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Surgical Complications in Older Adults Predict Decline in Self-Perceived Cognitive Function in the Ensuing Year: A Cohort Study

•What is the primary question addressed by this study?○ We examined the effects of in-hospital complications on the changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.•What is the main finding of this study?○ We found that older adults experiencing one or more in-ho... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry 2021-04, Vol.29 (4), p.352-361
Main Author: Kannampallil, Thomas
Other Authors: Holzer, Katherine J , Abraham, Joanna , Naim, Uzma , Lenze, Eric J , Haroutounian, Simon , Avidan, Michael S
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 1064-7481
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32981851
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title: Surgical Complications in Older Adults Predict Decline in Self-Perceived Cognitive Function in the Ensuing Year: A Cohort Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Kannampallil, Thomas
  • Holzer, Katherine J
  • Abraham, Joanna
  • Naim, Uzma
  • Lenze, Eric J
  • Haroutounian, Simon
  • Avidan, Michael S
subjects:
  • anesthesia
  • cognition
  • Cognitive ability
  • Complications
  • older adults
  • Older people
  • Postoperative period
  • Studies
  • surgery
  • Surgical outcomes
ispartof: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, 2021-04, Vol.29 (4), p.352-361
description: •What is the primary question addressed by this study?○ We examined the effects of in-hospital complications on the changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.•What is the main finding of this study?○ We found that older adults experiencing one or more in-hospital complications encountered a statistically significant decrease in self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.○ Experiencing certain types of complications (e.g., respiratory, neural) were associated with greater declines in self-perceived cognitive function.•What is the meaning of the finding?○ Interventions for older adults should focus on immediate perioperative period to reduce complications to possibly mitigate decline in self-perceived cognitive function. Surgical complications are common among older adults and are potential indicators of poorer long-term outcomes. The authors examined the effects of in-hospital complications on changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery. The authors conducted a prospective longitudinal study with 2,155 older adults (age ≥ 65) undergoing surgery, investigating the association between self-reported, in-hospital complications after surgery and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Applied Cognition-Abilities survey (4 items, cognitive function) at 30 days and 1 year after surgery. Surveys were scored on a continuous scale of 0–100, with higher scores representing better self-perceived cognitive functioning. Patient characteristics including demographics, type of complications, surgery type, pain, and activities of daily living were also collected. Having one in-hospital complication was associated with a decrease of 1.79 points (95% confidence interval (CI): −2.78, −0.80), indicating lower self-perceived cognitive functioning at 1 year after surgery; having two or more in-hospital complications was associated with 2.82 point (95% CI: −4.50, −1.15) decrease at 1 year after surgery. Models specific to complication type indicated that respiratory [−3.04, (95% CI: −5.50, −0.57)], neural [−2.11, (95% CI: −3.97, −0.25)], and general complications [−2.39, (95% CI: −3.51, −1.28)] were associated with statistically significant decreases in cognitive function. Older surgical patients who suffer in-hospital complications show greater decline in self-perceived cognitive function during the ensuing year. Geriatric specialists may be able to intervene in t
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1064-7481
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1064-7481
  • 1545-7214
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description•What is the primary question addressed by this study?○ We examined the effects of in-hospital complications on the changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.•What is the main finding of this study?○ We found that older adults experiencing one or more in-hospital complications encountered a statistically significant decrease in self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.○ Experiencing certain types of complications (e.g., respiratory, neural) were associated with greater declines in self-perceived cognitive function.•What is the meaning of the finding?○ Interventions for older adults should focus on immediate perioperative period to reduce complications to possibly mitigate decline in self-perceived cognitive function. Surgical complications are common among older adults and are potential indicators of poorer long-term outcomes. The authors examined the effects of in-hospital complications on changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery. The authors conducted a prospective longitudinal study with 2,155 older adults (age ≥ 65) undergoing surgery, investigating the association between self-reported, in-hospital complications after surgery and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Applied Cognition-Abilities survey (4 items, cognitive function) at 30 days and 1 year after surgery. Surveys were scored on a continuous scale of 0–100, with higher scores representing better self-perceived cognitive functioning. Patient characteristics including demographics, type of complications, surgery type, pain, and activities of daily living were also collected. Having one in-hospital complication was associated with a decrease of 1.79 points (95% confidence interval (CI): −2.78, −0.80), indicating lower self-perceived cognitive functioning at 1 year after surgery; having two or more in-hospital complications was associated with 2.82 point (95% CI: −4.50, −1.15) decrease at 1 year after surgery. Models specific to complication type indicated that respiratory [−3.04, (95% CI: −5.50, −0.57)], neural [−2.11, (95% CI: −3.97, −0.25)], and general complications [−2.39, (95% CI: −3.51, −1.28)] were associated with statistically significant decreases in cognitive function. Older surgical patients who suffer in-hospital complications show greater decline in self-perceived cognitive function during the ensuing year. Geriatric specialists may be able to intervene in the immediate perioperative period to reduce complications and possibly mitigate cognitive decline among older adults.
