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Heart Failure Incidence and Survival (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study)

Heart failure (HF) is increasing in prevalence in the United States. Little data exists on race and gender differences in HF incidence rates and case fatality. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort is a population-based study from 4 United States communities (1987 to 2002). Prevalent... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of cardiology 2008, Vol.101 (7), p.1016-1022
Main Author: Loehr, Laura R., MD, MS
Other Authors: Rosamond, Wayne D., PhD , Chang, Patricia P., MD, MHS , Folsom, Aaron R., MD, MPH , Chambless, Lloyd E., PhD
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, NY: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0002-9149
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_68562909
title: Heart Failure Incidence and Survival (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study)
format: Article
creator:
  • Loehr, Laura R., MD, MS
  • Rosamond, Wayne D., PhD
  • Chang, Patricia P., MD, MHS
  • Folsom, Aaron R., MD, MPH
  • Chambless, Lloyd E., PhD
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • African Americans
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Atherosclerosis (general aspects, experimental research)
  • Atherosclerosis - complications
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Blood and lymphatic vessels
  • Cardiology. Vascular system
  • Cardiovascular
  • Disease-Free Survival
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Female
  • Gender differences
  • Heart
  • Heart failure
  • Heart Failure - epidemiology
  • Heart Failure - ethnology
  • Heart Failure - etiology
  • Heart Failure - mortality
  • Heart failure, cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac enlargement
  • Hospitalization
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Kaplan-Meier Estimate
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Mortality
  • Prevalence
  • Risk factors
  • Sex Factors
  • White people
  • Women
ispartof: The American journal of cardiology, 2008, Vol.101 (7), p.1016-1022
description: Heart failure (HF) is increasing in prevalence in the United States. Little data exists on race and gender differences in HF incidence rates and case fatality. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort is a population-based study from 4 United States communities (1987 to 2002). Prevalent HF cases (n = 750) were identified by self-report and were excluded. Incident HF was defined by the International Classification of Diseases codes for HF (428.0 to 428.9, I50) from a hospitalization (n = 1,206) or death certificate (n = 76). There were 1,282 incident HF cases over 198,417 person-years. The age-adjusted incidence rate (per 1,000 person-years) for Caucasian women, 3.4, was significantly less compared with all other groups (Caucasian men, 6.0; African-American women, 8.1; African-American men, 9.1). Age-adjusted HF incidence rates were greater for African-Americans than Caucasians, but adjustment for confounders attenuated the difference. The adjusted African-American-to-Caucasian hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 1.06) for men, and similarly, 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 1.90) for women during the second half of follow-up. The hazard ratio for women during the first half of follow-up was 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 2.55). Thirty-day, 1-year, and 5-year case fatalities following hospitalization for HF were 10.4%, 22%, and 42.3%, respectively. African-Americans had a greater 5-year case fatality compared with Caucasians (p
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9149
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-9149
  • 1879-1913
url: Link


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titleHeart Failure Incidence and Survival (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study)
creatorLoehr, Laura R., MD, MS ; Rosamond, Wayne D., PhD ; Chang, Patricia P., MD, MHS ; Folsom, Aaron R., MD, MPH ; Chambless, Lloyd E., PhD
creatorcontribLoehr, Laura R., MD, MS ; Rosamond, Wayne D., PhD ; Chang, Patricia P., MD, MHS ; Folsom, Aaron R., MD, MPH ; Chambless, Lloyd E., PhD
descriptionHeart failure (HF) is increasing in prevalence in the United States. Little data exists on race and gender differences in HF incidence rates and case fatality. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort is a population-based study from 4 United States communities (1987 to 2002). Prevalent HF cases (n = 750) were identified by self-report and were excluded. Incident HF was defined by the International Classification of Diseases codes for HF (428.0 to 428.9, I50) from a hospitalization (n = 1,206) or death certificate (n = 76). There were 1,282 incident HF cases over 198,417 person-years. The age-adjusted incidence rate (per 1,000 person-years) for Caucasian women, 3.4, was significantly less compared with all other groups (Caucasian men, 6.0; African-American women, 8.1; African-American men, 9.1). Age-adjusted HF incidence rates were greater for African-Americans than Caucasians, but adjustment for confounders attenuated the difference. The adjusted African-American-to-Caucasian hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 1.06) for men, and similarly, 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 1.90) for women during the second half of follow-up. The hazard ratio for women during the first half of follow-up was 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 2.55). Thirty-day, 1-year, and 5-year case fatalities following hospitalization for HF were 10.4%, 22%, and 42.3%, respectively. African-Americans had a greater 5-year case fatality compared with Caucasians (p <0.05). In conclusion, heart failure incidence rates in African-American women were more similar to those of men than of Caucasian women. The greater HF incidence in African-Americans than in Caucasians is largely explained by African-Americans’ greater levels of atherosclerotic risk factors.
