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The prevalence of plant food allergies: A systematic review

Background There is uncertainty regarding the prevalence of allergies to plant food. Objective To assess the prevalence of allergies to plant food according to the different subjective and objective assessment methods. Methods Our systematic search of population-based studies (since 1990) in the lit... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 2008, Vol.121 (5), p.1210-1218.e4
Main Author: Zuidmeer, Laurian, PhD
Other Authors: Goldhahn, Klaus, MD , Rona, Roberto J., FFPH , Gislason, David, MD , Madsen, Charlotte, DVM , Summers, Colin, BSc , Sodergren, Eva, PhD , Dahlstrom, Jorgen, PhD , Lindner, Titia, MD , Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T., MD , McBride, Doreen, MBA , Keil, Thomas, MD
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
soy
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: New York, NY: Mosby, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0091-6749
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_69189374
title: The prevalence of plant food allergies: A systematic review
format: Article
creator:
  • Zuidmeer, Laurian, PhD
  • Goldhahn, Klaus, MD
  • Rona, Roberto J., FFPH
  • Gislason, David, MD
  • Madsen, Charlotte, DVM
  • Summers, Colin, BSc
  • Sodergren, Eva, PhD
  • Dahlstrom, Jorgen, PhD
  • Lindner, Titia, MD
  • Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T., MD
  • McBride, Doreen, MBA
  • Keil, Thomas, MD
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Adult
  • Allergic diseases
  • Allergy and Immunology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cereal
  • Child
  • Digestive allergic diseases
  • EuroPrevall
  • Fertilizer industry
  • Fertilizers
  • Food allergy
  • food hypersensitivity
  • Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
  • fruit
  • Fruit - adverse effects
  • Fruit - immunology
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Fundamental immunology
  • Humans
  • Immunopathology
  • Medical sciences
  • meta-analysis
  • nuts
  • Nuts - adverse effects
  • Nuts - immunology
  • Plants - adverse effects
  • Plants - immunology
  • Prevalence
  • Sarcoidosis. Granulomatous diseases of unproved etiology. Connective tissue diseases. Elastic tissue diseases. Vasculitis
  • seeds
  • soy
  • vegetables
  • Vegetables - adverse effects
  • Vegetables - immunology
  • wheat
ispartof: Journal of allergy and clinical immunology, 2008, Vol.121 (5), p.1210-1218.e4
description: Background There is uncertainty regarding the prevalence of allergies to plant food. Objective To assess the prevalence of allergies to plant food according to the different subjective and objective assessment methods. Methods Our systematic search of population-based studies (since 1990) in the literature database MEDLINE focused on fruits, vegetables/legumes, tree nuts, wheat, soy, cereals, and seeds. Prevalence estimates were categorized by food item and method used (food challenges, skin prick test, serum IgE, parent/self-reported symptoms), complemented by appropriate meta-analyses. Results We included 36 studies with data from a total of over 250,000 children and adults. Only 6 studies included food challenge tests with prevalences ranging from 0.1% to 4.3% each for fruits and tree nuts, 0.1% to 1.4% for vegetables, and
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0091-6749
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0091-6749
  • 1097-6825
url: Link


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titleThe prevalence of plant food allergies: A systematic review
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creatorZuidmeer, Laurian, PhD ; Goldhahn, Klaus, MD ; Rona, Roberto J., FFPH ; Gislason, David, MD ; Madsen, Charlotte, DVM ; Summers, Colin, BSc ; Sodergren, Eva, PhD ; Dahlstrom, Jorgen, PhD ; Lindner, Titia, MD ; Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T., MD ; McBride, Doreen, MBA ; Keil, Thomas, MD
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descriptionBackground There is uncertainty regarding the prevalence of allergies to plant food. Objective To assess the prevalence of allergies to plant food according to the different subjective and objective assessment methods. Methods Our systematic search of population-based studies (since 1990) in the literature database MEDLINE focused on fruits, vegetables/legumes, tree nuts, wheat, soy, cereals, and seeds. Prevalence estimates were categorized by food item and method used (food challenges, skin prick test, serum IgE, parent/self-reported symptoms), complemented by appropriate meta-analyses. Results We included 36 studies with data from a total of over 250,000 children and adults. Only 6 studies included food challenge tests with prevalences ranging from 0.1% to 4.3% each for fruits and tree nuts, 0.1% to 1.4% for vegetables, and <1% each for wheat, soy, and sesame. The prevalence of sensitization against any specific plant food item assessed by skin prick test was usually <1%, whereas sensitization assessed by IgE against wheat ranged as high as 3.6% and against soy as high as 2.9%. For fruit and vegetables, prevalences based on perception were generally higher than those based on sensitization, but for wheat and soy in adults, sensitization was higher. Meta-analyses showed significant heterogeneity between studies regardless of food item or age group. Conclusion Population-based prevalence estimates for allergies to plant products determined by the diagnostic gold standard are scarce. There was considerable heterogeneity in the prevalence estimates of sensitization or perceived allergic reactions to plant food.
