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Implications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya

Sites in eastern Africa have shed light on the emergence and early evolution of the genus Homo. The best known early hominin species, H. habilis and H. erectus, have often been interpreted as time-successive segments of a single anagenetic evolutionary lineage. The case for this was strengthened by... Full description

Journal Title: Nature 2007-08-09, Vol.448 (7154), p.688-691
Main Author: Spoor, F
Other Authors: Antón, S. C , Gathogo, P. N , Leakey, M. G , McDougall, I , Brown, F. H , Kiarie, C , Leakey, L. N , Manthi, F. K
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: England: Nature Publishing Group
ID: ISSN: 0028-0836
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17687323
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_68152370
title: Implications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
format: Article
creator:
  • Spoor, F
  • Antón, S. C
  • Gathogo, P. N
  • Leakey, M. G
  • McDougall, I
  • Brown, F. H
  • Kiarie, C
  • Leakey, L. N
  • Manthi, F. K
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Basins
  • Construction
  • Continuity
  • Ecosystem
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary
  • Female
  • Fossils
  • Hominidae - anatomy & histology
  • Hominidae - classification
  • Hominidae - physiology
  • Humans
  • Kenya
  • Lakes
  • Male
  • Maxilla - anatomy & histology
  • Molar - anatomy & histology
  • Organ Size
  • Segments
  • Sex Characteristics
  • Skull - anatomy & histology
  • Species Specificity
  • Time Factors
ispartof: Nature, 2007-08-09, Vol.448 (7154), p.688-691
description: Sites in eastern Africa have shed light on the emergence and early evolution of the genus Homo. The best known early hominin species, H. habilis and H. erectus, have often been interpreted as time-successive segments of a single anagenetic evolutionary lineage. The case for this was strengthened by the discovery of small early Pleistocene hominin crania from Dmanisi in Georgia that apparently provide evidence of morphological continuity between the two taxa. Here we describe two new cranial fossils from the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, that have bearing on the relationship between species of early Homo. A partial maxilla assigned to H. habilis reliably demonstrates that this species survived until later than previously recognized, making an anagenetic relationship with H. erectus unlikely. The discovery of a particularly small calvaria of H. erectus indicates that this taxon overlapped in size with H. habilis, and may have shown marked sexual dimorphism. The new fossils confirm the distinctiveness of H. habilis and H. erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0028-0836
  • 1476-4687
  • 1476-4679
url: Link


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titleImplications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
creatorSpoor, F ; Antón, S. C ; Gathogo, P. N ; Leakey, M. G ; McDougall, I ; Brown, F. H ; Kiarie, C ; Leakey, L. N ; Manthi, F. K
creatorcontribSpoor, F ; Antón, S. C ; Gathogo, P. N ; Leakey, M. G ; McDougall, I ; Brown, F. H ; Kiarie, C ; Leakey, L. N ; Manthi, F. K
descriptionSites in eastern Africa have shed light on the emergence and early evolution of the genus Homo. The best known early hominin species, H. habilis and H. erectus, have often been interpreted as time-successive segments of a single anagenetic evolutionary lineage. The case for this was strengthened by the discovery of small early Pleistocene hominin crania from Dmanisi in Georgia that apparently provide evidence of morphological continuity between the two taxa. Here we describe two new cranial fossils from the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, that have bearing on the relationship between species of early Homo. A partial maxilla assigned to H. habilis reliably demonstrates that this species survived until later than previously recognized, making an anagenetic relationship with H. erectus unlikely. The discovery of a particularly small calvaria of H. erectus indicates that this taxon overlapped in size with H. habilis, and may have shown marked sexual dimorphism. The new fossils confirm the distinctiveness of H. habilis and H. erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years.
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subjectAnimals ; Basins ; Construction ; Continuity ; Ecosystem ; Evolution ; Evolutionary ; Female ; Fossils ; Hominidae - anatomy & histology ; Hominidae - classification ; Hominidae - physiology ; Humans ; Kenya ; Lakes ; Male ; Maxilla - anatomy & histology ; Molar - anatomy & histology ; Organ Size ; Segments ; Sex Characteristics ; Skull - anatomy & histology ; Species Specificity ; Time Factors
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descriptionSites in eastern Africa have shed light on the emergence and early evolution of the genus Homo. The best known early hominin species, H. habilis and H. erectus, have often been interpreted as time-successive segments of a single anagenetic evolutionary lineage. The case for this was strengthened by the discovery of small early Pleistocene hominin crania from Dmanisi in Georgia that apparently provide evidence of morphological continuity between the two taxa. Here we describe two new cranial fossils from the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, that have bearing on the relationship between species of early Homo. A partial maxilla assigned to H. habilis reliably demonstrates that this species survived until later than previously recognized, making an anagenetic relationship with H. erectus unlikely. The discovery of a particularly small calvaria of H. erectus indicates that this taxon overlapped in size with H. habilis, and may have shown marked sexual dimorphism. The new fossils confirm the distinctiveness of H. habilis and H. erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years.
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titleImplications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
authorSpoor, F ; Antón, S. C ; Gathogo, P. N ; Leakey, M. G ; McDougall, I ; Brown, F. H ; Kiarie, C ; Leakey, L. N ; Manthi, F. K
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abstractSites in eastern Africa have shed light on the emergence and early evolution of the genus Homo. The best known early hominin species, H. habilis and H. erectus, have often been interpreted as time-successive segments of a single anagenetic evolutionary lineage. The case for this was strengthened by the discovery of small early Pleistocene hominin crania from Dmanisi in Georgia that apparently provide evidence of morphological continuity between the two taxa. Here we describe two new cranial fossils from the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, that have bearing on the relationship between species of early Homo. A partial maxilla assigned to H. habilis reliably demonstrates that this species survived until later than previously recognized, making an anagenetic relationship with H. erectus unlikely. The discovery of a particularly small calvaria of H. erectus indicates that this taxon overlapped in size with H. habilis, and may have shown marked sexual dimorphism. The new fossils confirm the distinctiveness of H. habilis and H. erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years.
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