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subjectanesthesia ; cognition ; Cognitive ability ; Complications ; older adults ; Older people ; Postoperative period ; Studies ; surgery ; Surgical outcomes
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description•What is the primary question addressed by this study?○ We examined the effects of in-hospital complications on the changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.•What is the main finding of this study?○ We found that older adults experiencing one or more in-hospital complications encountered a statistically significant decrease in self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.○ Experiencing certain types of complications (e.g., respiratory, neural) were associated with greater declines in self-perceived cognitive function.•What is the meaning of the finding?○ Interventions for older adults should focus on immediate perioperative period to reduce complications to possibly mitigate decline in self-perceived cognitive function. Surgical complications are common among older adults and are potential indicators of poorer long-term outcomes. The authors examined the effects of in-hospital complications on changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery. The authors conducted a prospective longitudinal study with 2,155 older adults (age ≥ 65) undergoing surgery, investigating the association between self-reported, in-hospital complications after surgery and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Applied Cognition-Abilities survey (4 items, cognitive function) at 30 days and 1 year after surgery. Surveys were scored on a continuous scale of 0–100, with higher scores representing better self-perceived cognitive functioning. Patient characteristics including demographics, type of complications, surgery type, pain, and activities of daily living were also collected. Having one in-hospital complication was associated with a decrease of 1.79 points (95% confidence interval (CI): −2.78, −0.80), indicating lower self-perceived cognitive functioning at 1 year after surgery; having two or more in-hospital complications was associated with 2.82 point (95% CI: −4.50, −1.15) decrease at 1 year after surgery. Models specific to complication type indicated that respiratory [−3.04, (95% CI: −5.50, −0.57)], neural [−2.11, (95% CI: −3.97, −0.25)], and general complications [−2.39, (95% CI: −3.51, −1.28)] were associated with statistically significant decreases in cognitive function. Older surgical patients who suffer in-hospital complications show greater decline in self-perceived cognitive function during the ensuing year. Geriatric specialists may be able to intervene in the immediate perioperative period to reduce complications and possibly mitigate cognitive decline among older adults.
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abstract•What is the primary question addressed by this study?○ We examined the effects of in-hospital complications on the changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.•What is the main finding of this study?○ We found that older adults experiencing one or more in-hospital complications encountered a statistically significant decrease in self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery.○ Experiencing certain types of complications (e.g., respiratory, neural) were associated with greater declines in self-perceived cognitive function.•What is the meaning of the finding?○ Interventions for older adults should focus on immediate perioperative period to reduce complications to possibly mitigate decline in self-perceived cognitive function. Surgical complications are common among older adults and are potential indicators of poorer long-term outcomes. The authors examined the effects of in-hospital complications on changes in older adults’ self-perceived cognitive function in the year after surgery. The authors conducted a prospective longitudinal study with 2,155 older adults (age ≥ 65) undergoing surgery, investigating the association between self-reported, in-hospital complications after surgery and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Applied Cognition-Abilities survey (4 items, cognitive function) at 30 days and 1 year after surgery. Surveys were scored on a continuous scale of 0–100, with higher scores representing better self-perceived cognitive functioning. Patient characteristics including demographics, type of complications, surgery type, pain, and activities of daily living were also collected. Having one in-hospital complication was associated with a decrease of 1.79 points (95% confidence interval (CI): −2.78, −0.80), indicating lower self-perceived cognitive functioning at 1 year after surgery; having two or more in-hospital complications was associated with 2.82 point (95% CI: −4.50, −1.15) decrease at 1 year after surgery. Models specific to complication type indicated that respiratory [−3.04, (95% CI: −5.50, −0.57)], neural [−2.11, (95% CI: −3.97, −0.25)], and general complications [−2.39, (95% CI: −3.51, −1.28)] were associated with statistically significant decreases in cognitive function. Older surgical patients who suffer in-hospital complications show greater decline in self-perceived cognitive function during the ensuing year. Geriatric specialists may be able to intervene in the immediate perioperative period to reduce complications and possibly mitigate cognitive decline among older adults.
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pubElsevier Inc
pmid32981851
doi10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.007