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BREAKDOWN OF SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY IN THE PERENNIAL ARABIDOPSIS LYRATA (BRASSICACEAE) AND ITS GENETIC CONSEQUENCES

Mating systems in plants are known to be highly labile traits, with frequent transitions from outcrossing to selfing. The genetic basis for breakdown in self-incompatibility (SI) systems has been studied, but data on variation in selfing rates in species for which the molecular basis of SI is known... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2005, Vol.59 (7), p.1437-1448
Main Author: Mable, Barbara K.
Other Authors: Dart, Alexander V. RobertsonSara , Berardo, Christina Di , Witham, Laura
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
SRK
Publisher: Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16153030
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title: BREAKDOWN OF SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY IN THE PERENNIAL ARABIDOPSIS LYRATA (BRASSICACEAE) AND ITS GENETIC CONSEQUENCES
format: Article
creator:
  • Mable, Barbara K.
  • Dart, Alexander V. RobertsonSara
  • Berardo, Christina Di
  • Witham, Laura
subjects:
  • Alleles
  • Analysis
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Arabidopsis - genetics
  • Arabidopsis - physiology
  • Arabidopsis lyrata
  • Biological diversity
  • Biological Evolution
  • Courtship of animals
  • Cruciferae
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Flowers & plants
  • Gene Frequency
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic diversity
  • Genetic loci
  • Genetic research
  • Genetics, Population
  • Genotype
  • heterozygosity
  • Heterozygote
  • Inbreeding
  • Likelihood Functions
  • mating system variation
  • Mating systems
  • Michigan
  • Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
  • Microsatellites
  • Models, Genetic
  • Ontario
  • Plant Proteins - genetics
  • Plant reproduction
  • Plants
  • Population distributions
  • Population genetics
  • Protein Kinases - genetics
  • self-in compatibiliy breakdown
  • SRK
  • Studies
ispartof: Evolution, 2005, Vol.59 (7), p.1437-1448
description: Mating systems in plants are known to be highly labile traits, with frequent transitions from outcrossing to selfing. The genetic basis for breakdown in self-incompatibility (SI) systems has been studied, but data on variation in selfing rates in species for which the molecular basis of SI is known are rare. This study surveyed such variation in Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae), which is often considered an obligately outcrossing species, to examine the causes and genetic consequences of changes in its breeding system. Based on controlled self-pollinations in the greenhouse, three populations from the Great Lakes region of North America included a minority of self-compatible (SC) individuals, while two showed larger proportions of SC individuals and all populations contained some individuals capable of setting selfed seeds. Loss of SI was not associated with particular haplotypes at the S-locus (as estimated by alleles amplified at the SRK locus, the gene controlling female specificity) and all populations contained similar numbers of SRK alleles, suggesting that some other genetic factor is responsible for modifying the SI reaction. The loss of SI has resulted in an effective shift in the mating system, as the two populations with a high frequency of SC individuals showed significantly lower microsatellite-based multilocus outcrossing rates and higher inbreeding coefficients than the other populations. Based on microsatellites, observed heterozygosities and genetic diversity were also significantly depressed in these populations. These findings provide the unique opportunity to examine in detail the consequences of mating system changes within a species with a well-characterized SI system.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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titleBREAKDOWN OF SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY IN THE PERENNIAL ARABIDOPSIS LYRATA (BRASSICACEAE) AND ITS GENETIC CONSEQUENCES
creatorMable, Barbara K. ; Dart, Alexander V. RobertsonSara ; Berardo, Christina Di ; Witham, Laura
creatorcontribMable, Barbara K. ; Dart, Alexander V. RobertsonSara ; Berardo, Christina Di ; Witham, Laura
descriptionMating systems in plants are known to be highly labile traits, with frequent transitions from outcrossing to selfing. The genetic basis for breakdown in self-incompatibility (SI) systems has been studied, but data on variation in selfing rates in species for which the molecular basis of SI is known are rare. This study surveyed such variation in Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae), which is often considered an obligately outcrossing species, to examine the causes and genetic consequences of changes in its breeding system. Based on controlled self-pollinations in the greenhouse, three populations from the Great Lakes region of North America included a minority of self-compatible (SC) individuals, while two showed larger proportions of SC individuals and all populations contained some individuals capable of setting selfed seeds. Loss of SI was not associated with particular haplotypes at the S-locus (as estimated by alleles amplified at the SRK locus, the gene controlling female specificity) and all populations contained similar numbers of SRK alleles, suggesting that some other genetic factor is responsible for modifying the SI reaction. The loss of SI has resulted in an effective shift in the mating system, as the two populations with a high frequency of SC individuals showed significantly lower microsatellite-based multilocus outcrossing rates and higher inbreeding coefficients than the other populations. Based on microsatellites, observed heterozygosities and genetic diversity were also significantly depressed in these populations. These findings provide the unique opportunity to examine in detail the consequences of mating system changes within a species with a well-characterized SI system.
editionReceived January 5, 2005. Accepted April 21, 2005.
