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Tree Diversity, Composition, Forest Structure and Aboveground Biomass Dynamics after Single and Repeated Fire in a Bornean Rain Forest

Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO₂. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent... Full description

Journal Title: Oecologia 2008-12-01, Vol.158 (3), p.579-588
Main Author: Slik, J.W.F
Other Authors: Bernard, C.S , Beek, van, M , Breman, F.C , Eichhorn, K.A.O
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0029-8549
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_69790714
title: Tree Diversity, Composition, Forest Structure and Aboveground Biomass Dynamics after Single and Repeated Fire in a Bornean Rain Forest
format: Article
creator:
  • Slik, J.W.F
  • Bernard, C.S
  • Beek, van, M
  • Breman, F.C
  • Eichhorn, K.A.O
subjects:
  • Aboveground biomass
  • amazonian forests
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Borneo
  • Burned forest regeneration
  • Conservation Ecology - Original Paper
  • Conservation Ecology - Original Papers
  • east kalimantan
  • Ecology
  • Ecosystem
  • El Nino drought
  • Fire damage
  • Fires
  • Forest canopy
  • Forest fires
  • Forest regeneration
  • Forest succession
  • Forestry
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General aspects
  • General forest ecology
  • Generalities. Production, biomass. Quality of wood and forest products. General forest ecology
  • Hydrology/Water Resources
  • indonesia
  • Life Sciences
  • Old growth forests
  • Pioneer species
  • Plant Sciences
  • Recruitment
  • responses
  • restoration
  • species composition
  • Trees
  • Tropical Climate
  • Tropical forests
  • Tropical rain forests
  • Understory
  • vegetation
  • wood density
ispartof: Oecologia, 2008-12-01, Vol.158 (3), p.579-588
description: Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO₂. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent decades, however, tropical forest fires occur more frequently and at larger spatial scales than they used to. We studied forest structure, tree species diversity, tree species composition, and aboveground biomass during the first 7 years since fire in unburned, once burned and twice burned forest of eastern Borneo to determine the rate of recovery of these forests. We paid special attention to changes in the tree species composition during burned forest regeneration because we expect the long-term recovery of aboveground biomass and ecosystem functions in burned forests to largely depend on the successful regeneration of the prefire, heavy-wood, species composition. We found that forest structure (canopy openness, leaf area index, herb cover, and stem density) is strongly affected by fire but shows quick recovery. However, species composition shows no or limited recovery and aboveground biomass, which is greatly reduced by fire, continues to be low or decline up to 7 years after fire. Consequently, large amounts of the C released to the atmosphere by fire will not be recaptured by the burned forest ecosystem in the near future. We also observed that repeated fire, with an inter-fire interval of 15 years, does not necessarily lead to a huge deterioration in the regeneration potential of tropical forest. We conclude that burned forests are valuable and should be conserved and that long-term monitoring programs in secondary forests are necessary to determine their recovery rates, especially in relation to aboveground biomass accumulation.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-8549
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-8549
  • 1432-1939
url: Link


