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SELECTION AND GENETIC (CO)VARIANCE IN BIGHORN SHEEP

Genetic theory predicts that directional selection should deplete additive genetic variance for traits closely related to fitness, and may favor the maintenance of alleles with antagonistically pleiotropic effects on fitness-related traits. Trait heritability is therefore expected to decline with th... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2005, Vol.59 (6), p.1372-1382
Main Author: Coltman, David W.
Other Authors: O'Donoghue, Paul , Hogg, John T. , Festa-Bianchet, Marco
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16050112
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title: SELECTION AND GENETIC (CO)VARIANCE IN BIGHORN SHEEP
format: Article
creator:
  • Coltman, David W.
  • O'Donoghue, Paul
  • Hogg, John T.
  • Festa-Bianchet, Marco
subjects:
  • Age Factors
  • Alberta
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Animals
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Body Weights and Measures
  • Condition
  • Ecological life histories
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Ewes
  • Fertility - genetics
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic correlation
  • Genetic diversity
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic variance
  • Genetic variation
  • Heritability
  • life history
  • Likelihood Functions
  • Ovis canadensis
  • Pedigree
  • Phenotype
  • Phenotypic traits
  • Principal Component Analysis
  • Quantitative Trait, Heritable
  • Reproduction - genetics
  • Selection, Genetic
  • Sheep
  • Sheep - genetics
ispartof: Evolution, 2005, Vol.59 (6), p.1372-1382
description: Genetic theory predicts that directional selection should deplete additive genetic variance for traits closely related to fitness, and may favor the maintenance of alleles with antagonistically pleiotropic effects on fitness-related traits. Trait heritability is therefore expected to decline with the degree of association with fitness, and some genetic correlations between selected traits are expected to be negative. Here we demonstrate a negative relationship between trait heritability and association with lifetime reproductive success in a wild population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) at Ram Mountain, Alberta, Canada. Lower heritability for fitness-related traits, however, was not wholly a consequence of declining genetic variance, because those traits showed high levels of residual variance. Genetic correlations estimated between pairs of traits with significant heritability were positive. Principal component analyses suggest that positive relationships between morphometric traits constitute the main axis of genetic variation. Trade-offs in the form of negative genetic or phenotypic correlations among the traits we have measured do not appear to constrain the potential for evolution in this population.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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titleSELECTION AND GENETIC (CO)VARIANCE IN BIGHORN SHEEP
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descriptionGenetic theory predicts that directional selection should deplete additive genetic variance for traits closely related to fitness, and may favor the maintenance of alleles with antagonistically pleiotropic effects on fitness-related traits. Trait heritability is therefore expected to decline with the degree of association with fitness, and some genetic correlations between selected traits are expected to be negative. Here we demonstrate a negative relationship between trait heritability and association with lifetime reproductive success in a wild population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) at Ram Mountain, Alberta, Canada. Lower heritability for fitness-related traits, however, was not wholly a consequence of declining genetic variance, because those traits showed high levels of residual variance. Genetic correlations estimated between pairs of traits with significant heritability were positive. Principal component analyses suggest that positive relationships between morphometric traits constitute the main axis of genetic variation. Trade-offs in the form of negative genetic or phenotypic correlations among the traits we have measured do not appear to constrain the potential for evolution in this population.
editionReceived March 1, 2004. Accepted March 22, 2005.
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subjectAge Factors ; Alberta ; Analysis of Variance ; Animals ; Bighorn sheep ; Body Weights and Measures ; Condition ; Ecological life histories ; Evolution ; Evolutionary genetics ; Ewes ; Fertility - genetics ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic correlation ; Genetic diversity ; Genetic research ; Genetic variance ; Genetic variation ; Heritability ; life history ; Likelihood Functions ; Ovis canadensis ; Pedigree ; Phenotype ; Phenotypic traits ; Principal Component Analysis ; Quantitative Trait, Heritable ; Reproduction - genetics ; Selection, Genetic ; Sheep ; Sheep - genetics
ispartofEvolution, 2005, Vol.59 (6), p.1372-1382
rightsCopyright 2005 The Society for the Study of Evolution
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abstractGenetic theory predicts that directional selection should deplete additive genetic variance for traits closely related to fitness, and may favor the maintenance of alleles with antagonistically pleiotropic effects on fitness-related traits. Trait heritability is therefore expected to decline with the degree of association with fitness, and some genetic correlations between selected traits are expected to be negative. Here we demonstrate a negative relationship between trait heritability and association with lifetime reproductive success in a wild population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) at Ram Mountain, Alberta, Canada. Lower heritability for fitness-related traits, however, was not wholly a consequence of declining genetic variance, because those traits showed high levels of residual variance. Genetic correlations estimated between pairs of traits with significant heritability were positive. Principal component analyses suggest that positive relationships between morphometric traits constitute the main axis of genetic variation. Trade-offs in the form of negative genetic or phenotypic correlations among the traits we have measured do not appear to constrain the potential for evolution in this population.
copOxford, UK
pubBlackwell Publishing Ltd
pmid16050112
doi10.1111/j.0014-3820.2005.tb01786.x
tpages11
editionReceived March 1, 2004. Accepted March 22, 2005.