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Childhood intelligence, locus of control and behaviour disturbance as determinants of intergenerational social mobility: British Cohort Study 1970

Determinants of intergenerational social mobility were examined in 8287 men from the British Cohort Study 1970. Confirming previous research, parental social class, childhood intelligence, and educational qualifications were the strongest predictors of occupational social class at the age of 30. Loc... Full description

Journal Title: Intelligence (Norwood) 2009, Vol.37 (4), p.329-340
Main Author: von Stumm, Sophie
Other Authors: Gale, Catharine R , Batty, G. David , Deary, Ian J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
Publisher: Amsterdam: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0160-2896
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=21649639
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_57300168
title: Childhood intelligence, locus of control and behaviour disturbance as determinants of intergenerational social mobility: British Cohort Study 1970
format: Article
creator:
  • von Stumm, Sophie
  • Gale, Catharine R
  • Batty, G. David
  • Deary, Ian J
subjects:
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Child
  • Child development
  • Child psychology
  • Childhood
  • Childhood behaviour
  • Children & youth
  • Cognition. Intelligence
  • Developmental psychology
  • Education
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Intellectual and cognitive abilities
  • Intelligence
  • Intergenerational mobility
  • Intergenerational relationships
  • Locus of control
  • Men
  • Mobility
  • Nexus
  • Occupation
  • Occupations
  • Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry
  • Psychology. Psychophysiology
  • Social class
  • Social mobility
  • Social research
ispartof: Intelligence (Norwood), 2009, Vol.37 (4), p.329-340
description: Determinants of intergenerational social mobility were examined in 8287 men from the British Cohort Study 1970. Confirming previous research, parental social class, childhood intelligence, and educational qualifications were the strongest predictors of occupational social class at the age of 30. Locus of control and childhood behaviour disturbance had independent significant effects and accounted for additional amounts of variance. Self-esteem had only a trivial influence on social mobility. Structural equation modelling using full information maximum likelihood estimation demonstrated that: educational qualifications mediated other predictors' effects, accounting for the greatest amount of variance in people's own social status attainment; there was a substantial overlap of childhood behavioural disturbance, intelligence, and locus of control; there were effects of parental social class on own occupational social class attainment. Intergenerational social mobility is determined by a nexus of inter-correlated variables whose independent effects remain difficult to disentangle.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0160-2896
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0160-2896
  • 1873-7935
url: Link


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descriptionDeterminants of intergenerational social mobility were examined in 8287 men from the British Cohort Study 1970. Confirming previous research, parental social class, childhood intelligence, and educational qualifications were the strongest predictors of occupational social class at the age of 30. Locus of control and childhood behaviour disturbance had independent significant effects and accounted for additional amounts of variance. Self-esteem had only a trivial influence on social mobility. Structural equation modelling using full information maximum likelihood estimation demonstrated that: educational qualifications mediated other predictors' effects, accounting for the greatest amount of variance in people's own social status attainment; there was a substantial overlap of childhood behavioural disturbance, intelligence, and locus of control; there were effects of parental social class on own occupational social class attainment. Intergenerational social mobility is determined by a nexus of inter-correlated variables whose independent effects remain difficult to disentangle.
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subjectBiological and medical sciences ; Child ; Child development ; Child psychology ; Childhood ; Childhood behaviour ; Children & youth ; Cognition. Intelligence ; Developmental psychology ; Education ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Intellectual and cognitive abilities ; Intelligence ; Intergenerational mobility ; Intergenerational relationships ; Locus of control ; Men ; Mobility ; Nexus ; Occupation ; Occupations ; Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry ; Psychology. Psychophysiology ; Social class ; Social mobility ; Social research
ispartofIntelligence (Norwood), 2009, Vol.37 (4), p.329-340
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abstractDeterminants of intergenerational social mobility were examined in 8287 men from the British Cohort Study 1970. Confirming previous research, parental social class, childhood intelligence, and educational qualifications were the strongest predictors of occupational social class at the age of 30. Locus of control and childhood behaviour disturbance had independent significant effects and accounted for additional amounts of variance. Self-esteem had only a trivial influence on social mobility. Structural equation modelling using full information maximum likelihood estimation demonstrated that: educational qualifications mediated other predictors' effects, accounting for the greatest amount of variance in people's own social status attainment; there was a substantial overlap of childhood behavioural disturbance, intelligence, and locus of control; there were effects of parental social class on own occupational social class attainment. Intergenerational social mobility is determined by a nexus of inter-correlated variables whose independent effects remain difficult to disentangle.
copAmsterdam
pubElsevier Inc
doi10.1016/j.intell.2009.04.002