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Individual differences and expatriate assignment effectiveness: The case of U.S.-based Korean expatriates

The paper examines the relationships among individual differences, cross-cultural adjustment, and expatriate assignment effectiveness, using a field survey of U.S.-based Korean expatriates. Overall, the findings are consistent with the literature and support previous findings. However, a unique and... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of world business : JWB 2008, Vol.43 (1), p.109-126
Main Author: Kim, Kwanghyun
Other Authors: Slocum, John W.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Greenwich: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 1090-9516
Link: http://econpapers.repec.org/article/eeeworbus/v_3a43_3ay_3a2008_3ai_3a1_3ap_3a109-126.htm
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title: Individual differences and expatriate assignment effectiveness: The case of U.S.-based Korean expatriates
format: Article
creator:
  • Kim, Kwanghyun
  • Slocum, John W.
subjects:
  • Adjustment
  • Alien labor
  • Business studies
  • Correlation analysis
  • Cross-cultural adjustment
  • Culture
  • Enterprises
  • Expatriates
  • Expatriates Individual differences Cross-cultural adjustment Korean managers
  • Individual differences
  • Korean managers
  • Organizational behavior
  • Social adaptation
  • Social aspects
  • South Korea
  • Studies
  • U.S.A
ispartof: Journal of world business : JWB, 2008, Vol.43 (1), p.109-126
description: The paper examines the relationships among individual differences, cross-cultural adjustment, and expatriate assignment effectiveness, using a field survey of U.S.-based Korean expatriates. Overall, the findings are consistent with the literature and support previous findings. However, a unique and interesting pattern was found, revealing that how well the expatriates adjusted to the assignment was not related to their premature return intention. This finding is attributed to Korean society's tight cultural norms, expectancy for positive career outcomes when completing such assignments, and desire to provide diverse educational opportunities and life experiences for their children and family when staying in the preferred assignment destination. Theoretical and practical implications are also discussed.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1090-9516
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1090-9516
  • 1878-5573
url: Link


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descriptionThe paper examines the relationships among individual differences, cross-cultural adjustment, and expatriate assignment effectiveness, using a field survey of U.S.-based Korean expatriates. Overall, the findings are consistent with the literature and support previous findings. However, a unique and interesting pattern was found, revealing that how well the expatriates adjusted to the assignment was not related to their premature return intention. This finding is attributed to Korean society's tight cultural norms, expectancy for positive career outcomes when completing such assignments, and desire to provide diverse educational opportunities and life experiences for their children and family when staying in the preferred assignment destination. Theoretical and practical implications are also discussed.
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subjectAdjustment ; Alien labor ; Business studies ; Correlation analysis ; Cross-cultural adjustment ; Culture ; Enterprises ; Expatriates ; Expatriates Individual differences Cross-cultural adjustment Korean managers ; Individual differences ; Korean managers ; Organizational behavior ; Social adaptation ; Social aspects ; South Korea ; Studies ; U.S.A
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abstractThe paper examines the relationships among individual differences, cross-cultural adjustment, and expatriate assignment effectiveness, using a field survey of U.S.-based Korean expatriates. Overall, the findings are consistent with the literature and support previous findings. However, a unique and interesting pattern was found, revealing that how well the expatriates adjusted to the assignment was not related to their premature return intention. This finding is attributed to Korean society's tight cultural norms, expectancy for positive career outcomes when completing such assignments, and desire to provide diverse educational opportunities and life experiences for their children and family when staying in the preferred assignment destination. Theoretical and practical implications are also discussed.
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