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publisherNew York, NY: Elsevier Inc
subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; African Americans ; Atherosclerosis ; Atherosclerosis (general aspects, experimental research) ; Atherosclerosis - complications ; Biological and medical sciences ; Blood and lymphatic vessels ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Cardiovascular ; Disease-Free Survival ; European Continental Ancestry Group ; Female ; Gender differences ; Heart ; Heart failure ; Heart Failure - epidemiology ; Heart Failure - ethnology ; Heart Failure - etiology ; Heart Failure - mortality ; Heart failure, cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac enlargement ; Hospitalization ; Humans ; Incidence ; Kaplan-Meier Estimate ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Mortality ; Prevalence ; Risk factors ; Sex Factors ; White people ; Women
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1Rosamond, Wayne D., PhD
2Chang, Patricia P., MD, MHS
3Folsom, Aaron R., MD, MPH
4Chambless, Lloyd E., PhD
title
0Heart Failure Incidence and Survival (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study)
1The American journal of cardiology
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descriptionHeart failure (HF) is increasing in prevalence in the United States. Little data exists on race and gender differences in HF incidence rates and case fatality. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort is a population-based study from 4 United States communities (1987 to 2002). Prevalent HF cases (n = 750) were identified by self-report and were excluded. Incident HF was defined by the International Classification of Diseases codes for HF (428.0 to 428.9, I50) from a hospitalization (n = 1,206) or death certificate (n = 76). There were 1,282 incident HF cases over 198,417 person-years. The age-adjusted incidence rate (per 1,000 person-years) for Caucasian women, 3.4, was significantly less compared with all other groups (Caucasian men, 6.0; African-American women, 8.1; African-American men, 9.1). Age-adjusted HF incidence rates were greater for African-Americans than Caucasians, but adjustment for confounders attenuated the difference. The adjusted African-American-to-Caucasian hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 1.06) for men, and similarly, 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 1.90) for women during the second half of follow-up. The hazard ratio for women during the first half of follow-up was 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 2.55). Thirty-day, 1-year, and 5-year case fatalities following hospitalization for HF were 10.4%, 22%, and 42.3%, respectively. African-Americans had a greater 5-year case fatality compared with Caucasians (p <0.05). In conclusion, heart failure incidence rates in African-American women were more similar to those of men than of Caucasian women. The greater HF incidence in African-Americans than in Caucasians is largely explained by African-Americans’ greater levels of atherosclerotic risk factors.
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0Abridged Index Medicus
1African Americans
2Atherosclerosis
3Atherosclerosis (general aspects, experimental research)
4Atherosclerosis - complications
5Biological and medical sciences
6Blood and lymphatic vessels
7Cardiology. Vascular system
8Cardiovascular
9Disease-Free Survival
10European Continental Ancestry Group
11Female
12Gender differences
13Heart
14Heart failure
15Heart Failure - epidemiology
16Heart Failure - ethnology
17Heart Failure - etiology
18Heart Failure - mortality
19Heart failure, cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac enlargement
20Hospitalization
21Humans
22Incidence
23Kaplan-Meier Estimate
24Male
25Medical sciences
26Middle Aged
27Mortality
28Prevalence
29Risk factors
30Sex Factors
31White people
32Women
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titleHeart Failure Incidence and Survival (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study)
authorLoehr, Laura R., MD, MS ; Rosamond, Wayne D., PhD ; Chang, Patricia P., MD, MHS ; Folsom, Aaron R., MD, MPH ; Chambless, Lloyd E., PhD
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0Abridged Index Medicus
1African Americans
2Atherosclerosis
3Atherosclerosis (general aspects, experimental research)
4Atherosclerosis - complications
5Biological and medical sciences
6Blood and lymphatic vessels
7Cardiology. Vascular system
8Cardiovascular
9Disease-Free Survival
10European Continental Ancestry Group
11Female
12Gender differences
13Heart
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16Heart Failure - ethnology
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18Heart Failure - mortality
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28Prevalence
29Risk factors
30Sex Factors
31White people
32Women
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abstractHeart failure (HF) is increasing in prevalence in the United States. Little data exists on race and gender differences in HF incidence rates and case fatality. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort is a population-based study from 4 United States communities (1987 to 2002). Prevalent HF cases (n = 750) were identified by self-report and were excluded. Incident HF was defined by the International Classification of Diseases codes for HF (428.0 to 428.9, I50) from a hospitalization (n = 1,206) or death certificate (n = 76). There were 1,282 incident HF cases over 198,417 person-years. The age-adjusted incidence rate (per 1,000 person-years) for Caucasian women, 3.4, was significantly less compared with all other groups (Caucasian men, 6.0; African-American women, 8.1; African-American men, 9.1). Age-adjusted HF incidence rates were greater for African-Americans than Caucasians, but adjustment for confounders attenuated the difference. The adjusted African-American-to-Caucasian hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 1.06) for men, and similarly, 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.46 to 1.90) for women during the second half of follow-up. The hazard ratio for women during the first half of follow-up was 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 2.55). Thirty-day, 1-year, and 5-year case fatalities following hospitalization for HF were 10.4%, 22%, and 42.3%, respectively. African-Americans had a greater 5-year case fatality compared with Caucasians (p <0.05). In conclusion, heart failure incidence rates in African-American women were more similar to those of men than of Caucasian women. The greater HF incidence in African-Americans than in Caucasians is largely explained by African-Americans’ greater levels of atherosclerotic risk factors.
copNew York, NY
pubElsevier Inc
pmid18359324
doi10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.11.061