schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Depression among Older Adults: a 20-Year Update on Five Common Myths and Misconceptions

Highlights • Compared to younger adults, is MDD in older adults symptomatically different, more common, difficult to treat, chronic, and more often caused by psychological factors? • MDD is less common in late-life, but has a more chronic course than younger adults. Older adults with subclinical dep... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry 2017, Vol.26 (1), p.107-122
Main Author: Haigh, Emily A.P., PhD
Other Authors: Bogucki, Olivia E., MA , Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD , Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 1064-7481
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28735658
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1923106481
title: Depression among Older Adults: a 20-Year Update on Five Common Myths and Misconceptions
format: Article
creator:
  • Haigh, Emily A.P., PhD
  • Bogucki, Olivia E., MA
  • Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD
  • Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
subjects:
  • depression
  • depressive disorders
  • geriatric
  • Geriatrics
  • Internal Medicine
  • late-life
  • Mental depression
  • Older adults
  • Older people
ispartof: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, 2017, Vol.26 (1), p.107-122
description: Highlights • Compared to younger adults, is MDD in older adults symptomatically different, more common, difficult to treat, chronic, and more often caused by psychological factors? • MDD is less common in late-life, but has a more chronic course than younger adults. Older adults with subclinical depression report functional impairment similar to MDD. • Depression in late-life may be symptomatically different but more research is needed to separate impact of medical comorbidity • Older adults respond to treatment as well as younger adults; antidepressants may be less efficacious in late-life, while older age is a favorable predictor of ECT response • While older adults may benefit from enhanced ability to regulate emotions, research suggests that several age-related biological processes contribute to MDD in late-life
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1064-7481
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1064-7481
  • 1545-7214
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.748887
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidproquest_cross
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_1923106481
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordid2073449966
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1487t-dccda258fd9e172269293ec0c0846011c0bd6fa63af28c70e6b269376f8d0b7b3
addsrcrecordideNp9ksFu1DAURSMEoqXwAyyQJTZsEp7txHYQqlQNLSC16gIqxMpy7JfikEmCnVSav6-jKV3Moit7ce7V9ZGz7C2FggIVH7uiM7dTwYDKAkQBlD7LjmlVVrlktHye7iDKXJaKHmWvYuwAQNSifJkdMSV5JSp1nP36glPAGP04ELMdh1ty3TsM5Mwt_Rw_EUMY5L_RBHIzOTMjSdyFv0OyGbcJJ1e7-U8kZnDkykc7DhanOXXF19mL1vQR3zycJ9nNxfnPzbf88vrr983ZZU5LJefcWesMq1TraqSSMVGzmqMFC6oU6UEWGidaI7hpmbISUDSJ4VK0ykEjG36Sfdj3TmH8t2Cc9TbtwL43A45L1LRmfNWgaELfH6DduIQhrdMMJC_LuhYiUWxP2TDGGLDVU_BbE3aagl61606v2vWqXYPQaWUKvXuoXpotusfIf88JUAet1s9mNTUH4_unuz_vo5g03nkMOlqPSbTzAe2s3eifjp8exG3vB29N_xd3GB8VUB2ZBv1jlbV-GSo58Epyfg_M1bkJ
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid2073449966
display
typearticle
titleDepression among Older Adults: a 20-Year Update on Five Common Myths and Misconceptions
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorHaigh, Emily A.P., PhD ; Bogucki, Olivia E., MA ; Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD ; Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
creatorcontribHaigh, Emily A.P., PhD ; Bogucki, Olivia E., MA ; Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD ; Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
descriptionHighlights • Compared to younger adults, is MDD in older adults symptomatically different, more common, difficult to treat, chronic, and more often caused by psychological factors? • MDD is less common in late-life, but has a more chronic course than younger adults. Older adults with subclinical depression report functional impairment similar to MDD. • Depression in late-life may be symptomatically different but more research is needed to separate impact of medical comorbidity • Older adults respond to treatment as well as younger adults; antidepressants may be less efficacious in late-life, while older age is a favorable predictor of ECT response • While older adults may benefit from enhanced ability to regulate emotions, research suggests that several age-related biological processes contribute to MDD in late-life
identifier
0ISSN: 1064-7481
1EISSN: 1545-7214
2DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.06.011
3PMID: 28735658
languageeng
publisherEngland: Elsevier Inc
subjectdepression ; depressive disorders ; geriatric ; Geriatrics ; Internal Medicine ; late-life ; Mental depression ; Older adults ; Older people