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subjectAlleles ; Analysis ; Analysis of Variance ; Arabidopsis - genetics ; Arabidopsis - physiology ; Arabidopsis lyrata ; Biological diversity ; Biological Evolution ; Courtship of animals ; Cruciferae ; Evolution ; Evolutionary biology ; Evolutionary genetics ; Flowers & plants ; Gene Frequency ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic diversity ; Genetic loci ; Genetic research ; Genetics, Population ; Genotype ; heterozygosity ; Heterozygote ; Inbreeding ; Likelihood Functions ; mating system variation ; Mating systems ; Michigan ; Microsatellite Repeats - genetics ; Microsatellites ; Models, Genetic ; Ontario ; Plant Proteins - genetics ; Plant reproduction ; Plants ; Population distributions ; Population genetics ; Protein Kinases - genetics ; self-in compatibiliy breakdown ; SRK ; Studies
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descriptionMating systems in plants are known to be highly labile traits, with frequent transitions from outcrossing to selfing. The genetic basis for breakdown in self-incompatibility (SI) systems has been studied, but data on variation in selfing rates in species for which the molecular basis of SI is known are rare. This study surveyed such variation in Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae), which is often considered an obligately outcrossing species, to examine the causes and genetic consequences of changes in its breeding system. Based on controlled self-pollinations in the greenhouse, three populations from the Great Lakes region of North America included a minority of self-compatible (SC) individuals, while two showed larger proportions of SC individuals and all populations contained some individuals capable of setting selfed seeds. Loss of SI was not associated with particular haplotypes at the S-locus (as estimated by alleles amplified at the SRK locus, the gene controlling female specificity) and all populations contained similar numbers of SRK alleles, suggesting that some other genetic factor is responsible for modifying the SI reaction. The loss of SI has resulted in an effective shift in the mating system, as the two populations with a high frequency of SC individuals showed significantly lower microsatellite-based multilocus outcrossing rates and higher inbreeding coefficients than the other populations. Based on microsatellites, observed heterozygosities and genetic diversity were also significantly depressed in these populations. These findings provide the unique opportunity to examine in detail the consequences of mating system changes within a species with a well-characterized SI system.
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titleBREAKDOWN OF SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY IN THE PERENNIAL ARABIDOPSIS LYRATA (BRASSICACEAE) AND ITS GENETIC CONSEQUENCES
authorMable, Barbara K. ; Dart, Alexander V. RobertsonSara ; Berardo, Christina Di ; Witham, Laura
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4Arabidopsis - physiology
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7Biological Evolution
8Courtship of animals
9Cruciferae
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15Genetic aspects
16Genetic diversity
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30Models, Genetic
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32Plant Proteins - genetics
33Plant reproduction
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35Population distributions
36Population genetics
37Protein Kinases - genetics
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3b.mable@bio.gla.ac.uk.
4Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Graham Kerr Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, United Kingdom; E‐mail
5Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada.
abstractMating systems in plants are known to be highly labile traits, with frequent transitions from outcrossing to selfing. The genetic basis for breakdown in self-incompatibility (SI) systems has been studied, but data on variation in selfing rates in species for which the molecular basis of SI is known are rare. This study surveyed such variation in Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae), which is often considered an obligately outcrossing species, to examine the causes and genetic consequences of changes in its breeding system. Based on controlled self-pollinations in the greenhouse, three populations from the Great Lakes region of North America included a minority of self-compatible (SC) individuals, while two showed larger proportions of SC individuals and all populations contained some individuals capable of setting selfed seeds. Loss of SI was not associated with particular haplotypes at the S-locus (as estimated by alleles amplified at the SRK locus, the gene controlling female specificity) and all populations contained similar numbers of SRK alleles, suggesting that some other genetic factor is responsible for modifying the SI reaction. The loss of SI has resulted in an effective shift in the mating system, as the two populations with a high frequency of SC individuals showed significantly lower microsatellite-based multilocus outcrossing rates and higher inbreeding coefficients than the other populations. Based on microsatellites, observed heterozygosities and genetic diversity were also significantly depressed in these populations. These findings provide the unique opportunity to examine in detail the consequences of mating system changes within a species with a well-characterized SI system.
copOxford, UK
pubBlackwell Publishing Ltd
pmid16153030
doi10.1111/j.0014-3820.2005.tb01794.x
tpages12
editionReceived January 5, 2005. Accepted April 21, 2005.
oafree_for_read