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Structure and dynamics of the ionosphere

The structure of the Venus ionosphere and the major processes occurring within it are summarized. The daytime ionosphere is created by solar EUV radiation incident on the thermosphere; it is in photochemical equilibrium near its peak at about 142 km, where O2(+) is the major ion, and near diffusive... Full description

Journal Title: Nature (London) 1982-03-04, Vol.296 (5852), p.19-19
Main Author: Nagy, A.F
Other Authors: Brace, L.H
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
ID: ISSN: 0028-0836
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title: Structure and dynamics of the ionosphere
format: Article
creator:
  • Nagy, A.F
  • Brace, L.H
ispartof: Nature (London), 1982-03-04, Vol.296 (5852), p.19-19
description: The structure of the Venus ionosphere and the major processes occurring within it are summarized. The daytime ionosphere is created by solar EUV radiation incident on the thermosphere; it is in photochemical equilibrium near its peak at about 142 km, where O2(+) is the major ion, and near diffusive equilibrium in its upper regions, where the major ion is O(+). The day-to-night plasma pressure gradient across the terminator drives a nightward ion flow which, together with electron precipitation, contributes to the formation of the nighttime ionosphere. Large-scale radial holes or plasma depletions extending downwards to nearly the ionization peak in the antisolar region are also observed which are associated with regions of strong radial magnetic fields. The ionopause is a highly dynamic and complex surface, extending from an average altitude of 290 km at the subsolar point to about 1000 km at the terminator and from 200 to over 3000 km on the nightside. A variety of solar wind interaction products are observed in the mantle, a transition region between the ionospheric plasma and the flowing shocked solar wind.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0028-0836
  • 1476-4687
url: Link


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descriptionThe structure of the Venus ionosphere and the major processes occurring within it are summarized. The daytime ionosphere is created by solar EUV radiation incident on the thermosphere; it is in photochemical equilibrium near its peak at about 142 km, where O2(+) is the major ion, and near diffusive equilibrium in its upper regions, where the major ion is O(+). The day-to-night plasma pressure gradient across the terminator drives a nightward ion flow which, together with electron precipitation, contributes to the formation of the nighttime ionosphere. Large-scale radial holes or plasma depletions extending downwards to nearly the ionization peak in the antisolar region are also observed which are associated with regions of strong radial magnetic fields. The ionopause is a highly dynamic and complex surface, extending from an average altitude of 290 km at the subsolar point to about 1000 km at the terminator and from 200 to over 3000 km on the nightside. A variety of solar wind interaction products are observed in the mantle, a transition region between the ionospheric plasma and the flowing shocked solar wind.
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descriptionThe structure of the Venus ionosphere and the major processes occurring within it are summarized. The daytime ionosphere is created by solar EUV radiation incident on the thermosphere; it is in photochemical equilibrium near its peak at about 142 km, where O2(+) is the major ion, and near diffusive equilibrium in its upper regions, where the major ion is O(+). The day-to-night plasma pressure gradient across the terminator drives a nightward ion flow which, together with electron precipitation, contributes to the formation of the nighttime ionosphere. Large-scale radial holes or plasma depletions extending downwards to nearly the ionization peak in the antisolar region are also observed which are associated with regions of strong radial magnetic fields. The ionopause is a highly dynamic and complex surface, extending from an average altitude of 290 km at the subsolar point to about 1000 km at the terminator and from 200 to over 3000 km on the nightside. A variety of solar wind interaction products are observed in the mantle, a transition region between the ionospheric plasma and the flowing shocked solar wind.
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abstractThe structure of the Venus ionosphere and the major processes occurring within it are summarized. The daytime ionosphere is created by solar EUV radiation incident on the thermosphere; it is in photochemical equilibrium near its peak at about 142 km, where O2(+) is the major ion, and near diffusive equilibrium in its upper regions, where the major ion is O(+). The day-to-night plasma pressure gradient across the terminator drives a nightward ion flow which, together with electron precipitation, contributes to the formation of the nighttime ionosphere. Large-scale radial holes or plasma depletions extending downwards to nearly the ionization peak in the antisolar region are also observed which are associated with regions of strong radial magnetic fields. The ionopause is a highly dynamic and complex surface, extending from an average altitude of 290 km at the subsolar point to about 1000 km at the terminator and from 200 to over 3000 km on the nightside. A variety of solar wind interaction products are observed in the mantle, a transition region between the ionospheric plasma and the flowing shocked solar wind.
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