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Adult Height and Lung Function as Markers of Life Course Exposures: Associations with Risk Factors and Cause-Specific Mortality

Background and objective: Pulmonary function and height may be regarded as adult indices of exposures accumulated across the entire life course and in early life, respectively. As such, we hypothesised that pulmonary function would be more strongly related to mortality than height. Studies of the as... Full description

Journal Title: European journal of epidemiology 2006, Vol.21 (11), p.795-801
Main Author: BATTY, G. David
Other Authors: GUNNELL, David , LANGENBERG, Claudia , SMITH, George Davey , MARMOT, Michael G , SHIPLEY, Martin J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
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Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0393-2990
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title: Adult Height and Lung Function as Markers of Life Course Exposures: Associations with Risk Factors and Cause-Specific Mortality
format: Article
creator:
  • BATTY, G. David
  • GUNNELL, David
  • LANGENBERG, Claudia
  • SMITH, George Davey
  • MARMOT, Michael G
  • SHIPLEY, Martin J
subjects:
  • Adults
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Body Height
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Cohort Studies
  • Diabetes
  • Epidemiology
  • Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
  • General aspects
  • Health outcomes
  • Heart diseases
  • Height
  • Humans
  • Hypotheses
  • Lung Diseases - mortality
  • Lungs
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • Mortality
  • P values
  • Pneumology
  • Predisposing factors
  • Prospective Studies
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Risk Factors
ispartof: European journal of epidemiology, 2006, Vol.21 (11), p.795-801
description: Background and objective: Pulmonary function and height may be regarded as adult indices of exposures accumulated across the entire life course and in early life, respectively. As such, we hypothesised that pulmonary function would be more strongly related to mortality than height. Studies of the association of height and lung function with mortality -- which are currently modest in number -- will clarify the relative utility of these risk indices and the mechanisms underlying observed patterns of disease risk. Design, setting, and participants: Data were drawn from the Whitehall study, a prospective cohort study of 18,403 middle-aged non-industrial London-based male government employees conducted in the late 1960s. Data were collected on stature, spirometry measures (including forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1]) and a range of covariates. These analyses are based on the 3083 non-smoking men with complete data. Main outcome measures: Mortality ascribed to all-causes, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and site-specific cancers. Results: Both height and FEV1 were associated with a range of physiological, behavioural and socio-economic risk factors. Relations with these risk factors were seen more frequently for FEV1 and, where they occurred, were of somewhat higher magnitude. During a maximum of 35 years follow-up, half the non-smokers had died (n = 1545).$\text{FEV}1\ \text{(HR}_{\text{per}\ \text{one}\ \text{SD}\ \text{increase}};\ 0.89;\ 0.84,\ 0.95)$was somewhat more strongly related to total mortality than height (0.96; 0.91, 1.01) in a fully adjusted model, but this difference did not attain statistical significance at conventional levels (p-value for difference = 0.15). Of the eight independent disease-specific outcomes examined, the only convincing evidence of a differential effect was for deaths from respiratory causes which was unsurprisingly more strongly related to FEV1 than height (p-value for difference = 0.03). Conclusions: In the present study, height and FEV1 were essentially similarly related to both risk factors and mortality outcomes, thus not providing support for our hypothesis. Both factors would appear to have some utility as markers of early life exposures.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0393-2990
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0393-2990
  • 1573-7284
url: Link