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subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Adult ; Allergic diseases ; Allergy and Immunology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cereal ; Child ; Digestive allergic diseases ; EuroPrevall ; Fertilizer industry ; Fertilizers ; Food allergy ; food hypersensitivity ; Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology ; fruit ; Fruit - adverse effects ; Fruit - immunology ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Fundamental immunology ; Humans ; Immunopathology ; Medical sciences ; meta-analysis ; nuts ; Nuts - adverse effects ; Nuts - immunology ; Plants - adverse effects ; Plants - immunology ; Prevalence ; Sarcoidosis. Granulomatous diseases of unproved etiology. Connective tissue diseases. Elastic tissue diseases. Vasculitis ; seeds ; soy ; vegetables ; Vegetables - adverse effects ; Vegetables - immunology ; wheat
ispartofJournal of allergy and clinical immunology, 2008, Vol.121 (5), p.1210-1218.e4
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1Goldhahn, Klaus, MD
2Rona, Roberto J., FFPH
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4Madsen, Charlotte, DVM
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6Sodergren, Eva, PhD
7Dahlstrom, Jorgen, PhD
8Lindner, Titia, MD
9Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T., MD
10McBride, Doreen, MBA
11Keil, Thomas, MD
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descriptionBackground There is uncertainty regarding the prevalence of allergies to plant food. Objective To assess the prevalence of allergies to plant food according to the different subjective and objective assessment methods. Methods Our systematic search of population-based studies (since 1990) in the literature database MEDLINE focused on fruits, vegetables/legumes, tree nuts, wheat, soy, cereals, and seeds. Prevalence estimates were categorized by food item and method used (food challenges, skin prick test, serum IgE, parent/self-reported symptoms), complemented by appropriate meta-analyses. Results We included 36 studies with data from a total of over 250,000 children and adults. Only 6 studies included food challenge tests with prevalences ranging from 0.1% to 4.3% each for fruits and tree nuts, 0.1% to 1.4% for vegetables, and <1% each for wheat, soy, and sesame. The prevalence of sensitization against any specific plant food item assessed by skin prick test was usually <1%, whereas sensitization assessed by IgE against wheat ranged as high as 3.6% and against soy as high as 2.9%. For fruit and vegetables, prevalences based on perception were generally higher than those based on sensitization, but for wheat and soy in adults, sensitization was higher. Meta-analyses showed significant heterogeneity between studies regardless of food item or age group. Conclusion Population-based prevalence estimates for allergies to plant products determined by the diagnostic gold standard are scarce. There was considerable heterogeneity in the prevalence estimates of sensitization or perceived allergic reactions to plant food.
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1Adult
2Allergic diseases
3Allergy and Immunology
4Biological and medical sciences
5Cereal
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8EuroPrevall
9Fertilizer industry
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12food hypersensitivity
13Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
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34Vegetables - immunology
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titleThe prevalence of plant food allergies: A systematic review
authorZuidmeer, Laurian, PhD ; Goldhahn, Klaus, MD ; Rona, Roberto J., FFPH ; Gislason, David, MD ; Madsen, Charlotte, DVM ; Summers, Colin, BSc ; Sodergren, Eva, PhD ; Dahlstrom, Jorgen, PhD ; Lindner, Titia, MD ; Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T., MD ; McBride, Doreen, MBA ; Keil, Thomas, MD
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abstractBackground There is uncertainty regarding the prevalence of allergies to plant food. Objective To assess the prevalence of allergies to plant food according to the different subjective and objective assessment methods. Methods Our systematic search of population-based studies (since 1990) in the literature database MEDLINE focused on fruits, vegetables/legumes, tree nuts, wheat, soy, cereals, and seeds. Prevalence estimates were categorized by food item and method used (food challenges, skin prick test, serum IgE, parent/self-reported symptoms), complemented by appropriate meta-analyses. Results We included 36 studies with data from a total of over 250,000 children and adults. Only 6 studies included food challenge tests with prevalences ranging from 0.1% to 4.3% each for fruits and tree nuts, 0.1% to 1.4% for vegetables, and <1% each for wheat, soy, and sesame. The prevalence of sensitization against any specific plant food item assessed by skin prick test was usually <1%, whereas sensitization assessed by IgE against wheat ranged as high as 3.6% and against soy as high as 2.9%. For fruit and vegetables, prevalences based on perception were generally higher than those based on sensitization, but for wheat and soy in adults, sensitization was higher. Meta-analyses showed significant heterogeneity between studies regardless of food item or age group. Conclusion Population-based prevalence estimates for allergies to plant products determined by the diagnostic gold standard are scarce. There was considerable heterogeneity in the prevalence estimates of sensitization or perceived allergic reactions to plant food.
copNew York, NY
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pmid18378288
doi10.1016/j.jaci.2008.02.019