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Limitations to the potential of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. plants that exude phytase when grown in soils with a range of organic P content

Growth and P-nutrition of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. which express a chimeric fungal phytase gene (ex::phyA) was compared to azygous and wild-type controls in a range of soils that differed in organic P content. Shoot and root growth by plant lines were measured and effects of reducing the... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2005-12-01, Vol.278 (1/2), p.263-274
Main Author: GEORGE, Timothy S
Other Authors: RICHARDSON, Alan E , SMITH, J. Barry , HADOBAS, Paul A , SIMPSON, Richard J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=17348883
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title: Limitations to the potential of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. plants that exude phytase when grown in soils with a range of organic P content
format: Article
creator:
  • GEORGE, Timothy S
  • RICHARDSON, Alan E
  • SMITH, J. Barry
  • HADOBAS, Paul A
  • SIMPSON, Richard J
subjects:
  • Acid soils
  • Adaptation to environment and cultivation conditions
  • Agricultural soils
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biotechnology
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Genetic engineering applications
  • Genetics and breeding of economic plants
  • Nutrition
  • Organic soils
  • Phosphorus
  • Plant breeding: fundamental aspects and methodology
  • Plant roots
  • Plants
  • Soil biochemistry
  • Soil microorganisms
  • Soil organic matter
  • Transgenic plants
  • Trifolium subterraneum
  • Varietal selection. Specialized plant breeding, plant breeding aims
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2005-12-01, Vol.278 (1/2), p.263-274
description: Growth and P-nutrition of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. which express a chimeric fungal phytase gene (ex::phyA) was compared to azygous and wild-type controls in a range of soils that differed in organic P content. Shoot and root growth by plant lines were measured and effects of reducing the influence of soil microorganisms were investigated by pasteurising the soils. Plants that expressed phyA did not have better P-nutrition than control plants after 56 days growth, except in a soil that contained a large concentration of both total organic P and organic P that was amenable to hydrolysis by a plant-derived phytase. Pasteurisation had little effect on the relative P-nutrition of the various plant lines in any of the soils. Roots of transgenic plants that expressed ex::phyA were shorter than controls up to 21 days growth in a number of soils, which resulted in an initial greater P accumulation efficiency. However, greater P accumulation efficiency was only maintained in the soil where significant growth and P nutrition responses were also observed. Availability of inositol phosphates in soil is a major factor that limits the effectiveness of expressing fungal phytase genes in plants as a means to improve P-nutrition. Reducing the influence of rhizosphere microorganisms appeared to have little effect on the P-nutrition of plant lines, but the longer root system produced by control plants may have initially provided them with greater access to soil P resources. This research highlights the inherent difficulty in improving the P-nutrition of plants by the manipulation of single traits in isolation, but does provide some evidence that such approaches can be successful under certain edaphic conditions.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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titleLimitations to the potential of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. plants that exude phytase when grown in soils with a range of organic P content
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descriptionGrowth and P-nutrition of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. which express a chimeric fungal phytase gene (ex::phyA) was compared to azygous and wild-type controls in a range of soils that differed in organic P content. Shoot and root growth by plant lines were measured and effects of reducing the influence of soil microorganisms were investigated by pasteurising the soils. Plants that expressed phyA did not have better P-nutrition than control plants after 56 days growth, except in a soil that contained a large concentration of both total organic P and organic P that was amenable to hydrolysis by a plant-derived phytase. Pasteurisation had little effect on the relative P-nutrition of the various plant lines in any of the soils. Roots of transgenic plants that expressed ex::phyA were shorter than controls up to 21 days growth in a number of soils, which resulted in an initial greater P accumulation efficiency. However, greater P accumulation efficiency was only maintained in the soil where significant growth and P nutrition responses were also observed. Availability of inositol phosphates in soil is a major factor that limits the effectiveness of expressing fungal phytase genes in plants as a means to improve P-nutrition. Reducing the influence of rhizosphere microorganisms appeared to have little effect on the P-nutrition of plant lines, but the longer root system produced by control plants may have initially provided them with greater access to soil P resources. This research highlights the inherent difficulty in improving the P-nutrition of plants by the manipulation of single traits in isolation, but does provide some evidence that such approaches can be successful under certain edaphic conditions.
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subjectAcid soils ; Adaptation to environment and cultivation conditions ; Agricultural soils ; Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biotechnology ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Genetic engineering applications ; Genetics and breeding of economic plants ; Nutrition ; Organic soils ; Phosphorus ; Plant breeding: fundamental aspects and methodology ; Plant roots ; Plants ; Soil biochemistry ; Soil microorganisms ; Soil organic matter ; Transgenic plants ; Trifolium subterraneum ; Varietal selection. Specialized plant breeding, plant breeding aims
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descriptionGrowth and P-nutrition of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. which express a chimeric fungal phytase gene (ex::phyA) was compared to azygous and wild-type controls in a range of soils that differed in organic P content. Shoot and root growth by plant lines were measured and effects of reducing the influence of soil microorganisms were investigated by pasteurising the soils. Plants that expressed phyA did not have better P-nutrition than control plants after 56 days growth, except in a soil that contained a large concentration of both total organic P and organic P that was amenable to hydrolysis by a plant-derived phytase. Pasteurisation had little effect on the relative P-nutrition of the various plant lines in any of the soils. Roots of transgenic plants that expressed ex::phyA were shorter than controls up to 21 days growth in a number of soils, which resulted in an initial greater P accumulation efficiency. However, greater P accumulation efficiency was only maintained in the soil where significant growth and P nutrition responses were also observed. Availability of inositol phosphates in soil is a major factor that limits the effectiveness of expressing fungal phytase genes in plants as a means to improve P-nutrition. Reducing the influence of rhizosphere microorganisms appeared to have little effect on the P-nutrition of plant lines, but the longer root system produced by control plants may have initially provided them with greater access to soil P resources. This research highlights the inherent difficulty in improving the P-nutrition of plants by the manipulation of single traits in isolation, but does provide some evidence that such approaches can be successful under certain edaphic conditions.
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titleLimitations to the potential of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. plants that exude phytase when grown in soils with a range of organic P content
authorGEORGE, Timothy S ; RICHARDSON, Alan E ; SMITH, J. Barry ; HADOBAS, Paul A ; SIMPSON, Richard J
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abstractGrowth and P-nutrition of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum L. which express a chimeric fungal phytase gene (ex::phyA) was compared to azygous and wild-type controls in a range of soils that differed in organic P content. Shoot and root growth by plant lines were measured and effects of reducing the influence of soil microorganisms were investigated by pasteurising the soils. Plants that expressed phyA did not have better P-nutrition than control plants after 56 days growth, except in a soil that contained a large concentration of both total organic P and organic P that was amenable to hydrolysis by a plant-derived phytase. Pasteurisation had little effect on the relative P-nutrition of the various plant lines in any of the soils. Roots of transgenic plants that expressed ex::phyA were shorter than controls up to 21 days growth in a number of soils, which resulted in an initial greater P accumulation efficiency. However, greater P accumulation efficiency was only maintained in the soil where significant growth and P nutrition responses were also observed. Availability of inositol phosphates in soil is a major factor that limits the effectiveness of expressing fungal phytase genes in plants as a means to improve P-nutrition. Reducing the influence of rhizosphere microorganisms appeared to have little effect on the P-nutrition of plant lines, but the longer root system produced by control plants may have initially provided them with greater access to soil P resources. This research highlights the inherent difficulty in improving the P-nutrition of plants by the manipulation of single traits in isolation, but does provide some evidence that such approaches can be successful under certain edaphic conditions.
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doi10.1007/s11104-005-8699-2