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titleTree Diversity, Composition, Forest Structure and Aboveground Biomass Dynamics after Single and Repeated Fire in a Bornean Rain Forest
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descriptionForest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO₂. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent decades, however, tropical forest fires occur more frequently and at larger spatial scales than they used to. We studied forest structure, tree species diversity, tree species composition, and aboveground biomass during the first 7 years since fire in unburned, once burned and twice burned forest of eastern Borneo to determine the rate of recovery of these forests. We paid special attention to changes in the tree species composition during burned forest regeneration because we expect the long-term recovery of aboveground biomass and ecosystem functions in burned forests to largely depend on the successful regeneration of the prefire, heavy-wood, species composition. We found that forest structure (canopy openness, leaf area index, herb cover, and stem density) is strongly affected by fire but shows quick recovery. However, species composition shows no or limited recovery and aboveground biomass, which is greatly reduced by fire, continues to be low or decline up to 7 years after fire. Consequently, large amounts of the C released to the atmosphere by fire will not be recaptured by the burned forest ecosystem in the near future. We also observed that repeated fire, with an inter-fire interval of 15 years, does not necessarily lead to a huge deterioration in the regeneration potential of tropical forest. We conclude that burned forests are valuable and should be conserved and that long-term monitoring programs in secondary forests are necessary to determine their recovery rates, especially in relation to aboveground biomass accumulation.
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subjectAboveground biomass ; amazonian forests ; Animal and plant ecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biodiversity ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Borneo ; Burned forest regeneration ; Conservation Ecology - Original Paper ; Conservation Ecology - Original Papers ; east kalimantan ; Ecology ; Ecosystem ; El Nino drought ; Fire damage ; Fires ; Forest canopy ; Forest fires ; Forest regeneration ; Forest succession ; Forestry ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General aspects ; General forest ecology ; Generalities. Production, biomass. Quality of wood and forest products. General forest ecology ; Hydrology/Water Resources ; indonesia ; Life Sciences ; Old growth forests ; Pioneer species ; Plant Sciences ; Recruitment ; responses ; restoration ; species composition ; Trees ; Tropical Climate ; Tropical forests ; Tropical rain forests ; Understory ; vegetation ; wood density
ispartofOecologia, 2008-12-01, Vol.158 (3), p.579-588
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descriptionForest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO₂. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent decades, however, tropical forest fires occur more frequently and at larger spatial scales than they used to. We studied forest structure, tree species diversity, tree species composition, and aboveground biomass during the first 7 years since fire in unburned, once burned and twice burned forest of eastern Borneo to determine the rate of recovery of these forests. We paid special attention to changes in the tree species composition during burned forest regeneration because we expect the long-term recovery of aboveground biomass and ecosystem functions in burned forests to largely depend on the successful regeneration of the prefire, heavy-wood, species composition. We found that forest structure (canopy openness, leaf area index, herb cover, and stem density) is strongly affected by fire but shows quick recovery. However, species composition shows no or limited recovery and aboveground biomass, which is greatly reduced by fire, continues to be low or decline up to 7 years after fire. Consequently, large amounts of the C released to the atmosphere by fire will not be recaptured by the burned forest ecosystem in the near future. We also observed that repeated fire, with an inter-fire interval of 15 years, does not necessarily lead to a huge deterioration in the regeneration potential of tropical forest. We conclude that burned forests are valuable and should be conserved and that long-term monitoring programs in secondary forests are necessary to determine their recovery rates, especially in relation to aboveground biomass accumulation.
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0Aboveground biomass
1amazonian forests
2Animal and plant ecology
3Animal, plant and microbial ecology
4Biodiversity
5Biological and medical sciences
6Biomedical and Life Sciences
7Borneo
8Burned forest regeneration
9Conservation Ecology - Original Paper
10Conservation Ecology - Original Papers
11east kalimantan
12Ecology
13Ecosystem
14El Nino drought
15Fire damage
16Fires
17Forest canopy
18Forest fires
19Forest regeneration
20Forest succession
21Forestry
22Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
23General aspects
24General forest ecology
25Generalities. Production, biomass. Quality of wood and forest products. General forest ecology
26Hydrology/Water Resources
27indonesia
28Life Sciences
29Old growth forests
30Pioneer species
31Plant Sciences
32Recruitment
33responses
34restoration
35species composition
36Trees
37Tropical Climate
38Tropical forests
39Tropical rain forests
40Understory
41vegetation
42wood density
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titleTree Diversity, Composition, Forest Structure and Aboveground Biomass Dynamics after Single and Repeated Fire in a Bornean Rain Forest
authorSlik, J.W.F ; Bernard, C.S ; Beek, van, M ; Breman, F.C ; Eichhorn, K.A.O
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1amazonian forests
2Animal and plant ecology
3Animal, plant and microbial ecology
4Biodiversity
5Biological and medical sciences
6Biomedical and Life Sciences
7Borneo
8Burned forest regeneration
9Conservation Ecology - Original Paper
10Conservation Ecology - Original Papers
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21Forestry
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28Life Sciences
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30Pioneer species
31Plant Sciences
32Recruitment
33responses
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35species composition
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37Tropical Climate
38Tropical forests
39Tropical rain forests
40Understory
41vegetation
42wood density
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atitleTree Diversity, Composition, Forest Structure and Aboveground Biomass Dynamics after Single and Repeated Fire in a Bornean Rain Forest
jtitleOecologia
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abstractForest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO₂. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent decades, however, tropical forest fires occur more frequently and at larger spatial scales than they used to. We studied forest structure, tree species diversity, tree species composition, and aboveground biomass during the first 7 years since fire in unburned, once burned and twice burned forest of eastern Borneo to determine the rate of recovery of these forests. We paid special attention to changes in the tree species composition during burned forest regeneration because we expect the long-term recovery of aboveground biomass and ecosystem functions in burned forests to largely depend on the successful regeneration of the prefire, heavy-wood, species composition. We found that forest structure (canopy openness, leaf area index, herb cover, and stem density) is strongly affected by fire but shows quick recovery. However, species composition shows no or limited recovery and aboveground biomass, which is greatly reduced by fire, continues to be low or decline up to 7 years after fire. Consequently, large amounts of the C released to the atmosphere by fire will not be recaptured by the burned forest ecosystem in the near future. We also observed that repeated fire, with an inter-fire interval of 15 years, does not necessarily lead to a huge deterioration in the regeneration potential of tropical forest. We conclude that burned forests are valuable and should be conserved and that long-term monitoring programs in secondary forests are necessary to determine their recovery rates, especially in relation to aboveground biomass accumulation.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer
pmid18839212
doi10.1007/s00442-008-1163-2