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Earless Frogs in the Andes

Terrestrial-breeding frogs use a specialized reproductive mode called direct development in which embryos hatch directly into froglets (i.e., there are no free-living tadpoles)-a strategy that allows the group to exploit a wide variety of habitats, provided those habitats contain sufficient moisture... Full description

Journal Title: Natural history 2018-05-01, Vol.126 (5), p.12-15
Main Author: von May, Rudolf
Other Authors: Lehr, Edgar , Rabosky, Daniel L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: New York: Natural History Magazine, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0028-0712
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_2025297641
title: Earless Frogs in the Andes
format: Article
creator:
  • von May, Rudolf
  • Lehr, Edgar
  • Rabosky, Daniel L
subjects:
  • Biodiversity
  • Evolution & development
  • Field study
  • Frogs
  • Geography
  • Hypotheses
  • Morphology
  • Mutation
  • Phrynopus
  • Zoology
ispartof: Natural history, 2018-05-01, Vol.126 (5), p.12-15
description: Terrestrial-breeding frogs use a specialized reproductive mode called direct development in which embryos hatch directly into froglets (i.e., there are no free-living tadpoles)-a strategy that allows the group to exploit a wide variety of habitats, provided those habitats contain sufficient moisture.Specifically, we detected a significant pattern of increasing body size with increasing elevation; species at higher elevations tend to develop shorter limbs, shorter head, and shorter snout than species living in the montane forests at lower elevations.[...]a test could be performed by examining the anatomy and development of the vomeronasal organ across a range of frog species; this organ forms the principal chemosensory apparatus in many vertebrates.Briefly, the three main hypotheses could be summarized as follows: neutral mutation-if a trait doesn't provide a benefit, it may accumulate mutations and drift from a population; direct selection-if the loss of a trait is advantageous for the organism, it will be selected against; and pleiotropy (also called indirect selection)-if the morphological change in a trait occurs at the expense of another, unrelated trait.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0028-0712
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0028-0712
url: Link


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descriptionTerrestrial-breeding frogs use a specialized reproductive mode called direct development in which embryos hatch directly into froglets (i.e., there are no free-living tadpoles)-a strategy that allows the group to exploit a wide variety of habitats, provided those habitats contain sufficient moisture.Specifically, we detected a significant pattern of increasing body size with increasing elevation; species at higher elevations tend to develop shorter limbs, shorter head, and shorter snout than species living in the montane forests at lower elevations.[...]a test could be performed by examining the anatomy and development of the vomeronasal organ across a range of frog species; this organ forms the principal chemosensory apparatus in many vertebrates.Briefly, the three main hypotheses could be summarized as follows: neutral mutation-if a trait doesn't provide a benefit, it may accumulate mutations and drift from a population; direct selection-if the loss of a trait is advantageous for the organism, it will be selected against; and pleiotropy (also called indirect selection)-if the morphological change in a trait occurs at the expense of another, unrelated trait.
identifierISSN: 0028-0712
languageeng
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subjectBiodiversity ; Evolution & development ; Field study ; Frogs ; Geography ; Hypotheses ; Morphology ; Mutation ; Phrynopus ; Zoology
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abstractTerrestrial-breeding frogs use a specialized reproductive mode called direct development in which embryos hatch directly into froglets (i.e., there are no free-living tadpoles)-a strategy that allows the group to exploit a wide variety of habitats, provided those habitats contain sufficient moisture.Specifically, we detected a significant pattern of increasing body size with increasing elevation; species at higher elevations tend to develop shorter limbs, shorter head, and shorter snout than species living in the montane forests at lower elevations.[...]a test could be performed by examining the anatomy and development of the vomeronasal organ across a range of frog species; this organ forms the principal chemosensory apparatus in many vertebrates.Briefly, the three main hypotheses could be summarized as follows: neutral mutation-if a trait doesn't provide a benefit, it may accumulate mutations and drift from a population; direct selection-if the loss of a trait is advantageous for the organism, it will be selected against; and pleiotropy (also called indirect selection)-if the morphological change in a trait occurs at the expense of another, unrelated trait.
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