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Pharmacy Provision of Medication Abortion in Nepal: Pharmacy Owner and Worker Perspectives

CONTEXT: Medication abortion has the potential to transform the provision of safe abortion care in low- and middle-income countries, and can be provided with minimal clinical skills and equipment. In Nepal, first-trimester abortion using mifepristone and misoprostol is legally available at governmen... Full description

Journal Title: International family planning perspectives 2018-09-01, Vol.44 (3), p.81-89
Main Author: Samari, Goleen
Other Authors: Puri, Mahesh , Cohen, Rebecca , Blum, Maya , Rocca, Corinne H
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Guttmacher Institute
ID: ISSN: 1944-0391
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30698524
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_2179467907
title: Pharmacy Provision of Medication Abortion in Nepal: Pharmacy Owner and Worker Perspectives
format: Article
creator:
  • Samari, Goleen
  • Puri, Mahesh
  • Cohen, Rebecca
  • Blum, Maya
  • Rocca, Corinne H
subjects:
  • Abortion
  • Birth control
  • Clinical skills
  • Drug stores
  • Drugs
  • Equipment
  • Gestational age
  • Gynecology
  • Health care access
  • Health facilities
  • Medical referrals
  • Medications
  • Menstruation
  • Midwifery
  • Midwives
  • Mifepristone
  • Obstetrics
  • Owners
  • Pharmacies
  • Pharmacists
  • Pharmacy
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy complications
  • Privacy
  • Referrals
  • Reproductive health
  • Women
  • Womens health
  • Workers
ispartof: International family planning perspectives, 2018-09-01, Vol.44 (3), p.81-89
description: CONTEXT: Medication abortion has the potential to transform the provision of safe abortion care in low- and middle-income countries, and can be provided with minimal clinical skills and equipment. In Nepal, first-trimester abortion using mifepristone and misoprostol is legally available at government-certified health facilities, but little is known about pharmacy workers' perspectives regarding pharmacy-based provision. METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted in 2015 with 19 pharmacy owners and auxiliary nurse-midwives in two districts of Nepal to examine respondents' views on medication abortion and on potential legal provision of medication abortion from pharmacies. Two coders independently reviewed interview transcripts, and coded and analyzed them using a thematic approach. RESULTS: Participants were confident that they could provide safe medication abortion and felt that they filled an important niche by providing affordable, convenient and confidential services to women in their communities. They saw benefits of integrating pharmacies into legal abortion networks in Nepal, such as improved access to medication abortion and greater privacy. Participants also felt that the quality of the care they provided could be improved through ongoing training of pharmacy-based providers and formal incorporation of such providers into existing networks of abortion provision to streamline referrals. CONCLUSIONS: Integration of pharmacies into the legal abortion provision system could aid in regulation and training. Consideration of pharmacy workers' perspectives can help to ensure the sustainability and success of safe abortion programs.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1944-0391
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1944-0391
  • 1944-0405
  • 1943-4154
url: Link


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descriptionCONTEXT: Medication abortion has the potential to transform the provision of safe abortion care in low- and middle-income countries, and can be provided with minimal clinical skills and equipment. In Nepal, first-trimester abortion using mifepristone and misoprostol is legally available at government-certified health facilities, but little is known about pharmacy workers' perspectives regarding pharmacy-based provision. METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted in 2015 with 19 pharmacy owners and auxiliary nurse-midwives in two districts of Nepal to examine respondents' views on medication abortion and on potential legal provision of medication abortion from pharmacies. Two coders independently reviewed interview transcripts, and coded and analyzed them using a thematic approach. RESULTS: Participants were confident that they could provide safe medication abortion and felt that they filled an important niche by providing affordable, convenient and confidential services to women in their communities. They saw benefits of integrating pharmacies into legal abortion networks in Nepal, such as improved access to medication abortion and greater privacy. Participants also felt that the quality of the care they provided could be improved through ongoing training of pharmacy-based providers and formal incorporation of such providers into existing networks of abortion provision to streamline referrals. CONCLUSIONS: Integration of pharmacies into the legal abortion provision system could aid in regulation and training. Consideration of pharmacy workers' perspectives can help to ensure the sustainability and success of safe abortion programs.
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subjectAbortion ; Birth control ; Clinical skills ; Drug stores ; Drugs ; Equipment ; Gestational age ; Gynecology ; Health care access ; Health facilities ; Medical referrals ; Medications ; Menstruation ; Midwifery ; Midwives ; Mifepristone ; Obstetrics ; Owners ; Pharmacies ; Pharmacists ; Pharmacy ; Pregnancy ; Pregnancy complications ; Privacy ; Referrals ; Reproductive health ; Women ; Womens health ; Workers
ispartofInternational family planning perspectives, 2018-09-01, Vol.44 (3), p.81-89
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abstractCONTEXT: Medication abortion has the potential to transform the provision of safe abortion care in low- and middle-income countries, and can be provided with minimal clinical skills and equipment. In Nepal, first-trimester abortion using mifepristone and misoprostol is legally available at government-certified health facilities, but little is known about pharmacy workers' perspectives regarding pharmacy-based provision. METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted in 2015 with 19 pharmacy owners and auxiliary nurse-midwives in two districts of Nepal to examine respondents' views on medication abortion and on potential legal provision of medication abortion from pharmacies. Two coders independently reviewed interview transcripts, and coded and analyzed them using a thematic approach. RESULTS: Participants were confident that they could provide safe medication abortion and felt that they filled an important niche by providing affordable, convenient and confidential services to women in their communities. They saw benefits of integrating pharmacies into legal abortion networks in Nepal, such as improved access to medication abortion and greater privacy. Participants also felt that the quality of the care they provided could be improved through ongoing training of pharmacy-based providers and formal incorporation of such providers into existing networks of abortion provision to streamline referrals. CONCLUSIONS: Integration of pharmacies into the legal abortion provision system could aid in regulation and training. Consideration of pharmacy workers' perspectives can help to ensure the sustainability and success of safe abortion programs.
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