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Acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine among adults in the United States: How many people would get vaccinated?

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic in March 2020. Several prophylactic vaccines against COVID-19 are currently in development, yet little is known about people’s acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine. We conducted an online survey of adults ages 18 and older in the United Stat... Full description

Journal Title: Vaccine 2020-09-29, Vol.38 (42), p.6500-6507
Main Author: Reiter, Paul L
Other Authors: Pennell, Michael L , Katz, Mira L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Netherlands: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0264-410X
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32863069
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title: Acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine among adults in the United States: How many people would get vaccinated?
format: Article
creator:
  • Reiter, Paul L
  • Pennell, Michael L
  • Katz, Mira L
subjects:
  • Acceptability
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Adults
  • Betacoronavirus - drug effects
  • Betacoronavirus - immunology
  • Betacoronavirus - pathogenicity
  • Coronavirus
  • Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology
  • Coronavirus Infections - immunology
  • Coronavirus Infections - prevention & control
  • Coronavirus Infections - psychology
  • Coronavirus Infections - virology
  • Coronaviruses
  • COVID-19
  • COVID-19 Vaccines
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Epidemics
  • Health care industry
  • Health insurance
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
  • Humans
  • Immunization
  • Immunogenicity, Vaccine
  • Infections
  • Male
  • Medical research
  • Medicine, Experimental
  • Middle Aged
  • Pandemics
  • Pandemics - prevention & control
  • Patient Compliance - psychology
  • Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
  • Patient Safety
  • Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology
  • Pneumonia, Viral - immunology
  • Pneumonia, Viral - prevention & control
  • Pneumonia, Viral - virology
  • Public health
  • Risk Assessment - trends
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Treatment Refusal - psychology
  • Treatment Refusal - statistics & numerical data
  • United States - epidemiology
  • Vaccination
  • Vaccination - psychology
  • Vaccine
  • Vaccines
  • Viral diseases
  • Viral Vaccines - administration & dosage
ispartof: Vaccine, 2020-09-29, Vol.38 (42), p.6500-6507
description: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic in March 2020. Several prophylactic vaccines against COVID-19 are currently in development, yet little is known about people’s acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine. We conducted an online survey of adults ages 18 and older in the United States (n = 2,006) in May 2020. Multivariable relative risk regression identified correlates of participants’ willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine (i.e., vaccine acceptability). Overall, 69% of participants were willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Participants were more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they thought their healthcare provider would recommend vaccination (RR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.49–2.02) or if they were moderate (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.16) or liberal (RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.07–1.22) in their political leaning. Participants were also more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they reported higher levels of perceived likelihood getting a COVID-19 infection in the future (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09), perceived severity of COVID-19 infection (RR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04–1.11), or perceived effectiveness of a COVID-19 vaccine (RR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.40–1.52). Participants were less likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they were non-Latinx black (RR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74–0.90) or reported a higher level of perceived potential vaccine harms (RR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92–0.98). Many adults are willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine, though acceptability should be monitored as vaccine development continues. Our findings can help guide future efforts to increase COVID-19 vaccine acceptability (and uptake if a vaccine becomes available).
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0264-410X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0264-410X
  • 1873-2518
url: Link


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descriptionCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic in March 2020. Several prophylactic vaccines against COVID-19 are currently in development, yet little is known about people’s acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine. We conducted an online survey of adults ages 18 and older in the United States (n = 2,006) in May 2020. Multivariable relative risk regression identified correlates of participants’ willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine (i.e., vaccine acceptability). Overall, 69% of participants were willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Participants were more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they thought their healthcare provider would recommend vaccination (RR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.49–2.02) or if they were moderate (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.16) or liberal (RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.07–1.22) in their political leaning. Participants were also more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they reported higher levels of perceived likelihood getting a COVID-19 infection in the future (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09), perceived severity of COVID-19 infection (RR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04–1.11), or perceived effectiveness of a COVID-19 vaccine (RR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.40–1.52). Participants were less likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they were non-Latinx black (RR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74–0.90) or reported a higher level of perceived potential vaccine harms (RR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92–0.98). Many adults are willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine, though acceptability should be monitored as vaccine development continues. Our findings can help guide future efforts to increase COVID-19 vaccine acceptability (and uptake if a vaccine becomes available).
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abstractCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic in March 2020. Several prophylactic vaccines against COVID-19 are currently in development, yet little is known about people’s acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine. We conducted an online survey of adults ages 18 and older in the United States (n = 2,006) in May 2020. Multivariable relative risk regression identified correlates of participants’ willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine (i.e., vaccine acceptability). Overall, 69% of participants were willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Participants were more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they thought their healthcare provider would recommend vaccination (RR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.49–2.02) or if they were moderate (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.16) or liberal (RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.07–1.22) in their political leaning. Participants were also more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they reported higher levels of perceived likelihood getting a COVID-19 infection in the future (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09), perceived severity of COVID-19 infection (RR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04–1.11), or perceived effectiveness of a COVID-19 vaccine (RR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.40–1.52). Participants were less likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they were non-Latinx black (RR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74–0.90) or reported a higher level of perceived potential vaccine harms (RR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92–0.98). Many adults are willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine, though acceptability should be monitored as vaccine development continues. Our findings can help guide future efforts to increase COVID-19 vaccine acceptability (and uptake if a vaccine becomes available).
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