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Promoting Informed Choice: Evaluating a Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers in Mexico

Context: The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a decision-making tool to be used by providers and clients during family planning visits to improve the quality of services. It is important to examine the tool's usability and its impact on counseling and decision-making processes during fa... Full description

Journal Title: International family planning perspectives 2005, Vol.31 (4), p.162-171
Main Author: YOUNG MI KIM
Other Authors: KOLS, Adrienne , MARTIN, Antonieta , SILVA, David , RINEHART, Ward , PRAMMAWAT, Sarah , JOHNSON, Sarah , CHURCH, Andkathryn
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: New York, NY: The Alan Guttmacher Institute
ID: ISSN: 0190-3187
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title: Promoting Informed Choice: Evaluating a Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers in Mexico
format: Article
creator:
  • YOUNG MI KIM
  • KOLS, Adrienne
  • MARTIN, Antonieta
  • SILVA, David
  • RINEHART, Ward
  • PRAMMAWAT, Sarah
  • JOHNSON, Sarah
  • CHURCH, Andkathryn
subjects:
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Ambulatory Care Facilities
  • Communication
  • Consciousness
  • Customers
  • Decision Making
  • Decision support systems
  • Equipment and supplies
  • Eye contact
  • Family planning
  • Family planning services
  • Family Planning Services - education
  • Female
  • Focus groups
  • Health Personnel - education
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Humans
  • Information
  • Magnetic storage
  • Male
  • Management
  • Mexico
  • Middle Aged
  • Prevention
  • Professional-Patient Relations
  • Psychological aspects
  • Quality of Health Care
  • Quality standards
  • School counseling
  • Sociology
  • Sociology of organizations and enterprises. Bureaucracy and administration
  • Sociology of work and sociology of organizations
  • Tailoring
  • Training
  • Urban Population
  • Usability
  • Videotape Recording
  • World Health Organization
ispartof: International family planning perspectives, 2005, Vol.31 (4), p.162-171
description: Context: The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a decision-making tool to be used by providers and clients during family planning visits to improve the quality of services. It is important to examine the tool's usability and its impact on counseling and decision-making processes during family planning consultations. Methods: Thirteen providers in Mexico City were videotaped with family planning clients three months before and one month after attending a training session on the WHO decision-making tool. The videotapes were coded for client-provider communication and eye contact, and decision-making behaviors were rated. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions explored clients' and providers' opinions of the tool. Results: After providers began using the decision-making tool, they gave clients more information on family planning, tailored that information more closely to clients' situations and more often discussed HIV/AIDS prevention, dual protection and condom use. Client involvement in the decision-making process and client active communication increased, contributing to a shift from provider-dominated to shared decision making. Clients reported that the tool helped them understand the provider's explanations and made them feel more comfortable talking and asking questions during consultations. After one month of practice with the decision-making tool, most providers felt comfortable with it and found it useful; however, they recommended some changes to the tool to help engage clients in the decision-making process. Conclusions: The decision-making tool was useful both as a job aid for providers and as a decision aid for clients.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0190-3187
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0190-3187
  • 1943-4154
url: Link


