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Amphibians Do Not Follow Bergmann's Rule

The tendency for organisms to be larger in cooler climates (Bergmann's rule) is widely observed in endotherms, and has been reputed to apply to some ectotherms including amphibians. However, recent reports provide conflicting support for the pattern, questioning whether Bergmann's clines are general... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2008-02, Vol.62 (2), p.413-420
Main Author: Adams, Dean C
Other Authors: Church, James O
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Malden, USA: Blackwell Science Inc
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17999723
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_70344935
title: Amphibians Do Not Follow Bergmann's Rule
format: Article
creator:
  • Adams, Dean C
  • Church, James O
subjects:
  • Adaptation, Biological
  • Amphibians
  • Anatomy & physiology
  • Animals
  • Bergmann's rule
  • Biological Evolution
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Body Size
  • Body Temperature
  • Classification
  • Climate
  • Clines
  • Correlation analysis
  • Correlations
  • Environmental aspects
  • Evolution
  • Evolution, Molecular
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Geography
  • kernel density estimation
  • Meta-analysis
  • Models, Genetic
  • Nonnative species
  • Original s
  • Physiological aspects
  • Plethodon
  • Reptiles & amphibians
  • Salamanders
  • Species Specificity
  • Taxa
  • Temperature
  • thermal clines
  • United States
  • Urodela - anatomy & histology
  • Urodela - genetics
  • Usage
  • Vertebrates
  • Zoology
ispartof: Evolution, 2008-02, Vol.62 (2), p.413-420
description: The tendency for organisms to be larger in cooler climates (Bergmann's rule) is widely observed in endotherms, and has been reputed to apply to some ectotherms including amphibians. However, recent reports provide conflicting support for the pattern, questioning whether Bergmann's clines are generally present in amphibians. In this study, we measured 96,996 adult Plethodon from 3974 populations to test for the presence of Bergmann's clines in these salamanders. Only three Plethodon species exhibited a significant negative correlation between body size and temperature consistent with Bergmann's rule, whereas 37 of 40 species did not display a pattern consistent with this prediction. Further, a phylogenetic comparative analysis found no relationship between body size and temperature among species. A meta-analysis combining our data with the available data for other amphibian species revealed no support for Bergmann's rule at the genus (Plethodon), order (Caudata), or class (Amphibia) levels. Our findings strongly suggest that negative thermal body size clines are not common in amphibians, and we conclude that Bergmann's rule is not generally applicable to these taxa. Thus, evolutionary explanations of Bergmann's clines in other tetrapods need not account for unique life-history attributes of amphibians.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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descriptionThe tendency for organisms to be larger in cooler climates (Bergmann's rule) is widely observed in endotherms, and has been reputed to apply to some ectotherms including amphibians. However, recent reports provide conflicting support for the pattern, questioning whether Bergmann's clines are generally present in amphibians. In this study, we measured 96,996 adult Plethodon from 3974 populations to test for the presence of Bergmann's clines in these salamanders. Only three Plethodon species exhibited a significant negative correlation between body size and temperature consistent with Bergmann's rule, whereas 37 of 40 species did not display a pattern consistent with this prediction. Further, a phylogenetic comparative analysis found no relationship between body size and temperature among species. A meta-analysis combining our data with the available data for other amphibian species revealed no support for Bergmann's rule at the genus (Plethodon), order (Caudata), or class (Amphibia) levels. Our findings strongly suggest that negative thermal body size clines are not common in amphibians, and we conclude that Bergmann's rule is not generally applicable to these taxa. Thus, evolutionary explanations of Bergmann's clines in other tetrapods need not account for unique life-history attributes of amphibians.
editionReceived July 31, 2007Accepted October 29, 2007
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subjectAdaptation, Biological ; Amphibians ; Anatomy & physiology ; Animals ; Bergmann's rule ; Biological Evolution ; Biological taxonomies ; Body Size ; Body Temperature ; Classification ; Climate ; Clines ; Correlation analysis ; Correlations ; Environmental aspects ; Evolution ; Evolution, Molecular ; Evolutionary biology ; Geography ; kernel density estimation ; Meta-analysis ; Models, Genetic ; Nonnative species ; Original s ; Physiological aspects ; Plethodon ; Reptiles & amphibians ; Salamanders ; Species Specificity ; Taxa ; Temperature ; thermal clines ; United States ; Urodela - anatomy & histology ; Urodela - genetics ; Usage ; Vertebrates ; Zoology
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2Anatomy & physiology
3Animals
4Bergmann's rule
5Biological Evolution
6Biological taxonomies
7Body Size
8Body Temperature
9Classification
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17Evolutionary biology
18Geography
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21Models, Genetic
22Nonnative species
23Original s
24Physiological aspects
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26Reptiles & amphibians
27Salamanders
28Species Specificity
29Taxa
30Temperature
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32United States
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abstractThe tendency for organisms to be larger in cooler climates (Bergmann's rule) is widely observed in endotherms, and has been reputed to apply to some ectotherms including amphibians. However, recent reports provide conflicting support for the pattern, questioning whether Bergmann's clines are generally present in amphibians. In this study, we measured 96,996 adult Plethodon from 3974 populations to test for the presence of Bergmann's clines in these salamanders. Only three Plethodon species exhibited a significant negative correlation between body size and temperature consistent with Bergmann's rule, whereas 37 of 40 species did not display a pattern consistent with this prediction. Further, a phylogenetic comparative analysis found no relationship between body size and temperature among species. A meta-analysis combining our data with the available data for other amphibian species revealed no support for Bergmann's rule at the genus (Plethodon), order (Caudata), or class (Amphibia) levels. Our findings strongly suggest that negative thermal body size clines are not common in amphibians, and we conclude that Bergmann's rule is not generally applicable to these taxa. Thus, evolutionary explanations of Bergmann's clines in other tetrapods need not account for unique life-history attributes of amphibians.
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editionReceived July 31, 2007Accepted October 29, 2007
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