ispartofThe American journal of geriatric psychiatry, 2017, Vol.26 (1), p.107-122
rights
02017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
1Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2Copyright Elsevier Limited Jan 2018
lds50peer_reviewed
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1487t-dccda258fd9e172269293ec0c0846011c0bd6fa63af28c70e6b269376f8d0b7b3
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28735658$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Haigh, Emily A.P., PhD
1Bogucki, Olivia E., MA
2Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD
3Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
title
0Depression among Older Adults: a 20-Year Update on Five Common Myths and Misconceptions
1The American journal of geriatric psychiatry
addtitleAm J Geriatr Psychiatry
descriptionHighlights • Compared to younger adults, is MDD in older adults symptomatically different, more common, difficult to treat, chronic, and more often caused by psychological factors? • MDD is less common in late-life, but has a more chronic course than younger adults. Older adults with subclinical depression report functional impairment similar to MDD. • Depression in late-life may be symptomatically different but more research is needed to separate impact of medical comorbidity • Older adults respond to treatment as well as younger adults; antidepressants may be less efficacious in late-life, while older age is a favorable predictor of ECT response • While older adults may benefit from enhanced ability to regulate emotions, research suggests that several age-related biological processes contribute to MDD in late-life
subject
0depression
1depressive disorders
2geriatric
3Geriatrics
4Internal Medicine
5late-life
6Mental depression
7Older adults
8Older people
issn
01064-7481
11545-7214
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2017
recordtypearticle
recordideNp9ksFu1DAURSMEoqXwAyyQJTZsEp7txHYQqlQNLSC16gIqxMpy7JfikEmCnVSav6-jKV3Moit7ce7V9ZGz7C2FggIVH7uiM7dTwYDKAkQBlD7LjmlVVrlktHye7iDKXJaKHmWvYuwAQNSifJkdMSV5JSp1nP36glPAGP04ELMdh1ty3TsM5Mwt_Rw_EUMY5L_RBHIzOTMjSdyFv0OyGbcJJ1e7-U8kZnDkykc7DhanOXXF19mL1vQR3zycJ9nNxfnPzbf88vrr983ZZU5LJefcWesMq1TraqSSMVGzmqMFC6oU6UEWGidaI7hpmbISUDSJ4VK0ykEjG36Sfdj3TmH8t2Cc9TbtwL43A45L1LRmfNWgaELfH6DduIQhrdMMJC_LuhYiUWxP2TDGGLDVU_BbE3aagl61606v2vWqXYPQaWUKvXuoXpotusfIf88JUAet1s9mNTUH4_unuz_vo5g03nkMOlqPSbTzAe2s3eifjp8exG3vB29N_xd3GB8VUB2ZBv1jlbV-GSo58Epyfg_M1bkJ
startdate2017
enddate2017
creator
0Haigh, Emily A.P., PhD
1Bogucki, Olivia E., MA
2Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD
3Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
general
0Elsevier Inc
1Elsevier Limited
scope
0NPM
1AAYXX
2CITATION
34T-
4K9.
57X8
sort
creationdate2017
titleDepression among Older Adults: a 20-Year Update on Five Common Myths and Misconceptions
authorHaigh, Emily A.P., PhD ; Bogucki, Olivia E., MA ; Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD ; Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1487t-dccda258fd9e172269293ec0c0846011c0bd6fa63af28c70e6b269376f8d0b7b3
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2017
topic
0depression
1depressive disorders
2geriatric
3Geriatrics
4Internal Medicine
5late-life
6Mental depression
7Older adults
8Older people
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Haigh, Emily A.P., PhD
1Bogucki, Olivia E., MA
2Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD
3Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
collection
0PubMed
1CrossRef
2Docstoc
3ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
4MEDLINE - Academic
jtitleThe American journal of geriatric psychiatry
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Haigh, Emily A.P., PhD
1Bogucki, Olivia E., MA
2Sigmon, Sandra T., PhD
3Blazer, Dan G., MD, PhD
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleDepression among Older Adults: a 20-Year Update on Five Common Myths and Misconceptions
jtitleThe American journal of geriatric psychiatry
addtitleAm J Geriatr Psychiatry
date2017
risdate2017
volume26
issue1
spage107
epage122
pages107-122
issn1064-7481
eissn1545-7214
abstractHighlights • Compared to younger adults, is MDD in older adults symptomatically different, more common, difficult to treat, chronic, and more often caused by psychological factors? • MDD is less common in late-life, but has a more chronic course than younger adults. Older adults with subclinical depression report functional impairment similar to MDD. • Depression in late-life may be symptomatically different but more research is needed to separate impact of medical comorbidity • Older adults respond to treatment as well as younger adults; antidepressants may be less efficacious in late-life, while older age is a favorable predictor of ECT response • While older adults may benefit from enhanced ability to regulate emotions, research suggests that several age-related biological processes contribute to MDD in late-life
copEngland
pubElsevier Inc
pmid28735658
doi10.1016/j.jagp.2017.06.011