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Did Falling Wages and Employment Increase U.S. Imprisonment?

This paper studies the effects of wages and employment on men's prison admission rates in the United States from 1983 to 2001. Research on the effects of the labor market on incarceration usually examines national- or state-level data, but our analysis studies prison admission among black and white... Full description

Journal Title: Social forces 2006, Vol.84 (4), p.2291-2311
Main Author: Western, Bruce
Other Authors: Kleykamp, Meredith , Rosenfeld, Jake
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press
ID: ISSN: 0037-7732
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=17848603
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_60036735
title: Did Falling Wages and Employment Increase U.S. Imprisonment?
format: Article
creator:
  • Western, Bruce
  • Kleykamp, Meredith
  • Rosenfeld, Jake
subjects:
  • Age groups
  • Black people
  • Black White Differences
  • Crime
  • Criminal justice
  • Criminal punishment
  • Criminal sociology. Police. Delinquency. Deviance. Suicide
  • Economic aspects
  • Education
  • Educational Inequality
  • Employment
  • Forecasts and trends
  • Imprisonment
  • Income distribution
  • Income inequality
  • Inequality
  • Labor market
  • Labor markets
  • Labour market
  • Males
  • Market trend/market analysis
  • Men
  • Prisoners
  • Prisons
  • Racial differences
  • Racial discrimination
  • Regression analysis
  • Risk Factors
  • School dropouts
  • Social aspects
  • Sociology
  • Sociology of law and criminology
  • Statistics
  • Time series
  • U.S.A
  • United States
  • Violent crimes
  • Wages
  • Wages & salaries
ispartof: Social forces, 2006, Vol.84 (4), p.2291-2311
description: This paper studies the effects of wages and employment on men's prison admission rates in the United States from 1983 to 2001. Research on the effects of the labor market on incarceration usually examines national- or state-level data, but our analysis studies prison admission among black and white men in specific age-education groups. We find a significant increase in educational inequality in incarceration; nearly all the growth in the risk of imprisonment was confined to non-college men. Regression analysis of prison admission rates shows the negative effects of wages and employment on black men's incarceration, and the negative effects of wages on white men's imprisonment. If 1980s' wage and employment levels had persisted through the late 1990s, the estimates suggest that prison admission rates would be 15 to 25 percent lower for all non-college men.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0037-7732
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0037-7732
  • 1534-7605
url: Link


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descriptionThis paper studies the effects of wages and employment on men's prison admission rates in the United States from 1983 to 2001. Research on the effects of the labor market on incarceration usually examines national- or state-level data, but our analysis studies prison admission among black and white men in specific age-education groups. We find a significant increase in educational inequality in incarceration; nearly all the growth in the risk of imprisonment was confined to non-college men. Regression analysis of prison admission rates shows the negative effects of wages and employment on black men's incarceration, and the negative effects of wages on white men's imprisonment. If 1980s' wage and employment levels had persisted through the late 1990s, the estimates suggest that prison admission rates would be 15 to 25 percent lower for all non-college men.
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subjectAge groups ; Black people ; Black White Differences ; Crime ; Criminal justice ; Criminal punishment ; Criminal sociology. Police. Delinquency. Deviance. Suicide ; Economic aspects ; Education ; Educational Inequality ; Employment ; Forecasts and trends ; Imprisonment ; Income distribution ; Income inequality ; Inequality ; Labor market ; Labor markets ; Labour market ; Males ; Market trend/market analysis ; Men ; Prisoners ; Prisons ; Racial differences ; Racial discrimination ; Regression analysis ; Risk Factors ; School dropouts ; Social aspects ; Sociology ; Sociology of law and criminology ; Statistics ; Time series ; U.S.A ; United States ; Violent crimes ; Wages ; Wages & salaries
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descriptionThis paper studies the effects of wages and employment on men's prison admission rates in the United States from 1983 to 2001. Research on the effects of the labor market on incarceration usually examines national- or state-level data, but our analysis studies prison admission among black and white men in specific age-education groups. We find a significant increase in educational inequality in incarceration; nearly all the growth in the risk of imprisonment was confined to non-college men. Regression analysis of prison admission rates shows the negative effects of wages and employment on black men's incarceration, and the negative effects of wages on white men's imprisonment. If 1980s' wage and employment levels had persisted through the late 1990s, the estimates suggest that prison admission rates would be 15 to 25 percent lower for all non-college men.
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abstractThis paper studies the effects of wages and employment on men's prison admission rates in the United States from 1983 to 2001. Research on the effects of the labor market on incarceration usually examines national- or state-level data, but our analysis studies prison admission among black and white men in specific age-education groups. We find a significant increase in educational inequality in incarceration; nearly all the growth in the risk of imprisonment was confined to non-college men. Regression analysis of prison admission rates shows the negative effects of wages and employment on black men's incarceration, and the negative effects of wages on white men's imprisonment. If 1980s' wage and employment levels had persisted through the late 1990s, the estimates suggest that prison admission rates would be 15 to 25 percent lower for all non-college men.
copChapel Hill, NC
pubThe University of North Carolina Press
doi10.1353/sof.2006.0114
tpages21