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titleAdult Height and Lung Function as Markers of Life Course Exposures: Associations with Risk Factors and Cause-Specific Mortality
creatorBATTY, G. David ; GUNNELL, David ; LANGENBERG, Claudia ; SMITH, George Davey ; MARMOT, Michael G ; SHIPLEY, Martin J
creatorcontribBATTY, G. David ; GUNNELL, David ; LANGENBERG, Claudia ; SMITH, George Davey ; MARMOT, Michael G ; SHIPLEY, Martin J
descriptionBackground and objective: Pulmonary function and height may be regarded as adult indices of exposures accumulated across the entire life course and in early life, respectively. As such, we hypothesised that pulmonary function would be more strongly related to mortality than height. Studies of the association of height and lung function with mortality -- which are currently modest in number -- will clarify the relative utility of these risk indices and the mechanisms underlying observed patterns of disease risk. Design, setting, and participants: Data were drawn from the Whitehall study, a prospective cohort study of 18,403 middle-aged non-industrial London-based male government employees conducted in the late 1960s. Data were collected on stature, spirometry measures (including forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1]) and a range of covariates. These analyses are based on the 3083 non-smoking men with complete data. Main outcome measures: Mortality ascribed to all-causes, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and site-specific cancers. Results: Both height and FEV1 were associated with a range of physiological, behavioural and socio-economic risk factors. Relations with these risk factors were seen more frequently for FEV1 and, where they occurred, were of somewhat higher magnitude. During a maximum of 35 years follow-up, half the non-smokers had died (n = 1545).$\text{FEV}1\ \text{(HR}_{\text{per}\ \text{one}\ \text{SD}\ \text{increase}};\ 0.89;\ 0.84,\ 0.95)$was somewhat more strongly related to total mortality than height (0.96; 0.91, 1.01) in a fully adjusted model, but this difference did not attain statistical significance at conventional levels (p-value for difference = 0.15). Of the eight independent disease-specific outcomes examined, the only convincing evidence of a differential effect was for deaths from respiratory causes which was unsurprisingly more strongly related to FEV1 than height (p-value for difference = 0.03). Conclusions: In the present study, height and FEV1 were essentially similarly related to both risk factors and mortality outcomes, thus not providing support for our hypothesis. Both factors would appear to have some utility as markers of early life exposures.
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subjectAdults ; Biological and medical sciences ; Body Height ; Cardiovascular diseases ; Cigarette smoking ; Cohort Studies ; Diabetes ; Epidemiology ; Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology ; General aspects ; Health outcomes ; Heart diseases ; Height ; Humans ; Hypotheses ; Lung Diseases - mortality ; Lungs ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; Mortality ; P values ; Pneumology ; Predisposing factors ; Prospective Studies ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Risk Factors
ispartofEuropean journal of epidemiology, 2006, Vol.21 (11), p.795-801
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1GUNNELL, David
2LANGENBERG, Claudia
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0Adult Height and Lung Function as Markers of Life Course Exposures: Associations with Risk Factors and Cause-Specific Mortality
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descriptionBackground and objective: Pulmonary function and height may be regarded as adult indices of exposures accumulated across the entire life course and in early life, respectively. As such, we hypothesised that pulmonary function would be more strongly related to mortality than height. Studies of the association of height and lung function with mortality -- which are currently modest in number -- will clarify the relative utility of these risk indices and the mechanisms underlying observed patterns of disease risk. Design, setting, and participants: Data were drawn from the Whitehall study, a prospective cohort study of 18,403 middle-aged non-industrial London-based male government employees conducted in the late 1960s. Data were collected on stature, spirometry measures (including forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1]) and a range of covariates. These analyses are based on the 3083 non-smoking men with complete data. Main outcome measures: Mortality ascribed to all-causes, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and site-specific cancers. Results: Both height and FEV1 were associated with a range of physiological, behavioural and socio-economic risk factors. Relations with these risk factors were seen more frequently for FEV1 and, where they occurred, were of somewhat higher magnitude. During a maximum of 35 years follow-up, half the non-smokers had died (n = 1545).$\text{FEV}1\ \text{(HR}_{\text{per}\ \text{one}\ \text{SD}\ \text{increase}};\ 0.89;\ 0.84,\ 0.95)$was somewhat more strongly related to total mortality than height (0.96; 0.91, 1.01) in a fully adjusted model, but this difference did not attain statistical significance at conventional levels (p-value for difference = 0.15). Of the eight independent disease-specific outcomes examined, the only convincing evidence of a differential effect was for deaths from respiratory causes which was unsurprisingly more strongly related to FEV1 than height (p-value for difference = 0.03). Conclusions: In the present study, height and FEV1 were essentially similarly related to both risk factors and mortality outcomes, thus not providing support for our hypothesis. Both factors would appear to have some utility as markers of early life exposures.
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1Biological and medical sciences
2Body Height
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5Cohort Studies
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8Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
9General aspects
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28Risk Factors
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titleAdult Height and Lung Function as Markers of Life Course Exposures: Associations with Risk Factors and Cause-Specific Mortality
authorBATTY, G. David ; GUNNELL, David ; LANGENBERG, Claudia ; SMITH, George Davey ; MARMOT, Michael G ; SHIPLEY, Martin J
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abstractBackground and objective: Pulmonary function and height may be regarded as adult indices of exposures accumulated across the entire life course and in early life, respectively. As such, we hypothesised that pulmonary function would be more strongly related to mortality than height. Studies of the association of height and lung function with mortality -- which are currently modest in number -- will clarify the relative utility of these risk indices and the mechanisms underlying observed patterns of disease risk. Design, setting, and participants: Data were drawn from the Whitehall study, a prospective cohort study of 18,403 middle-aged non-industrial London-based male government employees conducted in the late 1960s. Data were collected on stature, spirometry measures (including forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1]) and a range of covariates. These analyses are based on the 3083 non-smoking men with complete data. Main outcome measures: Mortality ascribed to all-causes, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and site-specific cancers. Results: Both height and FEV1 were associated with a range of physiological, behavioural and socio-economic risk factors. Relations with these risk factors were seen more frequently for FEV1 and, where they occurred, were of somewhat higher magnitude. During a maximum of 35 years follow-up, half the non-smokers had died (n = 1545).$\text{FEV}1\ \text{(HR}_{\text{per}\ \text{one}\ \text{SD}\ \text{increase}};\ 0.89;\ 0.84,\ 0.95)$was somewhat more strongly related to total mortality than height (0.96; 0.91, 1.01) in a fully adjusted model, but this difference did not attain statistical significance at conventional levels (p-value for difference = 0.15). Of the eight independent disease-specific outcomes examined, the only convincing evidence of a differential effect was for deaths from respiratory causes which was unsurprisingly more strongly related to FEV1 than height (p-value for difference = 0.03). Conclusions: In the present study, height and FEV1 were essentially similarly related to both risk factors and mortality outcomes, thus not providing support for our hypothesis. Both factors would appear to have some utility as markers of early life exposures.
copDordrecht
pubSpringer
pmid17119881
doi10.1007/s10654-006-9057-2