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Improving the Measurement of Fertility Regulation Practices: Findings from Qualitative Research in Ghana

CONTEXT: According to Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data, highly educated urban women in some West African countries simultaneously have low rates of both contraceptive use and fertility—suggesting that the DHS may not be capturing a complete picture of women's contraceptive practices. METHODS... Full description

Journal Title: International family planning perspectives 2017-09-01, Vol.43 (3), p.111-119
Main Author: Marston, Cicely
Other Authors: Renedo, Alicia , Nyaaba, Gertrude Nsorma , Machiyama, Kazuyo , Tapsoba, Placide , Cleland, John
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Guttmacher Institute
ID: ISSN: 1944-0391
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29553472
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_2015409627
title: Improving the Measurement of Fertility Regulation Practices: Findings from Qualitative Research in Ghana
format: Article
creator:
  • Marston, Cicely
  • Renedo, Alicia
  • Nyaaba, Gertrude Nsorma
  • Machiyama, Kazuyo
  • Tapsoba, Placide
  • Cleland, John
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Behavior
  • Birth control
  • Calendar rhythm method
  • Condoms
  • Contraception
  • Contraception - statistics & numerical data
  • Contraception Behavior - statistics & numerical data
  • Contraceptives
  • Distribution
  • Family planning
  • Family Planning Services - statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Female fertility
  • Fertility
  • Focus Groups
  • Ghana
  • Health aspects
  • Health Education - organization & administration
  • Health Status
  • Health surveys
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Measurement
  • Medical research
  • Menstrual cycle
  • Menstruation
  • Methods
  • Middle Aged
  • Mosaic
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Polls & surveys
  • Pregnancy
  • Qualitative research
  • Reproductive health
  • Reproductive Health Services - statistics & numerical data
  • Women
  • Womens health
  • Young Adult
ispartof: International family planning perspectives, 2017-09-01, Vol.43 (3), p.111-119
description: CONTEXT: According to Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data, highly educated urban women in some West African countries simultaneously have low rates of both contraceptive use and fertility—suggesting that the DHS may not be capturing a complete picture of women's contraceptive practices. METHODS: Individual in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 48 women aged 18–49 in Accra, Ghana, who had at least a secondary education to explore their reproductive lives and relationships, and their views on and use of fertility regulation strategies. Data were analyzed using iterative thematic techniques. RESULTS: Women commonly reported using combinations of contraceptive methods, including “counting days” (using a calendar and the date of one's last menstrual period to estimate “unsafe” days—those on which the risk of conception is high), as well as withdrawal, condoms and frequent use of emergency contraceptive pills. Women described practicing “periodic contraception”: for example, counting days to determine unsafe days and practicing contraception ad hoc on such days. Method use combinations varied from cycle to cycle—forming a “mosaic” of method use combinations over time. CONCLUSIONS: The fertility control strategies commonly reported by the study respondents—periodic contraception, and frequent use of traditional methods and emergency contraceptive pills—are likely not adequately captured in general surveys such as the DHS. Such surveys are also not well suited to measuring combinations of methods and mosaics of method combinations. New ways of capturing women's fertility regulation practices should be considered, including additional survey items, new question modules and specialist studies.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1944-0391
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1944-0391
  • 1944-0405
  • 1943-4154
url: Link


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descriptionCONTEXT: According to Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data, highly educated urban women in some West African countries simultaneously have low rates of both contraceptive use and fertility—suggesting that the DHS may not be capturing a complete picture of women's contraceptive practices. METHODS: Individual in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 48 women aged 18–49 in Accra, Ghana, who had at least a secondary education to explore their reproductive lives and relationships, and their views on and use of fertility regulation strategies. Data were analyzed using iterative thematic techniques. RESULTS: Women commonly reported using combinations of contraceptive methods, including “counting days” (using a calendar and the date of one's last menstrual period to estimate “unsafe” days—those on which the risk of conception is high), as well as withdrawal, condoms and frequent use of emergency contraceptive pills. Women described practicing “periodic contraception”: for example, counting days to determine unsafe days and practicing contraception ad hoc on such days. Method use combinations varied from cycle to cycle—forming a “mosaic” of method use combinations over time. CONCLUSIONS: The fertility control strategies commonly reported by the study respondents—periodic contraception, and frequent use of traditional methods and emergency contraceptive pills—are likely not adequately captured in general surveys such as the DHS. Such surveys are also not well suited to measuring combinations of methods and mosaics of method combinations. New ways of capturing women's fertility regulation practices should be considered, including additional survey items, new question modules and specialist studies.
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addtitleInt Perspect Sex Reprod Health
date2017-09-01
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abstractCONTEXT: According to Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data, highly educated urban women in some West African countries simultaneously have low rates of both contraceptive use and fertility—suggesting that the DHS may not be capturing a complete picture of women's contraceptive practices. METHODS: Individual in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 48 women aged 18–49 in Accra, Ghana, who had at least a secondary education to explore their reproductive lives and relationships, and their views on and use of fertility regulation strategies. Data were analyzed using iterative thematic techniques. RESULTS: Women commonly reported using combinations of contraceptive methods, including “counting days” (using a calendar and the date of one's last menstrual period to estimate “unsafe” days—those on which the risk of conception is high), as well as withdrawal, condoms and frequent use of emergency contraceptive pills. Women described practicing “periodic contraception”: for example, counting days to determine unsafe days and practicing contraception ad hoc on such days. Method use combinations varied from cycle to cycle—forming a “mosaic” of method use combinations over time. CONCLUSIONS: The fertility control strategies commonly reported by the study respondents—periodic contraception, and frequent use of traditional methods and emergency contraceptive pills—are likely not adequately captured in general surveys such as the DHS. Such surveys are also not well suited to measuring combinations of methods and mosaics of method combinations. New ways of capturing women's fertility regulation practices should be considered, including additional survey items, new question modules and specialist studies.
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