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Pushing the boundaries of viability: The economic impact of extreme preterm birth

Previous assessments of the economic impact of preterm birth focussed on short term health service costs across the broad spectrum of prematurity. To estimate the societal costs of extreme preterm birth during the sixth year after birth. Unit costs were applied to estimates of health, social and bro... Full description

Journal Title: Early human development 2006, Vol.82 (2), p.77-84
Main Author: Petrou, Stavros
Other Authors: Henderson, Jane , Bracewell, Melanie , Hockley, Christine , Wolke, Dieter , Marlow, Neil
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Ireland: Elsevier Ireland Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0378-3782
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16466865
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_67666303
title: Pushing the boundaries of viability: The economic impact of extreme preterm birth
format: Article
creator:
  • Petrou, Stavros
  • Henderson, Jane
  • Bracewell, Melanie
  • Hockley, Christine
  • Wolke, Dieter
  • Marlow, Neil
subjects:
  • Birth defects
  • Cohort Studies
  • Costs and Cost Analysis
  • Demography
  • Economic aspects
  • Economics
  • Female
  • Gestational Age
  • Health Care Rationing
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Influence
  • Ireland
  • Linear Models
  • Male
  • Medical care, Cost of
  • Newborn
  • Pregnancy
  • Premature Birth - economics
  • Prematurity
  • Resource utilization
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • United Kingdom
ispartof: Early human development, 2006, Vol.82 (2), p.77-84
description: Previous assessments of the economic impact of preterm birth focussed on short term health service costs across the broad spectrum of prematurity. To estimate the societal costs of extreme preterm birth during the sixth year after birth. Unit costs were applied to estimates of health, social and broader resource use made by 241 children born at 20 through 25 completed weeks of gestation in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland and a comparison group of 160 children born at full term. Societal costs per child during the sixth year after birth were estimated and subjected to a rigorous sensitivity analysis. The effects of gestational age at birth on annual societal costs were analysed, first in a simple linear regression and then in a multiple linear regression. Mean societal costs over the 12 month period were £9541 (standard deviation £11,678) for the extreme preterm group and £3883 (£1098) for the term group, generating a mean cost difference of £5658 (bootstrap 95% confidence interval: £4203, £7256) that was statistically significant ( P < 0.001). After adjustment for clinical and sociodemographic covariates, sex-specific extreme preterm birth was a strong predictor of high societal costs. The results of this study should facilitate the effective planning of services and may be used to inform the development of future economic evaluations of interventions aimed at preventing extreme preterm birth or alleviating its effects.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0378-3782
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0378-3782
  • 1872-6232
url: Link


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descriptionPrevious assessments of the economic impact of preterm birth focussed on short term health service costs across the broad spectrum of prematurity. To estimate the societal costs of extreme preterm birth during the sixth year after birth. Unit costs were applied to estimates of health, social and broader resource use made by 241 children born at 20 through 25 completed weeks of gestation in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland and a comparison group of 160 children born at full term. Societal costs per child during the sixth year after birth were estimated and subjected to a rigorous sensitivity analysis. The effects of gestational age at birth on annual societal costs were analysed, first in a simple linear regression and then in a multiple linear regression. Mean societal costs over the 12 month period were £9541 (standard deviation £11,678) for the extreme preterm group and £3883 (£1098) for the term group, generating a mean cost difference of £5658 (bootstrap 95% confidence interval: £4203, £7256) that was statistically significant ( P < 0.001). After adjustment for clinical and sociodemographic covariates, sex-specific extreme preterm birth was a strong predictor of high societal costs. The results of this study should facilitate the effective planning of services and may be used to inform the development of future economic evaluations of interventions aimed at preventing extreme preterm birth or alleviating its effects.
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subjectBirth defects ; Cohort Studies ; Costs and Cost Analysis ; Demography ; Economic aspects ; Economics ; Female ; Gestational Age ; Health Care Rationing ; Humans ; Infant ; Infant, Newborn ; Influence ; Ireland ; Linear Models ; Male ; Medical care, Cost of ; Newborn ; Pregnancy ; Premature Birth - economics ; Prematurity ; Resource utilization ; Socioeconomic Factors ; United Kingdom
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descriptionPrevious assessments of the economic impact of preterm birth focussed on short term health service costs across the broad spectrum of prematurity. To estimate the societal costs of extreme preterm birth during the sixth year after birth. Unit costs were applied to estimates of health, social and broader resource use made by 241 children born at 20 through 25 completed weeks of gestation in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland and a comparison group of 160 children born at full term. Societal costs per child during the sixth year after birth were estimated and subjected to a rigorous sensitivity analysis. The effects of gestational age at birth on annual societal costs were analysed, first in a simple linear regression and then in a multiple linear regression. Mean societal costs over the 12 month period were £9541 (standard deviation £11,678) for the extreme preterm group and £3883 (£1098) for the term group, generating a mean cost difference of £5658 (bootstrap 95% confidence interval: £4203, £7256) that was statistically significant ( P < 0.001). After adjustment for clinical and sociodemographic covariates, sex-specific extreme preterm birth was a strong predictor of high societal costs. The results of this study should facilitate the effective planning of services and may be used to inform the development of future economic evaluations of interventions aimed at preventing extreme preterm birth or alleviating its effects.
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abstractPrevious assessments of the economic impact of preterm birth focussed on short term health service costs across the broad spectrum of prematurity. To estimate the societal costs of extreme preterm birth during the sixth year after birth. Unit costs were applied to estimates of health, social and broader resource use made by 241 children born at 20 through 25 completed weeks of gestation in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland and a comparison group of 160 children born at full term. Societal costs per child during the sixth year after birth were estimated and subjected to a rigorous sensitivity analysis. The effects of gestational age at birth on annual societal costs were analysed, first in a simple linear regression and then in a multiple linear regression. Mean societal costs over the 12 month period were £9541 (standard deviation £11,678) for the extreme preterm group and £3883 (£1098) for the term group, generating a mean cost difference of £5658 (bootstrap 95% confidence interval: £4203, £7256) that was statistically significant ( P < 0.001). After adjustment for clinical and sociodemographic covariates, sex-specific extreme preterm birth was a strong predictor of high societal costs. The results of this study should facilitate the effective planning of services and may be used to inform the development of future economic evaluations of interventions aimed at preventing extreme preterm birth or alleviating its effects.
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pmid16466865
doi10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2006.01.002