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Early stone technology on Flores and its implications for Homo floresiensis

In the Soa Basin of central Flores, eastern Indonesia, stratified archaeological sites, including Mata Menge, Boa Lesa and Kobatuwa (Fig. 1), contain stone artefacts associated with the fossilized remains of Stegodon florensis, Komodo dragon, rat and various other taxa. These sites have been dated t... Full description

Journal Title: Nature 2006-06-01, Vol.441 (7093), p.624-628
Main Author: Aziz, Fachroel
Other Authors: Morwood, Michael J , Kurniawan, Iwan , Brumm, Adam , Fullagar, Richard , Moore, Mark W , van den Bergh, Gert D , Hobbs, Douglas R
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Boa
Publisher: England
ID: ISSN: 0028-0836
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16738657
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title: Early stone technology on Flores and its implications for Homo floresiensis
format: Article
creator:
  • Aziz, Fachroel
  • Morwood, Michael J
  • Kurniawan, Iwan
  • Brumm, Adam
  • Fullagar, Richard
  • Moore, Mark W
  • van den Bergh, Gert D
  • Hobbs, Douglas R
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Archaeology
  • Biological Evolution
  • Boa
  • Fossils
  • History, Ancient
  • Hominidae - anatomy & histology
  • Hominidae - classification
  • Hominidae - physiology
  • Humans
  • Indonesia
  • Phylogeny
  • Rats
  • Technology - history
  • Time Factors
ispartof: Nature, 2006-06-01, Vol.441 (7093), p.624-628
description: In the Soa Basin of central Flores, eastern Indonesia, stratified archaeological sites, including Mata Menge, Boa Lesa and Kobatuwa (Fig. 1), contain stone artefacts associated with the fossilized remains of Stegodon florensis, Komodo dragon, rat and various other taxa. These sites have been dated to 840–700 kyr bp (thousand years before present). The authenticity of the Soa Basin artefacts and their provenance have been demonstrated by previous work, but to quell lingering doubts, here we describe the context, attributes and production modes of 507 artefacts excavated at Mata Menge. We also note specific similarities, and apparent technological continuity, between the Mata Menge stone artefacts and those excavated from Late Pleistocene levels at Liang Bua cave, 50 km to the west. The latter artefacts, dated to between 95–74 and 12 kyr ago, are associated with the remains of a dwarfed descendent of S. florensis, Komodo dragon, rat and a small-bodied hominin species, Homo floresiensis, which had a brain size of about 400 cubic centimetres. The Mata Menge evidence negates claims that stone artefacts associated with H. floresiensis are so complex that they must have been made by modern humans (Homo sapiens).
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0028-0836
  • 1476-4687
  • 1476-4679
url: Link


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descriptionIn the Soa Basin of central Flores, eastern Indonesia, stratified archaeological sites, including Mata Menge, Boa Lesa and Kobatuwa (Fig. 1), contain stone artefacts associated with the fossilized remains of Stegodon florensis, Komodo dragon, rat and various other taxa. These sites have been dated to 840–700 kyr bp (thousand years before present). The authenticity of the Soa Basin artefacts and their provenance have been demonstrated by previous work, but to quell lingering doubts, here we describe the context, attributes and production modes of 507 artefacts excavated at Mata Menge. We also note specific similarities, and apparent technological continuity, between the Mata Menge stone artefacts and those excavated from Late Pleistocene levels at Liang Bua cave, 50 km to the west. The latter artefacts, dated to between 95–74 and 12 kyr ago, are associated with the remains of a dwarfed descendent of S. florensis, Komodo dragon, rat and a small-bodied hominin species, Homo floresiensis, which had a brain size of about 400 cubic centimetres. The Mata Menge evidence negates claims that stone artefacts associated with H. floresiensis are so complex that they must have been made by modern humans (Homo sapiens).
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subjectAnimals ; Archaeology ; Biological Evolution ; Boa ; Fossils ; History, Ancient ; Hominidae - anatomy & histology ; Hominidae - classification ; Hominidae - physiology ; Humans ; Indonesia ; Phylogeny ; Rats ; Technology - history ; Time Factors
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abstractIn the Soa Basin of central Flores, eastern Indonesia, stratified archaeological sites, including Mata Menge, Boa Lesa and Kobatuwa (Fig. 1), contain stone artefacts associated with the fossilized remains of Stegodon florensis, Komodo dragon, rat and various other taxa. These sites have been dated to 840–700 kyr bp (thousand years before present). The authenticity of the Soa Basin artefacts and their provenance have been demonstrated by previous work, but to quell lingering doubts, here we describe the context, attributes and production modes of 507 artefacts excavated at Mata Menge. We also note specific similarities, and apparent technological continuity, between the Mata Menge stone artefacts and those excavated from Late Pleistocene levels at Liang Bua cave, 50 km to the west. The latter artefacts, dated to between 95–74 and 12 kyr ago, are associated with the remains of a dwarfed descendent of S. florensis, Komodo dragon, rat and a small-bodied hominin species, Homo floresiensis, which had a brain size of about 400 cubic centimetres. The Mata Menge evidence negates claims that stone artefacts associated with H. floresiensis are so complex that they must have been made by modern humans (Homo sapiens).
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pmid16738657
doi10.1038/nature04618