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titlePromoting Informed Choice: Evaluating a Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers in Mexico
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creatorYOUNG MI KIM ; KOLS, Adrienne ; MARTIN, Antonieta ; SILVA, David ; RINEHART, Ward ; PRAMMAWAT, Sarah ; JOHNSON, Sarah ; CHURCH, Andkathryn
creatorcontribYOUNG MI KIM ; KOLS, Adrienne ; MARTIN, Antonieta ; SILVA, David ; RINEHART, Ward ; PRAMMAWAT, Sarah ; JOHNSON, Sarah ; CHURCH, Andkathryn
descriptionContext: The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a decision-making tool to be used by providers and clients during family planning visits to improve the quality of services. It is important to examine the tool's usability and its impact on counseling and decision-making processes during family planning consultations. Methods: Thirteen providers in Mexico City were videotaped with family planning clients three months before and one month after attending a training session on the WHO decision-making tool. The videotapes were coded for client-provider communication and eye contact, and decision-making behaviors were rated. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions explored clients' and providers' opinions of the tool. Results: After providers began using the decision-making tool, they gave clients more information on family planning, tailored that information more closely to clients' situations and more often discussed HIV/AIDS prevention, dual protection and condom use. Client involvement in the decision-making process and client active communication increased, contributing to a shift from provider-dominated to shared decision making. Clients reported that the tool helped them understand the provider's explanations and made them feel more comfortable talking and asking questions during consultations. After one month of practice with the decision-making tool, most providers felt comfortable with it and found it useful; however, they recommended some changes to the tool to help engage clients in the decision-making process. Conclusions: The decision-making tool was useful both as a job aid for providers and as a decision aid for clients.
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subjectAdolescent ; Adult ; Ambulatory Care Facilities ; Communication ; Consciousness ; Customers ; Decision Making ; Decision support systems ; Equipment and supplies ; Eye contact ; Family planning ; Family planning services ; Family Planning Services - education ; Female ; Focus groups ; Health Personnel - education ; Human immunodeficiency virus ; Humans ; Information ; Magnetic storage ; Male ; Management ; Mexico ; Middle Aged ; Prevention ; Professional-Patient Relations ; Psychological aspects ; Quality of Health Care ; Quality standards ; School counseling ; Sociology ; Sociology of organizations and enterprises. Bureaucracy and administration ; Sociology of work and sociology of organizations ; Tailoring ; Training ; Urban Population ; Usability ; Videotape Recording ; World Health Organization
ispartofInternational family planning perspectives, 2005, Vol.31 (4), p.162-171
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descriptionContext: The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a decision-making tool to be used by providers and clients during family planning visits to improve the quality of services. It is important to examine the tool's usability and its impact on counseling and decision-making processes during family planning consultations. Methods: Thirteen providers in Mexico City were videotaped with family planning clients three months before and one month after attending a training session on the WHO decision-making tool. The videotapes were coded for client-provider communication and eye contact, and decision-making behaviors were rated. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions explored clients' and providers' opinions of the tool. Results: After providers began using the decision-making tool, they gave clients more information on family planning, tailored that information more closely to clients' situations and more often discussed HIV/AIDS prevention, dual protection and condom use. Client involvement in the decision-making process and client active communication increased, contributing to a shift from provider-dominated to shared decision making. Clients reported that the tool helped them understand the provider's explanations and made them feel more comfortable talking and asking questions during consultations. After one month of practice with the decision-making tool, most providers felt comfortable with it and found it useful; however, they recommended some changes to the tool to help engage clients in the decision-making process. Conclusions: The decision-making tool was useful both as a job aid for providers and as a decision aid for clients.
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7CHURCH, Andkathryn
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atitlePromoting Informed Choice: Evaluating a Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers in Mexico
jtitleInternational family planning perspectives
addtitleInt Fam Plan Perspect
date2005-12-01
risdate2005
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issue4
spage162
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pages162-171
issn0190-3187
eissn1943-4154
abstractContext: The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a decision-making tool to be used by providers and clients during family planning visits to improve the quality of services. It is important to examine the tool's usability and its impact on counseling and decision-making processes during family planning consultations. Methods: Thirteen providers in Mexico City were videotaped with family planning clients three months before and one month after attending a training session on the WHO decision-making tool. The videotapes were coded for client-provider communication and eye contact, and decision-making behaviors were rated. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions explored clients' and providers' opinions of the tool. Results: After providers began using the decision-making tool, they gave clients more information on family planning, tailored that information more closely to clients' situations and more often discussed HIV/AIDS prevention, dual protection and condom use. Client involvement in the decision-making process and client active communication increased, contributing to a shift from provider-dominated to shared decision making. Clients reported that the tool helped them understand the provider's explanations and made them feel more comfortable talking and asking questions during consultations. After one month of practice with the decision-making tool, most providers felt comfortable with it and found it useful; however, they recommended some changes to the tool to help engage clients in the decision-making process. Conclusions: The decision-making tool was useful both as a job aid for providers and as a decision aid for clients.
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doi10.1363/3116205
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