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Bilateral deficit in maximal force production

The bilateral deficit phenomenon, characterized by a reduction in the amount of force from a single limb during maximal bilateral actions, has been shown in various movement tasks, contraction types and different populations. However, bilateral deficit appears to be an inconsistent phenomenon, with... Full description

Journal Title: European Journal of Applied Physiology 2016-08-31, Vol.116 (11-12), p.2057-2084
Main Author: Škarabot, Jakob
Other Authors: Cronin, Neil , Strojnik, Vojko , Avela, Janne
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
ID: ISSN: 1439-6319
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27582260
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1846423457
title: Bilateral deficit in maximal force production
format: Article
creator:
  • Škarabot, Jakob
  • Cronin, Neil
  • Strojnik, Vojko
  • Avela, Janne
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Biomedicine
  • Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
  • Evidence-Based Medicine
  • Extremities - physiology
  • Functional Laterality - physiology
  • Human Physiology
  • Humans
  • Invited Review
  • Models, Neurological
  • Motor Cortex - physiology
  • Muscle Contraction - physiology
  • Muscle Strength - physiology
  • Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
  • Neural Inhibition - physiology
  • Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine
  • Sports Medicine
ispartof: European Journal of Applied Physiology, 2016-08-31, Vol.116 (11-12), p.2057-2084
description: The bilateral deficit phenomenon, characterized by a reduction in the amount of force from a single limb during maximal bilateral actions, has been shown in various movement tasks, contraction types and different populations. However, bilateral deficit appears to be an inconsistent phenomenon, with high variability in magnitude and existence, and seems to be plastic, as bilateral facilitation has also been shown to occur. Furthermore, many mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have been proposed over the years, but still remain largely unknown. The purpose of this review was to clarify and critically discuss some of the important issues relevant to bilateral deficit. The main findings of this review were: (1) bilateral deficit does not seem to be contraction-type dependent; however, it is more consistent in dynamic compared to isometric contractions; (2) postural stabilization requirements and/or ability to use counterbalances during unilateral actions seem to influence the expression of bilateral deficit to a great extent; strong evidence has been provided for higher-order neural inhibition as a possible mechanism, but requires further exploration using a lower limb model; biomechanical mechanisms, such as differences in shortening velocity between contraction modes and displacement of the force–velocity curve, seem to underlie bilateral deficit in ballistic and explosive contractions; (3) task familiarity has a large influence on bilateral deficit and thus adequate testing specificity is warranted in training/cross-sectional experiments; (4) the literature investigating the relationship between bilateral deficit and athletic performance and injury remains scarce; hence, further research in this area is required.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1439-6319
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1439-6319
  • 1439-6327
url: Link


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descriptionThe bilateral deficit phenomenon, characterized by a reduction in the amount of force from a single limb during maximal bilateral actions, has been shown in various movement tasks, contraction types and different populations. However, bilateral deficit appears to be an inconsistent phenomenon, with high variability in magnitude and existence, and seems to be plastic, as bilateral facilitation has also been shown to occur. Furthermore, many mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have been proposed over the years, but still remain largely unknown. The purpose of this review was to clarify and critically discuss some of the important issues relevant to bilateral deficit. The main findings of this review were: (1) bilateral deficit does not seem to be contraction-type dependent; however, it is more consistent in dynamic compared to isometric contractions; (2) postural stabilization requirements and/or ability to use counterbalances during unilateral actions seem to influence the expression of bilateral deficit to a great extent; strong evidence has been provided for higher-order neural inhibition as a possible mechanism, but requires further exploration using a lower limb model; biomechanical mechanisms, such as differences in shortening velocity between contraction modes and displacement of the force–velocity curve, seem to underlie bilateral deficit in ballistic and explosive contractions; (3) task familiarity has a large influence on bilateral deficit and thus adequate testing specificity is warranted in training/cross-sectional experiments; (4) the literature investigating the relationship between bilateral deficit and athletic performance and injury remains scarce; hence, further research in this area is required.
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subjectAnimals ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Biomedicine ; Dominance, Cerebral - physiology ; Evidence-Based Medicine ; Extremities - physiology ; Functional Laterality - physiology ; Human Physiology ; Humans ; Invited Review ; Models, Neurological ; Motor Cortex - physiology ; Muscle Contraction - physiology ; Muscle Strength - physiology ; Muscle, Skeletal - physiology ; Neural Inhibition - physiology ; Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine ; Sports Medicine
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descriptionThe bilateral deficit phenomenon, characterized by a reduction in the amount of force from a single limb during maximal bilateral actions, has been shown in various movement tasks, contraction types and different populations. However, bilateral deficit appears to be an inconsistent phenomenon, with high variability in magnitude and existence, and seems to be plastic, as bilateral facilitation has also been shown to occur. Furthermore, many mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have been proposed over the years, but still remain largely unknown. The purpose of this review was to clarify and critically discuss some of the important issues relevant to bilateral deficit. The main findings of this review were: (1) bilateral deficit does not seem to be contraction-type dependent; however, it is more consistent in dynamic compared to isometric contractions; (2) postural stabilization requirements and/or ability to use counterbalances during unilateral actions seem to influence the expression of bilateral deficit to a great extent; strong evidence has been provided for higher-order neural inhibition as a possible mechanism, but requires further exploration using a lower limb model; biomechanical mechanisms, such as differences in shortening velocity between contraction modes and displacement of the force–velocity curve, seem to underlie bilateral deficit in ballistic and explosive contractions; (3) task familiarity has a large influence on bilateral deficit and thus adequate testing specificity is warranted in training/cross-sectional experiments; (4) the literature investigating the relationship between bilateral deficit and athletic performance and injury remains scarce; hence, further research in this area is required.
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abstractThe bilateral deficit phenomenon, characterized by a reduction in the amount of force from a single limb during maximal bilateral actions, has been shown in various movement tasks, contraction types and different populations. However, bilateral deficit appears to be an inconsistent phenomenon, with high variability in magnitude and existence, and seems to be plastic, as bilateral facilitation has also been shown to occur. Furthermore, many mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have been proposed over the years, but still remain largely unknown. The purpose of this review was to clarify and critically discuss some of the important issues relevant to bilateral deficit. The main findings of this review were: (1) bilateral deficit does not seem to be contraction-type dependent; however, it is more consistent in dynamic compared to isometric contractions; (2) postural stabilization requirements and/or ability to use counterbalances during unilateral actions seem to influence the expression of bilateral deficit to a great extent; strong evidence has been provided for higher-order neural inhibition as a possible mechanism, but requires further exploration using a lower limb model; biomechanical mechanisms, such as differences in shortening velocity between contraction modes and displacement of the force–velocity curve, seem to underlie bilateral deficit in ballistic and explosive contractions; (3) task familiarity has a large influence on bilateral deficit and thus adequate testing specificity is warranted in training/cross-sectional experiments; (4) the literature investigating the relationship between bilateral deficit and athletic performance and injury remains scarce; hence, further research in this area is required.
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doi10.1007/s00421-016-3458-z
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