership function value of waterlogging (MFVW), which integrated a wilting index, a chlorosis score and the proportion of dead leaf in waterlogged plants, was used as a measure of WT. The variation for MFVW among plants grown in the greenhouse (two experiments) was generally higher than that generated in field-grown (one experiment) plants. The MFVW broad sense heritability was 0.82, and the phenotypic coefficient of variation (31.8 %) was larger than the genetic one (28.8 %). Association mapping (AM) identified 45 markers related to WT: 25 by applying the general linear model (GLM) + principal component (PC) model, 16 by applying the mixed linear model (MLM), 31 by applying the MLM + Q matrix model and 12 by applying the MLM + PC model. Of the associated markers, eight and two were predictive in two and three experiments within all models, respectively; the proportion of the phenotypic variance explained by the eight associations ranged from 6.3 to 16.4 %. On the basis of their harboring all four of the leading markers E2M16-2, SSR150-6, E19M16-1 and E10M10-12, the varieties ‘Nannong Xuefeng’, ‘Qx097’, ‘Nannong Xunzhang’ and ‘Finch’ were identified as potential donors for future improvement of WT in chrysanthemum.
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abstractMain conclusion Forty-five molecular markers were detected significantly associated with chrysanthemum’ waterlogging tolerance, and four favorable parental lines were identified as potential donors for improving waterlogging tolerance in chrysanthemum. The productivity of chrysanthemum is downgraded by waterlogging soils, which has driven a search for germplasm showing an enhanced level of waterlogging tolerance (WT). As yet little is known regarding the mode of inheritance of WT in chrysanthemum. The study set out to characterize the extent of genetic variation for WT represented in a collection of one hundred chrysanthemum accessions by testing them under both greenhouse and field conditions. A membership function value of waterlogging (MFVW), which integrated a wilting index, a chlorosis score and the proportion of dead leaf in waterlogged plants, was used as a measure of WT. The variation for MFVW among plants grown in the greenhouse (two experiments) was generally higher than that generated in field-grown (one experiment) plants. The MFVW broad sense heritability was 0.82, and the phenotypic coefficient of variation (31.8 %) was larger than the genetic one (28.8 %). Association mapping (AM) identified 45 markers related to WT: 25 by applying the general linear model (GLM) + principal component (PC) model, 16 by applying the mixed linear model (MLM), 31 by applying the MLM + Q matrix model and 12 by applying the MLM + PC model. Of the associated markers, eight and two were predictive in two and three experiments within all models, respectively; the proportion of the phenotypic variance explained by the eight associations ranged from 6.3 to 16.4 %. On the basis of their harboring all four of the leading markers E2M16-2, SSR150-6, E19M16-1 and E10M10-12, the varieties ‘Nannong Xuefeng’, ‘Qx097’, ‘Nannong Xunzhang’ and ‘Finch’ were identified as potential donors for future improvement of WT in chrysanthemum.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
pmid27522648
doi10.1007/s00425-016-2583-6